Tag Archive for argument essay

World Lit: The Story of Stuff

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL1.b Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL3 Evaluate and/or reflect on a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target

Students will analyze the elements of arguments and appeals in film.

Opening Session

VOCAB!

  1. Condense
  2. Affiliation
  3. Populist
  4. Galvanized
  5. Predation
  6. Perpetuate
  7. Imperative
  8. Mitigate
  9. Mandates
  10. Myopic

Work Session

Grab your Springboard and look at page 476. Let’s go over what each of the terms in the left hand column mean: Hook, Claim, Support, Concessions/Refutations, and Call to Action.

To start out today, we’re going to watch a video called “The Story of Bottled Water” and then do the chart on page 476 together for the video. DON’T WRITE IN THE BOOK for this one because you’re going to do one on your own in a few minutes!

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-bottled-water/

After we do the chart together on the board, I’m going to show you another video called “The Story of Stuff” from the same website, and this time I want you to fill in the chart on your own.

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-stuff/

Finally, I want you to grab a sheet of your own paper and make a chart brainstorming for your own presentation. What will your hook be? Your claim? Your presentation should have all these things in it!

Closing Session

Trade papers with a friend and review each other’s brainstorming. Help your partner have a successful presentation!

Assessment

Formative (book check, brainstorming)

Differentiation

Scaffolding, learning style, high interest videos

AP Lang: Rhetorical Devices

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze the various types of persuasive appeals and rhetorical devices and use one to “sell” something to their classmates.

Opening Session
Let’s review this rhetorical devices PowerPoint! You should be taking notes and choosing your favorite 🙂

Work Session
I’m going to put everyone into random groups now. You’ll draw the name of a product from my jar and then group up with the other people who drew the same thing. Your job today is to choose a rhetorical device and create a commercial for the product you have chosen using the best rhetorical device for the job.

Here is the list of products you’ll be selling:

  • hunting rifles
  • deodorant
  • dry erase markers
  • bar soap
  • toilet seats
  • bandaids
  • a Mexican-Sushi fusion restaurant
  • the trailers our classrooms are in

Choose a rhetorical device we’ve talked about and sell your item to the class in a 30-second commercial spot. Don’t tell us the rhetorical device – we should be able to figure it out! We will all present our commercials at the end of class 🙂

Closing Session
VOTE! Which group do you think did the best job selling their item and why?

Assessment
Formative (persuasive appeals skits)

Differentiation
Learning style (visual, kinesthetic)

AP Lang: Persuasive Appeals

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will examine various types of persuasive appeals and how they can be used as effective forms of rhetoric.

Opening Session
Let’s brainstorm together! You guys have heard of persuasive appeals before, and although you may not know the names, you’ve heard of logical fallacies before. Let’s make a T chart and list the types of effective persuasive appeals on one side and the wrong ways to argue on the other side!

Work Session
We’re going to start out today with a little exercise in argument. Grab a sheet of paper and at the top write down something you want to do but that you know for certain your parents will not allow. You might write down going to a party, dating someone, getting a tattoo, not going to college, or anything along those lines.

Then, on the front of the sheet of paper, brainstorm and write down all the reasons you know your parents will give you for saying no. Not just “because I’m your mom and that’s why,” but the real reasons they actually have.

Flip the paper over to the back and compose a letter to your parents convincing them to let you do the thing. You should consider each of the reasons your parents will say no, and then explain why each of those reasons is wrong.

Closing Session
Once our letters are done, I want to review the persuasive appeals. We will look at Logos, Pathos, and Ethos, and come up with examples of each.

Assessment
Formative (letters, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (student choice, scaffolded letters, graphic organizers)