Tag Archive for a doll’s house

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, LAST DAY!!!

Before we start today’s lesson… Check out your “I Need Feminism Because” video that we made with your pictures from last week!

Music: “Soy Yo” by Bomba Estéreo

Goals for the Week:

  1. Write a response to a prompt analyzing A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates.
  3. Finalize all work on A Doll’s House and our Feminism unit and prepare for our next learning experience!

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Remind ourselves what a theme is and how to find one.
  2. Consider some possible themes of A Doll’s House.
  3. Find out the topic of OUR NEXT UNIT!!!!!

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: 

I can determine a theme of a text by analyzing A Doll’s House so that I can write about how Nora’s character reveals and shapes the theme.

Activator: 

Today we’re talking all about THEME! Need a reminder of what theme means, some examples, and how to find one? Check out D4Darious, who will explain it to you!

 

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this week!

This week is your largest assignment to date! Each day we will explore a different topic related to feminism and A Doll’s House. I have made a Google Doc with 5 prompts, one for each day this week. CHOOSE ONE PROMPT and write a paragraph in response to it.

Type your response in this document!

Remember, you only need to respond to ONE prompt this week!

Today’s Topic: Theme!

As you saw in the opening video, theme is a moral or message that the author is trying to tell you in their story. Every movie, book, play, and story has a theme. What’s most interesting about theme is that it’s completely up to the person who’s reading the story to determine it – a writer can try to make you learn a specific lesson, and they are often successful, BUT if a reader gets a completely different message, that’s still a valid theme!

For example, the writers of Finding Nemo might have intended the lesson to be that parents should trust their children and let hem make their own decisions. But if you watch that movie and think the message is that parents should keep their kids on a very short leash so they don’t get kidnapped or worse, that’s still a valid theme!

The important thing about a theme is that you must be able to back up your theme with evidence from the text.

Let’s consider 2 themes for A Doll’s House:

  • Society expects women to stay home and take care of their house and family above all else.

Do we have evidence from the play to back this up? What do you think? If Torvald is representative of society, then he certainly expects Nora to put her household above everything else. Even the laws of the time try to keep women at home!

  • Lies will always destroy relationships.

Do we have evidence from the play to back this up? Nora lied to Torvald and it certainly destroyed their relationship! And Mrs. Linde and Krogstad only got a happy ending when they finally told the truth to one another.

If you want to do today’s prompt for this week’s writing assignment, think of a theme from the play (or use one of my examples) and explain how the play shows that theme 🙂

Closing Session: 

AND THAT’S A WRAP! We’re done with A Doll’s House and our feminism unit! Now it’s time for the big reveal….our next unit will be….

(drumroll please….)

 

Short Stories!!!

We will be reading short stories from around the world, and you guys will choose one slightly larger project to complete over the unit.

Now… Go enjoy your spring break! Stay safe, stay well, and try and have some socially-distant fun!

Looking Ahead: Next Unit

When we return from Spring Break, we start a NEW UNIT! We will be reading a series of short stories from many authors around the world. Here are your goals for the first week 🙂

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Decide on and begin a project from the Choice Board
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 14

Goals for the Week:

  1. Write a response to a prompt analyzing A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates.
  3. Finalize all work on A Doll’s House and our Feminism unit and prepare for our next learning experience!

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Remind ourselves of the ending of A Doll’s House
  2. Consider this character study of Nora Helmer
  3. Form an opinion: Do you think Nora made the right decision?

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze the complex character of Nora Helmer by reading a character study and reviewing A Doll’s House so that I can decide if she made the right choice to leave her family.

Activator: 

It’s been a week since we finished reading the play, so I wanted to give you a chance to review the ending of the play. This is probably the best movie version 🙂

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this week!

This week is your largest assignment to date! Each day we will explore a different topic related to feminism and A Doll’s House. I have made a Google Doc with 5 prompts, one for each day this week. CHOOSE ONE PROMPT and write a paragraph in response to it.

Type your response in this document!

Remember, you only need to respond to ONE prompt this week!

Today’s Topic: Nora’s Choice

Nora’s choice to leave her family at the end of the play is very controversial. Check out this quote from the end of act III:

Nora. What do you consider my most sacred duties?

Helmer. Do I need to tell you that? Are they not your duties to your husband and your children?

Nora. I have other duties just as sacred.

Helmer. That you have not. What duties could those be?

Nora. Duties to myself.

Helmer. Before all else, you are a wife and a mother.

Nora. I don’t believe that any longer. I believe that before all else I am a reasonable human being, just as you are–or, at all events, that I must try and become one.

Nora’s “duties” to be a wife and mother, she says, come second to her duties to herself as a human being. I know most of you reading this aren’t moms, but I bet your moms know this feeling – your kids are supposed to be the most important thing in the world, but how are you supposed to take care of them if you don’t also take care of yourself?

This is a common sentiment in mom groups:

Or, another common one, when you’re on an airplane they always tell you that if the oxygen masks pop out of the ceiling, you’re supposed to put your own mask on before you assist your children with theirs:

When Nora walks out on her husband and children, she knows the kids will be cared for by Anne, the nanny. And Torvald makes plenty of money, so finances aren’t a problem. So that leads us to the big question:

  • Did Nora make the right choice to leave her family and find herself?

