Tag Archive for argumentative

American Lit: Argumentative Essay DUE TODAY!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented indifferent media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can research my chosen topic and compose my argumentative essay.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop!

Trade essays with a partner and read what they wrote. At this point everyone should have a pretty good draft, so your partner should be able to give you some helpful feedback that you can use today to strengthen your essay and get your final draft completed.

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to work on composing your essay!

  • 750 words
  • at least 3 sources
  • at least 1 quote from each source
  • MLA format, including Works Cited page
  • No logical fallacies
  • Use of multiple persuasive appeals
  • Turned into the class OneNote

Closing Session
TURN IT IN!!!

I will show everyone again how to upload to the class OneNote and help anyone who is having trouble.

Assessment
Formative (essay check in), Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, research help), product (varied length)

American Lit: Argumentative Essay Drafting

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented indifferent media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can research my chosen topic and compose my argumentative essay.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop!
While you’re doing that, I will review how to upload your essay to the class Google Drive, just in case anyone has forgotten.

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to work on composing your essay!

  • 750 words
  • at least 3 sources
  • at least 1 quote from each source
  • MLA format, including Works Cited page
  • No logical fallacies
  • Use of multiple persuasive appeals
  • Turned into the class Google Drive

Closing Session
About ten minutes before the class, I want everyone to stop and reread their own essay out loud to themselves (whisper, of course). This will help you make sure you don’t have any grammatical errors, typos, or awkward sentences.

Assessment
Formative (essay check in), Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, research help), product (varied length)

American Lit: Argumentative Essay Research Again!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented indifferent media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can research my chosen topic and compose my argumentative essay.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop! I want to come around and check in with everyone from yesterday and make sure we’re on the right track. I would also like to quickly review MLA formatting and how to do the Works Cited page in Word or using CitationMachine with Google Docs.

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to work on composing your essay!

  • 750 words
  • at least 3 sources
  • at least 1 quote from each source
  • MLA format, including Works Cited page
  • No logical fallacies
  • Use of multiple persuasive appeals
  • Turned into the class Google Drive

Closing Session
About ten minutes before the end of class, trade laptops with a buddy and review what your friend wrote. Give your partner some constructive feedback on their essay!

Assessment
Formative (essay check in), Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, research help), product (varied length)

Welcome to Wednesday!

Standard: W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

Learning Target: Students will get their first essay topic and begin to debate about it.

Activator: Mental Floss – 38 common errors in grammar and spelling

Today we’re going to get started on a little writing project! This will be your first essay grade. Remember that if you want to do well in this class – and you should – doing well on your essays is absolutely imperitive. So, let’s get started!

This first essay is an argumentative one. I’m going to present you with a situation in which there is no right (or wrong) answer. I want YOU to choose an answer, argue your point, and defend yourself!! Here’s the deal:

Who Gets the Heart?

Located at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, Wash., is the famous surgical team for heart transplants. It is the only medical hope of life for the people eligible for immediate transplants.

 

One problem associated with the transplant is that there are many more people who need it than there are available donors. Doctors examine all those with other diseases for whom this would be only a temporary solution. They turn over their list of recommended patients to the hospital administration. At present, the doctors have submitted the names of five people for one heart from a potential donor.

 

The committee assembled to make the decision has been given a brief biography of each person appearing on the list. It is assumed that each person has an equal chance of remaining alive if allowed the transplant. Thus, the committee is asked to decide which one of these may have first access to a donor heart.

 

You are a member of this committee. Remember, there is only one vacancy for a transplant, and you must fill it with one of these five people. The only medical information you have is that each equally needs the transplant. It is up to you.

 

Directions: Read over the information in the attached Biographical and Psychological reports. Make a decision based upon the information you have. YOU SHOULD HAVE AT LEAST TWO STRONG, CONVINCING REASONS FOR YOUR DECISION AND AT LEAST ONE REASON AGAINST EACH OF THE OTHER CANDIDATES. When you have your information in mind, complete an outline for an essay on this topic.

Heart Transplant Psychological Reports Sheet

 

 

In routine preadmission interviews the following patients were examined and evaluated as per the following data:

 

Alfred:

White American male, age 45, married for 21 years. Has two children (boy 18, girl 15). He is a research physicist at the University Medical School, working on a cancer immunization project. Current publications indicate that he is on the verge of a significant medical discovery Alfred is also on the health service staff of the local university member of county medical society member of the Rotary International, and Boy Scout leader for 10 years.

He is currently distraught about his physical condition and reports that it interferes with his work. Seems very committed to his work and appears to be legitimately on the verge of an important cancer discovery. It was hard for the staff to get him to talk about his work in terms they could understand.

Family relations seem strained and have been for some time because of his commitment to his work. The staff feels that he is a first-rate scientist and scholar who has contributed much and could contribute more to medical research. But they also believe him to be a mentally disturbed individual who, in time, will probably need psychiatric help.

 

Bill:

Black American male, age 27, married for 5 years. Has one child (girl 3) and wife is six months pregnant. He is currently employed as an auto mechanic in a local car dealership. Bill is attending night school and taking courses in rebuilding automatic transmissions. No community service activities listed. Plans to open an auto transmission repair shop upon completion of the trade school course.

He is an African-American that does not identify strongly with his heritage or with “black culture.” He is strongly devoted to his family and appears to be an excellent husband and father.

Bill’s capacity for growth in his chosen occupation, however, seems limited. His high school record was poor, although he had no record of delinquency and was always regarded by his teachers as a student who tried hard. Therefore, he will probably not succeed with his business plans and will remain employed, permanently at a fixed rate.

