Tag Archive for figurative language

Storyboard Tuesday!

Standards

RL.9-10.5 – Common Core State Standards

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

L.9-10.5 – Common Core State Standards

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.6 – Common Core State Standards

Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

Activator

Oedipus…
Resources:

 

 

 

Learning Target

Scholars will preview Oedipus Rex by making a storyboard of the events. They will place the events of the play in the order in which they happen and then do an illustrative storyboard.
 

Work Session

Welcome to Tuesday, y’all! Today we’re going to do a little bit of previewing of Oedipus. I’m going to give each table a set of slips of paper filled with the events of the play Oedipus Rex. They are all mixed up – your job as a group is to put the slips in order. When you finish, I would like for you to use a sheet of paper to illustrate a storyboard for the play. Stick figures are fine 🙂

After we finish that, I want to go over some vocab for this unit! We’re going to be studying figurative language along with the play we’re reading. So, I’ve got ANOTHER SCHWIFTY POWERPOINT to show you! Because apparently this is PowerPoint Appreciation Week. Yeesh.

Anyway, take some notes because you can bet your bottom dollar this stuff will be on your test!
Resources:

 

Closing Session

Riddle time!

I live above a star, but I do not burn.
I have 11 friends, but they do not turn.
I am visited in sequence: never, once, or repeatedly.
My initials are PQRS.

What am I?
 

Assessment

Informal assessment, grading of storyboards.
 

Differentiation

Students can work on storyboards visually, cloze or scaffolded notes if needed.

It’s figuratively Wednesday

Welcome back to midweek, everyone! So close to summer break I can taste it!

Standard: RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Learning Target: Students will read and understand the poem “Jocasta,” then go on a scavenger hunt for literary devices.

Activator: Weezer – (If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To

First things first: let’s learn some figurative language!!! I’ve got a cool powerpoint that goes over thirteen literary devices and their meanings, along with examples. We’re going to start off today with taking some quick notes on these (they should be, mostly, review!) and then we’re going to find some examples of these devices in poetry!!

So, as we read Oedipus, the play focused on the main character and his reactions and feelings. But here’s a question for you guys – what do you think about Jocasta? She was totally innocent in all this…well, sort of, she did give her baby up to be killed… but for the most part, she didn’t really do anything wrong, right? So today, we’re going to look at things from Jocasta’s point of view.

I’ll give every table 2 copies of the poem “Jocasta” by Ruth F. Eisenberg. One of your copies will have a pink highlighted part and the other copy will have a green highlighted part.

I want you to nominate one reader from your table to be Jocasta. She will read the pink highlighted part. The rest of you will read as the Chorus, on the green highlighted part.

These two parts alternate in the poem to tell the complete story of Oedipus from Jocasta’s point of view. What do you guys think of this? How do you feel about things as Jocasta saw them, since she was totally innocent in all this? Or..was she?

After we finish our reading, we’re going to do a li’l’ scavenger hunt! Excited? I know I am, wooo!!!

We have studied thirteen literary devices. I would like you to find examples of ten in “Jocasta.” You can work with your group. All thirteen devices are present in the poem, but you will only need to find 10. Write the name of the device and the example down from the poem on a sheet of notebook paper numbered 1-10. For example, you might write “1. Metaphor – “My life is a toad.””

Jocasta’s Wednesday

Welcome back to midweek, everyone! So close to winter break I can taste it!

Standard: RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Learning Target: Students will read and understand the poem “Jocasta,” then go on a scavenger hunt for literary devices.

Activator: Weezer – (If You’re Wondering If I Want You To) I Want You To

So, as we read Oedipus, the play focused on the main character and his reactions and feelings. But here’s a question for you guys – what do you think about Jocasta? She was totally innocent in all this…well, sort of, she did give her baby up to be killed… but for the most part, she didn’t really do anything wrong, right? So today, we’re going to look at things from Jocasta’s point of view.

I’ll give every table 2 copies of the poem “Jocasta” by Ruth F. Eisenberg. One of your copies will have a pink highlighted part and the other copy will have a green highlighted part.

I want you to nominate one reader from your table to be Jocasta. She will read the pink highlighted part. The rest of you will read as the Chorus, on the green highlighted part.

These two parts alternate in the poem to tell the complete story of Oedipus from Jocasta’s point of view. What do you guys think of this? How do you feel about things as Jocasta saw them, since she was totally innocent in all this? Or..was she?

