Tag Archive for flood myths

World Lit: Flood Comparison Essay, Day 2

Standards
ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.e Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will finish writing their essay comparing and contrasting the two flood stories we have read in class, and analyzing why they are so similar.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop again! I’ll review how to upload your files to the class google drive so that you’re ready to go whenever you finish typing 🙂

Work Session
Today we’re going to have the entire class period to finish your essay on the two flood stories. Here is the prompt again:

In a well organized essay of about 500 words, compare and contrast the two flood stories and analyze why you think they are so similar. You can use the articles we read on Friday as additional sources. You should cite quotes from at least 3 of your 4 available sources (Gilgamesh, Noah, and the two articles we read). You should explain to your reader both the similarities and differences in the stories, AND you should analyze WHY the two pieces are so similar.

Your essay will be due at the end of class TODAY. If you and a friend both finish early, it would be a good idea to trade essays with them and review each others’ work.

Closing Session
One more chance to upload your essays to the class google drive! I’ll show you again on the board. Remember that I will NOT accept printed, emailed, or shared documents – only uploads to the drive!

Assessment Strategies
Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding)

World Lit: Flood Comparison Essay, Day 1

Standards
ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples
appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and
concepts. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.e Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will begin to write an essay comparing and contrasting the two flood stories we have read in class, and analyzing why they are so similar.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop! I want to quickly go over how to set up your paper in MLA format with the correct font, spacing, and heading. I’ll also review how to save your work under your student number so you can upload it to our class google drive.

Work Session
Okay! Today we’re going to begin writing our first essay together. I want you to take a closer look at the two flood stories we’ve read together, the flood from Gilgamesh and the flood from Genesis. As we’ve discussed, both stories are very similar, but they do have some minor differences. Also, there is some major controversy surrounding which story came first.

In a well organized essay of about 500 words, compare and contrast the two flood stories and analyze why you think they are so similar. You can use the articles we read on Friday as additional sources. You should cite quotes from at least 3 of your 4 available sources (Gilgamesh, Noah, and the two articles we read). You should explain to your reader both the similarities and differences in the stories, AND you should analyze WHY the two pieces are so similar.

Your essay will be due at the end of class tomorrow. Although there is not a required number of paragraphs, you should know that 500 words is about 4 or 5 paragraphs, depending on how long you make them.

Closing Session
To close out the day, I’ll call your attention back to the board and show everyone how to upload your essay to the class google drive, tinyurl.com/BristowWorldLit. This will be how you turn in all your essays for my class.

Assessment Strategies
Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding)

World Lit: The Flood of Noah and the Flood of Utnapishtim

Standards
ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and
developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will read Noah’s flood story from Genesis and then anylyze two articles that draw different conclusions from comparisons of the same texts.

Activator
Noah’s Ark Disney Storybook Video:

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading another flood story, much like the one we read yesterday, but this one might be a little more familiar to you. The story is from Genesis, chapters 6-9, and is the story of Noah’s Ark.

We’re going to read the story aloud together, and then do a quick discussion just to make sure everyone knows what’s going on. Afterwards, I want us to consider how the two flood stories we’ve read over the past couple days are similar or different. We can make a venn diagram, or we can just talk about it 🙂

I have two articles for you guys to read. The first is entitled “The Flood of Noah and the Flood of Gilgamesh” and comes to us from the Institute for Creation Research (http://www.icr.org/article/noah-flood-gilgamesh/). The second is called “Before Noah: Flood Myths Are Older Than the Bible” and is from Time Magazine (http://time.com/44631/noah-christians-flood-aronofsky/). These articles both compare the two versions of the flood story and draw two different conclusions.

Why do you think these articles read the same stories and interpreted them in vastly different ways? What was each article’s intended audience? Do you think anyone reading either article changed their minds about which story came first?

Closing Session
To close out today, I want everyone to grab a sheet of paper (a half sheet is fine) and write a short paragraph on these two articles. Analyze the author’s motives and purpose in writing these two articles, consider if either author is biased, and theorize why they come to two exact opposite conclusions.

Assessment
Formative (paragraphs, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning styles)

True Life: Flood Stories

Standard:

§  ELAGSE9-10RI7 Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person’s life story in print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account.

