Tag Archive for act iii

American Lit: The Crucibile, Act III, Continued

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

Learning Target: I can determine the meaning of words from The Crucible as they are used in the text.

Opening Session: VOCAB QUIZ!

Work Session: Today we will continue reading Act III, getting as far as we can today before the end of class. Enjoy!

Closing Session: Finish the selected response and constructed response questions from earlier this week that you weren’t able to answer yet.

Assessment: Formal – book check and vocab quiz

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding)

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your Tuesday…

IT’S MY BIRTHDAY!!!! HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO MEEEEEEEEEE!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

 Learning Target: I can understand Antony’s famous “Friends, Romans, Countrymen” speech, both for its meaning as well as for its impact.

Opening Session: Look at these two versions of Antony’s famous speech that we’re about to read (preview). What do you notice is different about the two interpretations? Which one do you like better? Which one do you think is closer to how Shakespeare intended it to be?

Work Session: Today we are going to finish reading Act III, which contains the most famous scenes in the entire play, the funeral speeches!! We’re also going to see act III scene III, which is kind of entertaining and is intended as comic relief.

After we finish that, we’re going to work on a translation of Antony’s famous speech to modern English. You can use any slang or informal language you like, so long as you keep the meaning from the original intact. We also need to go down to the computer lab for another formative assessment, so we’ll do that during the first half of class.

You can use this template to help you out: Antony’s Speech Translation

That’s today, y’all! Hope you have a fabulous weekend!!

Closing Session: 3 volunteers to share their speeches with the class!

Assessment: Speech translations will be graded

Differentiation: Process, readiness, interest (Varied reading part lengths based on readiness and interest); process (graphic organizers for the speech translation, adapted speech versions (No Fear Shakespeare) as needed).

Act III, Scene AWESOME!!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Learning Target: I can understand how the modern day class struggle is similar to the patricians vs. plebeians struggle in ancient Rome and how Caesar’s death played a part in that struggle.

Activator: Caesar’s death scene as depicted in the HBO show Rome (which is an EXCELLENT show to watch if your parents are comfortable with you seeing some adult content!)

 

Work Session: 

Today we will start out by reading!! I believe we need to finish act II, and then we will read act III scene i…which is where Caesar dies. Sorry, Caesar.

After we finish reading today, we’re going to read a couple articles about the new #blacklivesmatter civil rights movement, and about the class struggle in modern America.

First, the class struggle is real:

http://www.cnn.com/2012/01/11/us/rich-poor-conflict/

Second, a new civil rights movement:

https://newsela.com/articles/New-civilrights/id/6294/

After we SQPRRS the articles, we’re going to talk about them as a class. Do you agree? Disagree? Why?

Closing Session:

Ticket out the door: Would you join a protest? What issues are important enough to you personally that would make you get out there?

Differentiation: Articles in 2 different lexiles (process).

Assessment: SQPRRS will be graded.