Tag Archive for argumentation

World Lit: Bias and Sea Lions

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will evaluate the use of evidence in support of a potential solution to a conflict.

Opening Session
Let’s talk about what we know about bias! What does it mean if someone is biased? Can a source be both biased and credible?

Work Session
Flip in your Springboards to page 443. I’m going to number the class while you guys find the right page. Odd numbers are going to be reading the article titled “The HSUS and Wild Fish Conservancy File Suit top Stop Sea Lion Killing at Bonneville Dam” and then do the second read questions. Even numbers will read “Sea Lions vs. Salmon: Restore Balance and Common Sense” and answer those second read questions.

After we have read and answered the questions, let’s talk about bias again. Do you think either article was biased, and if so how?

Closing Session
Each article we read was a proposal about how to solve an environmental issue. For your essay we will start tomorrow, YOU will be writing a proposal for how to help the social issue you wrote about in your last essay. Consider the bias (or non-bias) of the sources we have read today and how that affected the persuasiveness of the proposal. Then, start brainstorming for your essay tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative (book check)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style) Interest

World Lit: The Story of Stuff

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL1.b Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL3 Evaluate and/or reflect on a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target

Students will analyze the elements of arguments and appeals in film.

Opening Session

VOCAB!

  1. Condense
  2. Affiliation
  3. Populist
  4. Galvanized
  5. Predation
  6. Perpetuate
  7. Imperative
  8. Mitigate
  9. Mandates
  10. Myopic

Work Session

Grab your Springboard and look at page 476. Let’s go over what each of the terms in the left hand column mean: Hook, Claim, Support, Concessions/Refutations, and Call to Action.

To start out today, we’re going to watch a video called “The Story of Bottled Water” and then do the chart on page 476 together for the video. DON’T WRITE IN THE BOOK for this one because you’re going to do one on your own in a few minutes!

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-bottled-water/

After we do the chart together on the board, I’m going to show you another video called “The Story of Stuff” from the same website, and this time I want you to fill in the chart on your own.

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-stuff/

Finally, I want you to grab a sheet of your own paper and make a chart brainstorming for your own presentation. What will your hook be? Your claim? Your presentation should have all these things in it!

Closing Session

Trade papers with a friend and review each other’s brainstorming. Help your partner have a successful presentation!

Assessment

Formative (book check, brainstorming)

Differentiation

Scaffolding, learning style, high interest videos

AP Lang: Debate Time!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12SL3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will debate on a controversial topic, with a focus on using valid, logical reasoning and avoiding logical fallacies.

Opening Session
Those of you who are going today, take ten minutes to prepare. Everyone else, get out a sheet of paper and be ready to write your responses to the debates!

Work Session
It’s DEBATE TIME! Again, here is how we will structure the debates:

  • Coin flip to see if pro or con goes first
  • Approximately one minute “opening statement” from each side (about a page of writing)
    Whoever went first gets to respond to the other side’s points, and then vice versa.
  • Approximately one minute closing statement from each side (about a page of writing – For partners, if you gave the opening statement, your partner must give the closing statement).

After our debates, take a couple minutes to write a short response. Who do you think won and why? Which arguments were most persuasive and why? Did you hear any logical fallacies?

Closing Session
Let’s draw for who will go next! Next SIX will be going on Thursday morning (our half day)!

Assessment
Formative (debate)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topics)

AP Lang: Let’s Get Ready To Debate!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12SL3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will research and draft arguments to debate on a controversial topic, with a focus on using valid, logical reasoning and avoiding logical fallacies.

Opening Session
Review! Let’s go over the fallacies and persuasive appeals again. And let me ask a question: Which do you think would be most useful in a debate? Because we’re going to be having debates this week!

Work Session
I’m going to pass around a sign up sheet for our debates this week! Here’s the deal:

You will choose either PRO (in favor of) or CON (against) side for your debate topic. You CAN have ONE PARTNER, but you do not have to – and you definitely can’t have more than one partner.

If you choose to have a partner in your debate, you must both speak EQUALLY – no one is allowed to be silent during the debate.

We will be having our debates in class over the next three days. You’ll have the rest of this class period to research your topic and form your argument. Here’s how the debate will be structured:

  • Coin flip to see if pro or con goes first
  • Approximately one minute “opening statement” from each side (about a page of writing)
  • Whoever went first gets to respond to the other side’s points, and then vice versa.
  • Approximately one minute closing statement from each side (about a page of writing – For partners, if you gave the opening statement, your partner must give the closing statement).

You should write out your intro and closing statements, as well as a page-ish of points you think the opposition will make and how you can respond to them.

You have the rest of class to research and put your debate together. GO!

Which side of the argument would you like to make a speech for period 3

Closing Session
Check in! How prepared are you feeling? I’m going to cut apart the sign up sheet and draw debates from a hat. The first five will go TOMORROW!

Assessment
Formative (debate prep check in)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topics)

AP Lang: Logical Fallacies, Day 2

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze their own writing for use of logical fallacies and then strengthen their writing by incorporating the rhetorical devices we have studied.

Opening Session
FRIDAY POP QUIZ!!! We’ll be quizzing over the logical fallacies we studied earlier this week 🙂

Work Session
I’m going to hand back the letters you wrote on Monday. Our goal today will be to revise your letters to remove any logical fallacies you wrote in before, and to add in some of the best rhetorical strategies you can.

Read through your letter on your own first, and then trade with a friend. Read through your friend’s letter and mark any logical fallacies you see, as well as places where you think your friend could strengthen their writing.

After we do our peer editing, grab a fresh new sheet of paper and rewrite a final draft of your letter, taking into account everything you have learned this week and the advice you were given by your friend.

If you want an extra challenge, take the letter home and see if you can convince mom or dad or whomever you stay with to do the thing!

Closing Session
Share out! I’ll take two volunteers to share their letters with the class 🙂

Assessment
Formative (letter revisions)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topic)