Tag Archive for debate

American Lit: The Road to Success, continued

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can critique two arguments, and defend, challenge, or qualify statements in an argument to help me revise my working definition of the American Dream.

Opening Session: Reviewing the powerful speech we read yesterday:

Work Session: Today we’re continuing to read the Road to Success activity in your text. Flip to page 97, “The Right To Fail,” and let’s read it together as a class!

After reading, I want you guys to do the Structured Academic Controversy on page 100 in your book.

The topic is the same as the one you will work on for your essay next week, “Does American Still Provide Access to the American Dream”. We will split into two groups and each side needs to defend their position – side A, “No, the American Dream no longer exists,” or side B, “Yes, the American Dream is still a reality.”

Closing Session:When we finish debating, you can go ahead and start a little drafting or pre-writing for your essay. Tomorrow we will be reading an example of an essay on the same topic from your textbook.

Assessment: Formal – “conversations” will be graded

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding, volunteer readers)

AP Lang: Debate Time!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12SL3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will debate on a controversial topic, with a focus on using valid, logical reasoning and avoiding logical fallacies.

Opening Session
Those of you who are going today, take ten minutes to prepare. Everyone else, get out a sheet of paper and be ready to write your responses to the debates!

Work Session
It’s DEBATE TIME! Again, here is how we will structure the debates:

  • Coin flip to see if pro or con goes first
  • Approximately one minute “opening statement” from each side (about a page of writing)
    Whoever went first gets to respond to the other side’s points, and then vice versa.
  • Approximately one minute closing statement from each side (about a page of writing – For partners, if you gave the opening statement, your partner must give the closing statement).

After our debates, take a couple minutes to write a short response. Who do you think won and why? Which arguments were most persuasive and why? Did you hear any logical fallacies?

Closing Session
Let’s draw for who will go next! Next SIX will be going on Thursday morning (our half day)!

Assessment
Formative (debate)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topics)

AP Lang: Let’s Get Ready To Debate!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12SL3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will research and draft arguments to debate on a controversial topic, with a focus on using valid, logical reasoning and avoiding logical fallacies.

Opening Session
Review! Let’s go over the fallacies and persuasive appeals again. And let me ask a question: Which do you think would be most useful in a debate? Because we’re going to be having debates this week!

Work Session
I’m going to pass around a sign up sheet for our debates this week! Here’s the deal:

You will choose either PRO (in favor of) or CON (against) side for your debate topic. You CAN have ONE PARTNER, but you do not have to – and you definitely can’t have more than one partner.

If you choose to have a partner in your debate, you must both speak EQUALLY – no one is allowed to be silent during the debate.

We will be having our debates in class over the next three days. You’ll have the rest of this class period to research your topic and form your argument. Here’s how the debate will be structured:

  • Coin flip to see if pro or con goes first
  • Approximately one minute “opening statement” from each side (about a page of writing)
  • Whoever went first gets to respond to the other side’s points, and then vice versa.
  • Approximately one minute closing statement from each side (about a page of writing – For partners, if you gave the opening statement, your partner must give the closing statement).

You should write out your intro and closing statements, as well as a page-ish of points you think the opposition will make and how you can respond to them.

You have the rest of class to research and put your debate together. GO!

Which side of the argument would you like to make a speech for period 3

Closing Session
Check in! How prepared are you feeling? I’m going to cut apart the sign up sheet and draw debates from a hat. The first five will go TOMORROW!

Assessment
Formative (debate prep check in)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topics)

World Lit: Dante Circle 4: Greed

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will understand circle 4 of Dante’s Inferno and how the punishment fits the law of symbolic retribution; I will participate in a collaborative discussion with my classmates about greed.

Opening Session
Today we’re studying greed – the avaricious and prodigal, or in other words, those who hoard (keep everything) and those who squander (waste everything). We’re going to start out with a Shmoop summary of this circle, since we aren’t reading it out of the book. Next, we are going to have a little debate!!

Work Session
You may have noticed that the desks are in rows that face each other with an aisle between you. Today we’re going to have a stone throwing debate! Because the punishment in circle 4 is to push giant rocks into one another, you’re going to be doing something similar with your papers. I’ve got a sheet with 5 questions on it for each of you. You’re going to have 5 minutes to write on any one of the questions. Then, you’re going to crumble up your paper and throw it at the person across from you, just like the sinners in circle 4 did. When you get the paper your partner throws at you, unfold it, and you’ll have 5 minutes to either write about a new question OR respond to your partner’s
writing.

We will swap papers 4 times. After that, you should find your own paper, flatten it out, and you can respond to what everyone else wrote and get the last word. Then it’s time to turn them in!

Closing Session
Ticket out the door – choose your poster activity for the day and complete it, then hang it on the board.

Assessment
Formative (TOTD, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (guided notes); Product (choice of poster activity)

World Lit: Justice and Culture, Day 1

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Learning Target: I can analyze and synthesize details from two texts about justice.

Opening Session: So far this unit we’ve focused on cultural perspective told through stories and narratives. For the remainder, we will focus on cultural perspective through argumentation. And you guessed it – that means we will be writing an argument! So let’s start this unit by unpacking Embedded Assessment 2, The Counterargument Assignment!

Work Session: Today we’re going to start out with a little pre-reading activity on page 177 in your Springboard. I would like for us to complete the chart by yourself, then we will go over it aloud.

We’re going to be reading two articles about something controversial that happened way back in 1994, the Michael Fay case. As the background info in the book explains, the controversy was about whether or not an American citizen should be beaten (caned, technically) for a crime he committed in Singapore. Although this type of punishment can be considered “torture,” there is no denying that Singapore has a much lower crime rate than the United States.

We will read the first article today, “Time to Assert American Values”. After reading, I want you guys to do the Second Read questions, and I also want to examine the author’s argument. What points did he make? Can you make any arguments that refute those points, or explain why they are wrong?

Tomorrow we will read the next article in the book, which takes the opposing viewpoint, and have a little silent debate!

Closing Session: Share out! What do you think?

Assessment: Informal (book check)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Student Choice