Tag Archive for bubble map

World Lit: Hopefully, it’s textbook time!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Learning Target: I can identify and analyze the skills and knowledge required to complete Embedded Assessment 1 successfully.

Opening Session: After we complete our 20 minutes of Independent Reading, we’re going to first assign textbooks! I’m going to assign you a numbered book, but this book is YOURS, so feel free to decorate it any way you like. Sharpies work best – washable markers will smear all over. Note: We may not have textbooks yet! If not, we will pull up the activities online and work from there.

After we get textbooks, we’re going to flip to page 4 and complete activity 1.1, Previewing the Unit, and preview our Cultural Identity unit, as well as the first Embedded Assessment.

Work Session: After we finish 1.1 in the text, we’re going to continue on to 1.2, discussing how our cultural identity creates a lens through which we see the world. Included in this lesson is writing a brief constructed response (aka short essay).

As we finish our Work Session today, I would like for you to trade essays with a classmate and give your buddy any feedback you have on their writing.

Closing Session: We will end today with the final bit of activity 1.2, and discuss our classroom norms (aka rules). Effective communication is important, and I want each of your voices to be heard in class!

Differentiation: Process (scaffolded essay); product (modified essay length).

Assessment: Constructed Responses may be graded.

World Lit: Act IV, the home stretch!

Standard:

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand act IV of Julius Caesar and analyze the motives of one of the main characters in a story by using a bubble map to describe him.

Opening Session: Daily video! This will preview Act IV and Act V of Julius Caesar, and provide a humorous and simple perspective on the various characters in the play.

Work Session: Today we are continuing with our reading of Julius Caesar by reading act IV. No lie, the book is kind of downhill after act III. I mean, they fight a war and all, but aside from that nothing happens. In other words, the climax of the story was definitely Caesar’s death and funeral last act. I also want to point out to you today that Shakespeare violates the bajeezes out of something called the classical unities – that is, the play should take place in one general spot (unity of place), it shouldn’t span more than a day or so (unity of time), and there should be very few if any subplots (unity of action). Shakespeare basically throws those out the window. Anyway, get ready to read your parts again today!!!

As we finish reading act IV today, I’d like you guys to pick a character and work on describing them. Make a bubble map – I’ll make an example on the board for you – write your character’s name in the center and five adjectives that describe your character in the bubbles around it.

You may choose from Caesar, Brutus, Cassius, Casca, or Antony.

Closing Session: Think-pair-share with a partner who used a DIFFERENT character than you did – then share with the group the adjectives your partner chose to describe his or her character. Differentiation: Process, interest, readiness (different length reading parts based on readiness and interest); Interest, product (choice of character for bubble map.)
Assessment: Bubble maps will be graded

Act V: The Grand Finale

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: I can finish reading Julius Caesar and understand why the characters died in the way that they did; I can discuss my feelings about the play with my classmates.

Opening Session: THUGNOTES! This will recap the entire play and give you some analysis on it as well.

Work Session: Today we’re finishing up reading Julius Caesar by reading Act V! Yay! After this we’ve read the entire play! Which, personally, I think is pretty cool

As we read Act V, I want you to take note of how everyone starts to die – not just the fact that everyone is dying, but HOW they do it. You’ll notice that each character chooses his own time and means of death, and there’s lots of discussion of honor and who is more honorable and taking the honor and…what’s all this about honor?

We will pause in the reading after each major death and discuss these things.

Closing Session:

When we finish reading the play and it’s all said and done, I want you guys to write a little paragraph for me:

Ticket out the door: Why did the Romans consider suicide to be more honorable than dying in battle? How is that different than what we think today? Why do you think it is so different?

Differentiation:

Process, readiness, interest (different length reading parts).

Assessment:

TOTDs will be summatively assessed, formative checks for understanding during class discussion.

Act IV: We’re in the Home Stretch!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand act IV of Julius Caesar and analyze the motives of one of the main characters in a story by using a bubble map to describe him.

Opening Session: Daily video! This will preview Act IV and Act V of Julius Caesar, and provide a humorous and simple perspective on the various characters in the play.

Work Session:

Today we are continuing with our reading of Julius Caesar by reading act IV. No lie, the book is kind of downhill after act III. I mean, they fight a war and all, but aside from that nothing happens. In other words, the climax of the story was definitely Caesar’s death and funeral last act. I also want to point out to you today that Shakespeare violates the bajeezes out of something called the classical unities – that is, the play should take place in one general spot (unity of place), it shouldn’t span more than a day or so (unity of time), and there should be very few if any subplots (unity of action). Shakespeare basically throws those out the window.

Anyway, get ready to read your parts again today!!!

As we finish reading act IV today, I’d like you guys to pick a character and work on describing them. Make a bubble map – I’ll make an example on the board for you – write your character’s name in the center and five adjectives that describe your character in the bubbles around it.

You may choose from Caesar, Brutus, Cassius, Casca, or Antony.

Closing Session:

Think-pair-share with a partner who used a DIFFERENT character than you did – then share with the group the adjectives your partner chose to describe his or her character.

Differentiation:

Process, interest, readiness (different length reading parts based on readiness and interest); Interest, product (choice of character for bubble map.)

Assessment:

Bubble maps will be graded

Gilgatuesday!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: I will read and understand the first half of The Epic of Gilgamesh selection from our text, and make a bubble map to cite evidence explaining who the main character is..

Activator: Star Trek: The Next Generation – Jean Luc Picard discusses Gilgamesh.

 

Work Session: So, after watching our snazzy video today, we’re going to dive into reading Gilgamesh! Are you excited? YOU SHOULD BE!

Just in case any of you guys are reading from home or ISS or something, here is a link to the full text of Gilgamesh. We’re reading excerpts from this text in our book – you want to search in the PDF for The Battle with Humbaba, The Death of Enkidu, The Story of the Flood, and The Return.

Epic of Gilgamesh, Translated by N.K. Sandars

And today we’re going to read the first two of those sections, plus the prologue. Afterward, we’re going to talk about the things that make Gilgamesh into an archetypal hero. What’s that? Archetype?

ar·che·type/ˈärk(i)ˌtīp/

Noun:
  1. A very typical example of a certain person or thing.
  2. An original that has been imitated.

Anyway, to discuss who and what Gilgamesh is, let’s make…dundunDUN!!! A BUBBLE MAP!!!!

I would like each of you to make a bubble map to explain who Gilgamesh is. That means you put Gilgamesh’s name in the center of the bubble map and write adjectives in the bubbles around it. All these adjectives should describe Gilgamesh. I want you to have at least five. For those of you that are new to this whole thinking map thing, here’s what a bubble map looks like:


Who doesn’t love ice cream?

Now, here’s the catch. For each of your adjectives, I want you to prove to me how you know this. And you’ll do so with evidence in the form of quotes from the story. That means you have to look in the book and find five quotes that tell you who Gilgamesh is as a character. You’ll have the rest of class to work on this, and then at the very end we’ll partner up and share 🙂

Closing Session: Ticket out the door: Think-pair-share your bubble map with a partner and then with the class.

Assessment: Bubble maps can be formatively checked for understanding.

Differentiation: Process (printed maps provided)