After we finish our reading, we’re going to do a li’l’ scavenger hunt! Excited? I know I am, wooo!!!

We have studied thirteen literary devices. I would like you to find examples of ten in “Jocasta.” You can work with your group. All thirteen devices are present in the poem, but you will only need to find 10. Write the name of the device and the example down from the poem on a sheet of notebook paper numbered 1-10. For example, you might write “1. Metaphor – “My life is a toad.””

Sound good? Here are the devices again:

  1. Metaphor
  2. Simile
  3. Personification
  4. Synecdoche
  5. Metonymy
  6. Hyperbole
  7. Allusion
  8. Apostrophe
  9. Assonance
  10. Consonance
  11. Onomatopoeia
  12. Slant Rhyme
  13. Alliteration

 

The Tragic Tuesday Ending…

Standard: RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: Students will finish reading Oedipus and write an impromptu essay about the play.

Activator: Weezer – In The Garage

Welcome back to class, everyone! I hope your week has started off well 🙂

Today we’re going to finish reading Oedipus the King, the same way we’ve been reading it so far. Afterwards, I’d like you guys to do a short writing assignment before we review our figurative language. Here’s the deal, and… guess what! You have a choice!!

Option A: Pretend you are Oedipus. Before you blind yourself, write a letter to the people of Thebes explaining what has happened. Do you feel guilty? Should you have listened to the prophet? What advice do you have for the people you used to rule? How are you going to punish yourself for what you’ve done and why? Give me 2-4 paragraphs, and don’t forget to put it in letter format!

Option B: We talked several times about the tragic flaw in Oedipus, which, in this case, was hubris. Hubris is an extreme pride and way of thinking that you’re better than everyone else or exempt from the same restraints as everyone else. How would the story of Oedipus differed if he had not had this tragic flaw? Write a  summary in 2-4 paragraphs where you explain how Oedipus the King would have turned out if he had not had this tragic flaw.

You guys will have about half an hour to do this, depending on how long it takes us to read. After we finish writing, we’ll do a quick review of our figurative language. That’s Tuesday! Tomorrow…more poetry!

Tuesdaypus the King

Welcome to Tuesday! Only 17 days left until the end of the semester!

Standard: RL.9-10.10. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

Learning Target: Students will begin readingOedipus and continue learning about figurative language with example poetry.

Activator: “We’re Not Gonna Take It” by Twisted Sister

So first things first, regarding our music video, what do you guys think the title means? What is the artist referring to when he says “We’re not gonna take it”? Take what?

Today we’re going to begin our anchor text for the unit,Oedipus the King. I previewed this story for you yesterday, but in case you missed it here’s the skinny: Dude named Oedipus was prophesied to kill his father and marry his mother. Mom, Dad, and Oedipus all knew this was foretold, but for some reason Oedipus missed the boat on the  “Maybe I should refrain from killing or marrying anyone” concept and despite all their precautions it ends up happening. Oh, and Oedipus and Jocasta, his wife/mom, have four kids together. You can see how well this is working out…

So, our play picks up as Oedipus is living his happy life with his lovely wife, and then he begins to figure out what’s happened. Oh boy. Talk about some Maury-show drama. Because this is a play, we’re going to read it out loud. I will need volunteers  for Oedipus, Jocasta, Creon, Teiresias, a Priest, First and Second Messengers, and a Herdsman. Everyone else who does not have a part will read together as the Chorus. The Chorus is a particular aspect of Greek plays, and it’s always a group of people chillin’ together that read things like background information. They sort of represent the voice of the audience, kind of like a laugh track on a modern sitcom. Only they say more. A lot more.

After we read half of part I of the play, we’re going to swap gears a little and talk about poetry! Specifically, we’ll talk about the sonnet. There are two types of sonnets, and we’re going to read them both. The first is the Italian or Petrarchan sonnet. The form was perfected by a dude named Petrarch, and we’ll read one of his poems today, “Spring” (page 733 in your book.) As we read, we’ll be looking for those literary devices we talked about yesterday. After that, we’ll do the same with the other type of sonnet, which is called English or Shakespearean. We’ll read Sonnet 116 on page 741 in your book, which is by Shakespeare, and is about love. Aaah, love.

And that’s Tuesday! Sounds like fun, right? We’ll see you all tomorrow!