Tag Archive for I have a crush on john green

American Lit: Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address

Standard: 

ELA.11-12.RI.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. 

ELA.11-12.RI.2. Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target:  I can cite evidence in order to answer questions 

Opening Session: What do you know about Abraham Lincoln?   (Historical/Literary Figures)

Work Session: 

Give historical background on the Civil War.

Show crash course on The Civil War https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rY9zHNOjGrs

Read Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address—

During reading: Be sure to discuss the shifts in purpose of each paragraph in the speech. 

After Reading:

Students will complete a multiple choice handout assessing things stated in the texts, central ideas in the text, and the words and phrases used in the texts.

Closing Session: After collecting the papers review the answers to their multiple choice handouts that assessed things stated in the texts, central ideas in the text, and the words and phrases used in the texts.

Assessment: Summative (Selected Response questions)

Differentiation: Scaffolded questions

American Lit: The Declaration of Independence

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its purpose and rhetorical features.

Opening Session: Crash Course – Fourth of July Special

Work Session: Today we’re going to read one of the most important things ever written – and that’s not me exaggerating or being America-centric; it really did change the course of human history! The Declaration of Independence!

Together we will read Chunk 1, the introduction, and talk about what’s going on. Then, I’m going to give you each a paragraph out of the book and ask you to rewrite it in plain, modern English. Then we’ll come back together to read and summarize the conclusion.

We can do the Second Read questions together after we finish reading the document 🙂

Closing Session: Vocab review! Let’s look at the new vocab words for this week again and do a crossword puzzle together!

Assessment: Formative – class discussion

Differentiation: Process (varied length paragraphs for modern translations)

World Lit: The White Man’s Burden

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: I can analyze Kipling’s “The White Man’s Burden” and Achebe’s Things Fall Apart for their treatments of the ideas of imperialism and colonialism.

Opening Session: Crash Course: Imperialism!

Work Session: Today we’re going to read a poem about the same thing as Things Fall Apart, only, from the other perspective. This is called “The White Man’s Burden,” by Rudyard Kipling (he’s the dude who wrote The Jungle Book). Consider how dismissive the speaker in the poem is as we read, and then I have some Second Read questions for you to answer. Remember when it asks for textual evidence, I’m looking for you to find quotes from the poem to prove what you are saying.

Second Read Questions

  1. What is “The White Man’s Burden” according to Kipling?
  2. Find textual evidence of how the poem portrays non-white people.
  3. Find tone words that show the narrator’s attitude towards colonialism.
  4. How does this attitude compare with that of the narrator in Things Fall Apart?
  5. How are Europeans’ views of Africans and the Africans’ views of whites represented in both “The White Man’s Burden” and Things Fall Apart?
  6. What is it today’s reader finds so repugnant about Kipling’s poem?
  7. If you were a citizen of a colonized territory, how would you respond to Kipling?

Closing Session: Ticket out the door!

3 things about Imperialism
2 connections between the poem and the novel
1 example of imperialism found in the poem

Assessment: Informal (questions check)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

World Lit: Things Fall Apart, Day 3

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can determine a central idea and analyze its development over the course of the novel Things Fall Apart.

Opening Session: Review-Preview: Crash Course Literature, Things Fall Apart I

Work Session: Today we’re continuing to read the book, and this time we will take some volunteers and read aloud chapters 5 and 6, pages 36-51. We will (as always) stop and discuss the story as we read.

After we finish, I want to give you a chance to catch up on anything you’ve missed this week!

Closing Session: Book check and VOCAB QUIZ!

Assessment: Informal (book check), formal (vocab quiz)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

American Lit: Speaking Out

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can research the historical context of a literary work to understand the social commentary it is presenting.

Opening Session: Crash Course: McCarthyism

Work Session: Welcome to Tuesday! Today we’re discussing what The Crucible is really about – witch hunts. No, not like that! It’s REALLY a social commentary on America in the 1950s. To get a handle on this, let’s read an article on page 149 of your Springboard book, entitled “Why I Wrote the Crucible” by Arthur Miller (spoiler alert, he wrote The Crucible). We will learn what he was intending to do with his work and get some historical context.

After we read this, I want to start working on your first embedded assessment for this unit. Grab a partner (everyone needs a partner!) who you want to work with for this assignment, and start brainstorming a social issue you want to tackle in your first embedded assessment, which is writing and performing a scene for the class.

We will discuss some social issue options first, and then you will work with your partner to choose one and start considering options for how you will present it in your scene. You will need to turn this in at the end of the day.

Closing Session: TOTD: What was Miller’s purpose in writing The Crucible?

Assessment: EA1 will be formally assessed

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Student Choice