Tag Archive for hysteria

AP Lang: Hysteria!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze the theme of hysteria in The Crucible and write an essay to demonstrate their perspective.

Opening Session
Let’s discuss the ending of the play, and I want to take a couple volunteers to re-read the ending scene between Elizabeth and John. What is revealed in this scene, why is it important, and how does it connect back to the theme of hysteria we discussed early on in the play?

Work Session
Today is all about hysteria! One of the themes in The Crucible is this idea that hysteria can make good people do terrible things. We’re going to have a class discussion over that idea, and then I would like for you all to write an impromptu essay.

In an essay of about two pages in length, determine if you think the people in Salem were affected by hysteria – what is hysteria, and how did it make people act out of the ordinary? – or if you think the people of Salem were acting rationally. Use evidence from the play to back up your statements, and make a strong, convincing argument.

Closing Session
AP Grading! Trade papers with a friend and grade the essay based on the AP Rubric. Then, explain to your buddy why you gave them the grade you did, and justify your grade with examples from their essay.

Assessment
Formative (AP style essay)

Differentiation
Product (varied essay length)

AP Lang: Essay Practice!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will learn how to write a timed AP-style essay and familiarize themselves with the 9-point AP Rubric.

Opening Session
Review from yesterday: What is hysteria? How did we see hysteria in yesterday’s reading?

Work Session
Today we’re going to be talking pretty specifically about the AP Lang exam that I hope you’re all planning to take in May. On the AP exam, 55% of your score (yes, more than half!) will come from 3 essays you must write in 2 hours and 15 minutes total. That gives you 40 minutes per essay, with about 15 minutes left over for reading the prompts and sources.

There are three types of essays. We’re going to talk about type number 2 today, the rhetorical analysis essay. For this essay, you will be given a short text and asked to analyze how the author uses their text to achieve their purpose.

I’ve got a copy of the 2017 rhetorical analysis prompt for everyone, and I’m going to write and talk my way through writing this essay with you guys. I’ll do it on the board and ask for audience participation, and when the essay is done, I’ll upload it to the class blog.

Closing Session
To end the day, I’m going to pass around a copy of the 9-point AP rubric to everyone. Your AP Essays are graded on a scale of 1-9, with 1 being pretty much abysmal and 9 being super awesome. Criteria are noted on the rubric. (You’ll note that on the back of the rubric is a lovely essay skeleton you can use to get an idea of how an essay might
look.)

Take a look at the essay I wrote on the board and give me a grade on the AP rubric! Write a short paragraph explaining why specifically you’ve assigned that grade to my essay – don’t give me a 9 just because I’m pretty, but look at the writing, judge it, and explain WHY!

Assessment
Formative (class composition of the essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, varied learning styles)

AP Lang: Shooting an Elephant SOAPSTone

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will examine Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” and perform a SOAPSTone analysis to consider the effects of mass hysteria.

Opening Session
VOCAB! Take ten minutes to define these words and then let’s unpack them together:

  1. Hysteria
  2. Allegory
  3. Puritanism
  4. Crucible **Get both definitions!
  5. Juxtapose
  6. Paranoia
  7. Persecute
  8. Creed
  9. Heathen
  10. Partisan

Work Session
After we do vocab, we’re going to be reading an essay by a guy named George Orwell. If you ever read Animal Farm or 1984, this is the same author! Today we’re reading “Shooting an Elephant.”

I’m giving you copies of the text, so I want you to read and annotate as you go. You may NOT use a highlighter – use a pen or pencil to underline, circle, make notes in the margins, etc. The reason I’m saying no highlighters is because you’re not allowed to have them on the AP test 🙂

We’re going to use a reading strategy called SOAPSTone to talk about this essay today.

  • Speaker
  • Occasion
  • Audience
  • Purpose
  • Subject
  • Tone

Make a chart with all those letters on your own paper, and we’ll go through each of them together so you have a solid understanding of the essay.

After reading, annotating, and SOAPSTone-ing, I want you to answer some critical reading questions, which I’ll put on the board for you to answer on your own paper.

Closing Session
Think-Pair-Share: Think for a minute about how the concept of hysteria applies to the essay we read today. Discuss what you think with a partner, and then we’ll take a few volunteers to share.

Assessment
Formative (reading questions, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, annotated text as needed)

American Lit: Hysteria!

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can relate the motif of hysteria in The Crucible to modern society.

Opening Session: Muse – Hysteria. Is this song a good representation of the concept of hysteria? What does it tell you about hysteria? Do you like it? Why or why not?

Work Session: Today we’re going to finish reading Act I of The Crucible in the book, then we’re going to flip to page 131 in Springboard and talk about hysteria. How do you see hysteria in the end of the act, when the girls are screaming out accusations?

How do you see hysteria in the real world?

Flip to the next page and choose one of the 3 scenarios under the Narrative Writing Prompt. Working on your own, write a short scene in which you show the scenario and how easily hysteria can happen.

Closing Session: Share your scenario!

Assessment: Informal – scenarios for completion

Differentiation: Process, product