His wife is trained as a legal secretary Her prognosis for employment is good, although Bill has discouraged her from seeking work because he wants her to be a full-time mother. Bill seems unaware of the serious implications of his illness.

 

Cora:

White American female, age 30, married for 11 years. Has Five children (boy 10, boy 8, girl 7, girl 5, and girl 4 months). Husband self-employed (owns and operates a tavern and short-order restaurant). She is a high school graduate, but has never been employed. The couple has just purchased a home in the local suburbs and Cora is planning the interior to determine whether she has the talent to return to school for courses in interior decorating. Cora is a member of several religious organizations.

One of the staff members evaluating Cora described her as a “professional Jew.” She is president of the local Hadassah organization and seems to be able to talk about nothing but her religion and her children. Although her recently found interest in interior decorating may be a sign of change, it was not clear to the staff whether this interest was real or only generated artificially when she heard of the interview requirement. Cora seems resigned to her illness and likely death. Her husband works long hours, is in good health, and enjoys the respect and love of his children. Cora’s mother, who also lives with the family, handles most of the childcare.

 

David:

Hispanic American male, age 19, single, but recently announced engagement and plans to marry this summer. He is currently a sophomore at a large eastern university majoring in philosophy and literature. He is fluent in Spanish. Eventually he hopes to earn his Ph.D. and become a college professor. David is a member of several campus political organizations; an outspoken critic of the college administration; was once suspended briefly for “agitation;” has had poetry published “in various literature magazines around the New York area. David’s father is self-employed (owns a lawn care business), mother is deceased, and has two younger sisters ages 15 and 11.

Typical student activist, David is a bright, almost straight “A” student who enjoys the respect of most of his teachers and friends. He appears confused about his future, however and demonstrates a penchant for jeopardizing it by involving himself in various student causes. Indeed, his college dean of student affairs regards him as an individual who will “demonstrate for anything.”

David is bitter, almost paranoid, about his illness. His father has invested a good deal of money, time, and emotion in him and has always hoped that David would become a lawyer His relations with his father are strained, however, and he seems only mildly concerned about his two sisters, although they still think highly of him. His future father-in-law, who is a highly successful businessman, expects him to enter the family enterprise upon college graduation.

 

Edna:

Black American female, age 34, single, currently employed as an executive in a large manufacturing company where she has worked since college graduation. Member of local choral society; was alto soloist in Christmas production of Handel’s Messiah. Edna has been very active in several church and charitable groups.

She is a self-contained, inner-directed woman and a model of the “career woman.” It was clear to the staff that her natural aggressiveness and combative tendencies worked against any sort of marital attachment.

Edna’s employers regard her as indispensable. Her work record is superb and her activities in church and charitable groups have been effective. She is well regarded by all who know her, although she seems to have few, if any, close friends.

 

The Thursday Complex

Standard: RI.9-10.5. Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

Learning Target: Students will read an article about the Oedipal complex and complete a margin-marking activity, then begin brainstorming for their persuasive essay.

Activator: The Who – Baba O’Riley

Today we’re going to do that margin-marking thing again :D Remember this from a week or so ago? It was when we made little symbols in the margins of an article to think our way through it, and then we talked about it. Here’s the breakdown:

  • Put a * next to anything you think would be worth discussing with the class. (3)
  • Put a ? next to anything that confuses you or that you have questions about. (2)
  • Put a ! next to any statement with which you strongly agree. (1)
  • Put a X next to any statement with which you strongly disagree.(1)

Right! So today’s article is about this thing called the oedipal complex, which basically says that all people have an inherent jealousy of their same-gender parent and an inherent desire to be with someone like their opposite-gender parent. This is where the idea that all women marry men exactly like their fathers come from… have you guys heard of that before? Anyway, as with most things in psychology, there is some debate as to whether or not this phenomenon is legit. So today we’re going to read an article that doesn’t look so much at people who might experience the oedipal complex, but that looks at the play and examines whether the oedipal complex exists at all. Sound fun? Cool!

After that, we’re going to talk about our persuasive essay for this unit. Here’s the gist of it:

Argumentative: What does it mean to suffer? Is suffering truly universal? In the book Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy says “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” In contrast, however, Martin Luther King Jr. said that everyone suffers: “Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals.” What do you think? Does the current generation suffer more or from worse things than past generations have – in other words, is life for you worse than it was for your parents? Teenagers often think that their life is harder than anyone else’s life has ever been, and likewise, adults often think that their own youth was a much simpler, easier time. What is your opinion? Does life continue to get worse and worse, or does everyone suffer to the same degree?

Due date: Tuesday, May 14th, 2012. Absolutely NO ESSAYS WILL BE ACCEPTED EVEN FOR LATE CREDIT after Friday, May 17th.

Write an essay in which you respond to the above questions. Your essay should meet the following criteria:

  • At least 750 words.
  • MLA Formatting
  • Formal Style – no 1st person, contractions, slang, etc.
  • You should answer all of the questions posed to you on the other side of this sheet in a full and complete manner. Remember to respond to the prompt, not just write how awful your life is.
  • Proper grammar and conventions, and stylistically engaging.
  • Your essay must be submitted on or before the due date. Late essays will not be accepted, as I will not have time to grade them before the semester is over.

We’ll go over the essay requirements and then I’ll give you guys some time to brainstorm and start getting your ideas down on paper, which we’ll probably do with a circle map. Tomorrow we’ll do another article that should help you in your stormbraining, and then next week is all about wrapping up loose ends!