Tag Archive for creative writing

World Lit: Writing a Personal Narrative

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can write a narrative in any genre about an incident, real or imagined, that conveys a cultural perspective.

Opening Session: Let’s review very quickly while you guys get your laptops! What are the following genres: memoir, short story, poetry, graphic novel, personal essay?

Work Session: Let’s get started working on your EA1!! You have until the end of class on Wednesday to work on this. I want you to be completely finished and turned in to the class Google drive by the end of class on Wednesday!

Closing Session: Return your laptops to the cart!

Assessment: Formal (EA1)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Product, Choice

World Lit: Argumentation in “An Indian Father’s Plea”

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Learning Target: I can analyze the structure of an argument and how an author builds their argument.

Opening Session: Cherokee Language

Work Session: Today we’re reading a story called “An Indian Father’s Plea,” and although I know we’ve read a lot about India, this is actually about Native Americans, so switch your mode of thinking!!

After we read this text (which is long!) I want you guys to consider your own beginnings – your first days of kindergarten. Think back to that time in your life, and using the same argumentation techniques that Lake used in his letter, write a letter about yourself going into Kindergarten.

You’ll have the rest of the class to do this!

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!! AND BOOK CHECK!

Assessment: Formal – vocab quiz, Informal – book check

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Interest (student life)

World Lit: Author’s Storybook: Pacing

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can analyze the narrative technique writers use to create a sense of pacing in a narrative and apply pacing to my own writing.

Opening Session: Grab the narrative you wrote yesterday- you’re going to use it again today! Take ten minutes to read over it and remember what you wrote 🙂

Work Session: Today we’re going to read a story called “Pick One” by David Matthews and consider the issue of pacing in writing. You know how some TV shows or movies are really fast-paced, and others seem to drag? It’s the same in writing. The series I’ve been reading during Independent Reading time, The Demon Cycle, is generally lauded for being really fast-paced and action packed. By contrast, another favorite book of mine, The Name of the Wind, is very slow-paced. I can read you example passages of each that demonstrate this 🙂 As we read our short story today, listen for shifts in the pacing and how the author achieved that.

After we read, go back to the narrative you wrote yesterday. How did you pace your writing? Fast, slow, or otherwise? Did you do it intentionally?

Consider what we’ve read today, then let’s do the Sentence Variety box on page 132, and then look to page 134, and use your own writing to find different types of sentences. You can work with your story to include a variety of sentence structures, which will make your writing stronger.

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!!

Assessment: Informal – book check, vocab quiz

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Product (varied lengths)

 

World Lit: Author’s Stylebook: Dialogue, Continued

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target:  I can write a narrative using direct and indirect dialogue.

Opening Session: Sub attendance, get your books!

Work Session: Today you guys are going to continue the activity we started yesterday, learning about dialogue. Your assignment today is to flip to page 128 in your book and complete the narrative writing prompt. Your narrative can be about any memorable experience from your childhood, but it must include dialogue!! I don’t usually like to write dialogue much, so this assignment would be a big challenge for me!

Your assignment is due at the end of class; turn it in to the sub!

Closing Session: Thank the sub and pick up the room, please! Don’t forget to study for vocab tomorrow!

Assessment: Informal (narratives checked for completion/effort)

Differentiation: Product (varied lengths)

World Lit: Author’s Storybook: Dialogue

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can write a narrative using direct and indirect dialogue.

Opening Session: Flip to page 122 in your book. Working with a partner, generate as many different words for “said” as you can think of in the next five minutes. (Sorry, Stephen King fans!)

Work Session: Today it’s all about dialogue and stories!! Let’s read this story “Kaffir Boy” by Mark Mathabane. Today we will read the text and work on the Second Read questions on page 125-126. As we read, I would also like you to circle all the dialogue tags (other than “said”).

Closing Session: Go back to your list you made in the opening session. Can you add anything new to it? Let’s share out our words, and whomever has the most unique words will win the day!!

Assessment: Informal (Book check)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding, partnerships)