Check out this character study of Nora Helmer. It talks about how Nora goes from childish and flighty to determined and resolute. This is an important part:

Since the premiere of Ibsen’s “A Doll’s House,” much has been discussed regarding the final controversial scene. Why does Nora leave not only Torvald but her children as well? Many critics and theater-goers questioned the morality of the play’s resolution. In fact, some productions in Germany refused to produce the original ending. Ibsen acquiesced and grudgingly wrote an alternate ending in which Nora breaks down and cries, deciding to stay, but only for her children’s sake.

What do you think? This is your writing prompt for the day, if you choose to do today’s, but even if you don’t want to write about it, I want you to form an opinion. Did Nora do the right thing to leave her kids and husband behind? Or should she have stayed?

Closing Session: 

While we’re talking about self-care, let me remind you that it’s important for you to take care of yourself while we’re all in isolation. Check out this article from NPR with some tips for self care during the time of quarantine:

  • Eat healthy foods
  • Stay physically active
  • Get regular sleep and rest
  • Create a sense of structure and routine in daily life
  • Connect socially with friends and family, while maintaining physical distance

…and then go do something to take care of yourself today!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Remind ourselves what a theme is and how to find one.
  2. Consider some possible themes of A Doll’s House.
  3. Find out the topic of OUR NEXT UNIT!!!!!

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 13

Today’s lesson is all about mansplaining, which is when a man explains something to a woman that she already knows. I’m willing to bet that a man on YouTube will comment on today’s video, explaining something to me… and that’s no April Fool’s joke 😉

Goals for the Week:

  1. Write a response to a prompt analyzing A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates.
  3. Finalize all work on A Doll’s House and our Feminism unit and prepare for our next learning experience!

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Check out this flowchart that determines if it’s mansplaining or not
  2. Look over this 2008 essay by Rebecca Solnit, “Men Explain Things To Me”
  3. Read through this gif-heavy list of 6 Subtle Forms of Mansplaining from Bustle

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze how an author explains her experience with mansplaining by reading women’s perspectives so that I can articulate and share my own thoughts.

Activator: 

Take a look at this screenshot of a Twitter exchange. In it, a female comic book author makes a joke about a character she writes, Punisher. Someone quickly pops up and tells her that her joke doesn’t work with the character’s backstory. What do you think about this exchange?

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this week!

This week is your largest assignment to date! Each day we will explore a different topic related to feminism and A Doll’s House. I have made a Google Doc with 5 prompts, one for each day this week. CHOOSE ONE PROMPT and write a paragraph in response to it.

Type your response in this document!

Remember, you only need to respond to ONE prompt this week!

Today’s Topic: Mansplaining

  • Mansplaining in A Doll’s House

Let’s start off by looking at this fine example of mansplaining from A Doll’s House:

Helmer. What, already? Is this yours, this knitting?

Mrs Linde [taking it]. Yes, thank you, I had very nearly forgotten it.

Helmer. So you knit?

Mrs Linde. Of course.

Helmer. Do you know, you ought to embroider.

Mrs Linde. Really? Why?

Helmer. Yes, it’s far more becoming. Let me show you. You hold the embroidery thus in your left hand, and use the needle with the right–like this–with a long, easy sweep. Do you see?

Mrs Linde. Yes, perhaps–

Helmer. But in the case of knitting–that can never be anything but ungraceful; look here–the arms close together, the knitting-needles going up and down–it has a sort of Chinese effect–. That was really excellent champagne they gave us.

In this quote, Torvald explains to Mrs. Linde – who has made her living off work like knitting and embroidery – why she should embroider instead of knit, and even how do embroider. Of course Mrs. Linde just nods politely to all of this… But this is a prime example of mansplaining. Do you think Torvald has ever held a needle or hoop in his life?

Do you agree or disagree with this chart?

The essay starts about halfway down the page. It’s rather long and esoteric, discussing things that probably don’t make a whole lot of sense to you (they didn’t to me!). But the point is this: The author of this essay encountered a man at a party who explained her own book to her. As in, she WROTE the book, and this man chose to explain the content of the book to its author. That’s sort of like trying to explain Romeo and Juliet to Shakespeare.

This essay was written in 2008, before the term mansplaining was even coined. Take a minute to at least skim the article and consider Solnit’s experience.

This article discusses some of the author’s personal experience, as well as some famous public examples of mansplaining. I loved the animated gifs throughout 🙂 Read through this article and consider if you’ve ever encountered – or maybe been guilty of? – one of these common ways of mansplaining.

Closing Session: 

Okay, I think you get the concept, but if you want a laugh, check out this Funny or Die skit called “Cavemansplaining”

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Remind ourselves of the ending of A Doll’s House
  2. Consider this character study of Nora Helmer
  3. Form an opinion: Do you think Nora made the right decision?

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 11

Goals for the Week:

  1. Write a response to a prompt analyzing A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates.
  3. Finalize all work on A Doll’s House and our Feminism unit and prepare for our next learning experience!