Learning Target:  I will analyze various accounts of modern floods and use that information to create a survivor’s journal or a flood safety pamphlet.

Opening Session: A look back: Hurricane Katrina News Coverage

Work Session: Welcome to Monday, everyone!

Before we get started today, let me draw your attention to today’s bell schedule – you might notice it’s all kinds of weird. We will be doing weird bell schedules for the rest of the semester, so my recommendation to you is to bring snacks, because you’re probably not going to eat lunch at the time you’re used to.

Anyway…

As you might have guessed from the daily video, today we’re going to continue talking about flood stories. The difference today, though, is that we’re talking about floods that actually happened. We’re going to talk a bit more about Hurricane Katrina, as well as the Japanese tsunami of 2011, and the Indian Ocean Tsunami (the Christmas Tsunami) of 2004. All these massive floods are pretty close to current, right? So I thought these articles and pictures might hit home for you guys.

http://www.livescience.com/22522-hurricane-katrina-facts.html

http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/08/28/hurricane.katrina/

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/03/pictures/110315-nuclear-reactor-japan-tsunami-earthquake-world-photos-meltdown/

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/12/1227_041226_tsunami.html

http://www.nichols.edu/departments/physicalworld/tsunami/indian_ocean_tsunami.htm

After we read the articles together as a class and have a bit of discussion about what it might have been like, I would like for you guys do to a bit of narrative writing for me in the form of a journal.

Flood Journal Assignment

1.     Choose one of the modern flood stories we talked about in class – Hurricane Katrina, the Japanese Tsunami, or the Christmas Tsunami.

2.     Pretend you’re in the middle of that flood as it’s happening.

3.     IN PEN, write three journal or diary entries from three days as you experience what it was like to live through that flood. Each entry should be about 2 paragraphs long. Don’t forget to sign your name at the end.

4.     When you’re finished, turn in your journal to me.

OR

Flood Safety Pamphlet Assignment

1.     Pretend you’re on the city committee for public safety.

2.     Think about an “action plan” for your city if a mega flood happens

3.     Draw a brochure to be distributed to the people of your city that will give them important safety info on what to do in the event of a flood

4.     Make it creative, neat, and colorful!

5.     Turn it in when you’re done 

…And that’s that! Be creative with your journal entries, guys! After I grade them, we’re going to have some fun making them into “flood” artifacts.

I’ll see y’all tomorrow!!

Closing Session: Book Talk – The Hunger Games

Assessment: Flood journal or pamphlet will be graded

Differentiation: Product (student choice); process (partners allowed).

DIY Flood Thursday

Standard:

§  ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can write a narrative to develop an imagined event, creating my own flood myth for the modern era.

Opening Session: Ancient Chinese Great Flood Myth

Work Session: Welcome back! Today we are going to start off with a 20-30 minute jaunt into the computer lab to do our next formative assessment. Remember, go to http://www.socrative.com and then click “Student Login.” Put in the room name BRISTOWLIT and then your name, and make sure you do LastName, FirstName. Then take the quiz!

After that, we’re going to return to the classroom and everyone is going to draw a flood myth from a hat. Wait, what? Yep! You heard that right! So not only are there flood stories from Christianity/Judaism/Islam and from Gilgamesh and from ancient China, there are actually flood stories from almost every culture in the whole world! And today you’re going to get a chance to read one and then write your own!

As you write your own flood story, please keep the following requirements in mind:

  • §  Your story must have a flood that destroys everything
  • §  Your flood must have at least one survivor who has to rebuild the world
  • §  You need to include the reason the gods decided to destroy the world with a flood
  • §  You need to include one “inspiration” detail from the flood story you drew out of my hat (ie the survivors in the story you chose took refuge in a tree; the survivors in the story you write do the same thing).
  • §  You should include a color illustration
  • §  Be neat and creative, because we will hang these up in the hallway!!!

You will have the remainder of class to work on your own flood story. Put a lot of effort into this one!

Closing Session: Book talk – It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini.

Assessment: Flood myths will be graded

Differentiation: Process (partner option), product (visuals or comic versions permitted as needed