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read and consider this article from Time about feminism in movies
  2. Understand and explore the Bechdel Test
  3. Find a movie that passes the Bechdel test to watch this week 🙂

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze the representation of women in plays and movies by reading an article and watching movie clips, so that I can understand how female characters have changed over the years.

Activator: 

Check out these two Disney Princess videos. The first is Ariel, singing “Part of Your World” from The Little Mermaid:

And the second is Elsa, singing “Show Yourself” from Frozen II:

Consider the differences in these two songs. Both are sung by princesses. How is “Show Yourself,” the much more modern song, more empowering for Elsa than “Part of Your World” is for Ariel? What does this say about how Disney Princesses have changed over the past 30 years?

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this week!

This week is your largest assignment to date! Each day we will explore a different topic related to feminism and A Doll’s House. I have made a Google Doc with 5 prompts, one for each day this week. CHOOSE ONE PROMPT and write a paragraph in response to it.

Type your response in this document!

Remember, you only need to respond to ONE prompt this week!

Today’s Topic: Feminism in Movies!

Today we’re talking about feminism and women’s representation in movies! After our opening and considering the evolution of princesses from 1989 to 2019, let’s continue to dig into movies and women.

This article talks specifically about Elsa’s wardrobe in Frozen II – she wears pants! Although Jasmine did wear pants in Aladdin, this is the first time a princess’s outfit has been more about practicality than prettiness. However, the article wonders if Frozen II (and many other current movies) go far enough to advance feminism. Consider your own thoughts – for example, do you appreciate the treatment of women in Avengers: Endgame or did it seem trite and contrived?

The Bechdel test is so simple that you’d think almost every movie would pass it: The movie must (1) contain two named female characters, (2) who have a conversation, (3) about something other than a man. Despite the simplicity, only about 60% of movies pass the test. Take some time to explore the website, look up some of your favorite movies, and see if they pass the test. If they do pass, how well do they pass? One of my favorite movies is Black Panther, and it only kinda barely passes with a 30-second scene that seems shoehorned in.

After you’ve taken some time to explore the movies, choose one and watch it this week 🙂

Closing Session: 

For our closing session today, I want you to go out and find a movie that passes the Bechdel test and sit down to watch it! You don’t have to watch it today if you’re busy, but put it on your calendar for this week. You should be able to find one on whatever streaming service you have access to (might I recommend Captain Marvel on Disney+?). Look for the scene that makes the movie pass the test – is it one small scene, or are there many conversations between women about something other than a man?

Also, if you’re more of a YouTube type person, check out this video series by Innuendo Studios called “Bringing Back What’s Stolen.” This is the introduction video – it’s a whole series of episodes about women in movies, using Mad Max: Fury Road as its basis. Enjoy!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Check out this advice from Princeton University on wholesome masculinity
  2. Read this article from Christian Lopez on Medium about What Non-Toxic Masculinity Looks Like
  3. Consider our own opinions on what makes something wholesome-masculine versus toxic-masculine.

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 10

Don’t forget! Zoom meeting TODAY at 10am! I will send the link in Remind at 9:45!

Goals for the Week:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Attend the virtual class meeting on Zoom if you are able.
  2. Find a way to collaborate with your teacher or classmates – comment on the blog, on YouTube, etc.
  3. Send your “I Need Feminism Because” photo to your teacher, and check your feedback from last week’s assignment 🙂

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: 

I can collaborate in a discussion with my teacher or classmates by attending a virtual session (or using another option) so that I can understand my classmates’ ideas as well as my own.

Activator: 

Check out this Gillette commercial, “The Best a Man Can Be.” This was very controversial when it came out! Share your thoughts here, on YouTube, or in our Zoom session today!

Work Session: 

Good morning, everyone! I hope you’re able to read this on Friday morning, because we have our virtual meeting on Zoom at 10am! I will send the link via Remind at 9:45 – look for it there and join us!

If you cannot attend our virtual meeting, your job is to find some alternative way of collaborating with your teacher or classmates. Here are some ideas:

  • Comment here on the blog or on one of my YouTube videos
  • Host your own Zoom session with a classmate.
  • Start a group chat with several classmates to discuss feminism or the play.
  • Make a shared Google Doc with some of your classmates. Type your ideas there.

…or you can think of your own! Let’s just try and keep some kind of semblance of reality in this weird, new world 🙂

Closing Session: 

Don’t forget to send your teacher your “I need feminism because” sign selfie! Just make a sign that completes the sentence “I need feminism because…” and take a selfie of you holding it, and send it to your teacher. I will compile them into a video for us! This is your one and only assignment this week, so if you haven’t already done it, please do it now!

Looking Ahead: Next Week’s Goals and Tomorrow’s Checklist

These are our goals for next week!

  1. Write a response to a prompt analyzing A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates.
  3. Finalize all work on A Doll’s House and our Feminism unit and prepare for our next learning experience!

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing on Monday!

  1. Read and consider this article from Time about feminism in movies
  2. Understand and explore the Bechdel Test
  3. Find a movie that passes the Bechdel test to watch this week 🙂