Tag Archive for iambic pentameter

Can we start the end-of-the-year countdown yet?

Welcome back after your weekend, everyone! Only two more weeks, then finals, then summer break! We’re almost there!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will continue their reading of Oedipus the King, review their literary device vocabulary, and then work on a 6-word memoir.

Activator: Osborne 10th Lit 2011-2012 6-Word Memoirs, set to “We are Young”  by Fun.

So, today we’re going to dive right back into Oedipus after we finish our daily video. Today we have Jocasta, Messenger, Oedipus, Herdsman, and everyone else will read as the Chorus. We’re reading the first scene of part II today, which runs from page 503 in your book to page 512. Remember, everyone reads as the Chorus, so let’s all do it together!

After we finish this, we’re going to learn about iambic pentameter! YAY!!!! There’s this cool PowerPoint I’ve got, and you all don’t even need to take notes on it, because when we finish it you get to make your SONNET into iambic pentameter!! Here’s a tip: generally, if you put your sonnet to 10 syllables a line, it’ll just naturally be pretty close to iambic, and it’ll definitely be pentameter.

Finally, we’re going to do six word memoirs. This is probably my favorite assignment all year! Here’s the deal: You’re going to write a story using exactly six words. Legend has it, famous author Ernest Hemmingway was given a challenge: Tell a story in 6 words or less. His answer? “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Tells a whole story, doesn’t it? So now, I challenge you to do the same thing. The video we watched earlier contained six word memoirs from my classes last year. Today you’ll work on writing those memoirs, and on the Monday of finals week, our daily video will be created by me, out of all of your memoirs. Yay!

That’s all we have for today, everyone, so have an awesome day and I’ll see you tomorrow!

English or Italian Thursday!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning target: Students will continue to compose their own sonnets and read Oedipus the King.

Activator: B.O.B. – Airplanes

Welcome back! Did you guys enjoy the movie yesterday? Yes, yes, we will finish it up…

Anyway, today we’re reading the rest of part 1 of Oedipus, which we started yesterday, and we’ll read in the same format we did yesterday as well. How are you guys liking the story so far? I’ve seen a lot of disgusted/intrigued faces as we were reading this week 😀

After we finish the first part of the play, I want to teach you guys about Italian sonnets. This is a different style of sonnet than we talked about on Tuesday, but it’s still a sonnet and so it still has 14 lines. The sonnet I’m asking you guys to write – your baby momma drama sonnet – can be either English or Italian, whichever you prefer 🙂 When I get my sonnet composed, I’ll share it with you! You’ll have more time to work on this tomorrow, but try and get done what you can today so that tomorrow it’s not so hard to fiddle with it until it’s in iambic pentameter…what’s that? Ooooh, y’all are gonna have fun tomorrow!! :D:D

English or Italian Wednesday

Welcome back!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning target: Students will continue to compose their own sonnets and read Oedipus the King.

Activator: B.O.B. – Airplanes

So, my apologies in advance, but today will be a short post, as I’m nearing the end of National Novel Writing Month and I’m, unfortunately, nowhere near finished. That means you guys get a shorter blog post than normal today while I try to catch up to par.

ANYWAY, today we’re reading the rest of part 1 of Oedipus, which we started yesterday, and we’ll read in the same format we did yesterday as well. Afterwards, we’ll continue our sonnet composition. If we have oodles and oodles of extra time, we’ll go over a PowerPoint I have on iambic pentameter and poetic meter. WHEE!

Brandish the Wednesday Thrice…

Welcome to Wednesday! It’s all downhill from here, right? And you know what? After this week, only four more weeks until finals, and then SUMMER VACATION!!!

(wow, really? Four more weeks? Daaang…)

Standard: ›ELA10W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres.

Learning Target: Students will complete reading “Morte d’Arthur” and then learn about parodies and satires in preparation for tomorrow and Friday’s texts.

Activator: Heavy Hits! Jousting!

So, today we’re going to finish reading the poem we started yesterday, and then talk about parodies. Excited yet? I am 🙂

The reason we’re learning about parodies is because we’re going to be studying two of them! The first was written by Mark Twain, and it parodies the King Arthur legends by having a “modern” person go back in time and expose the absurdity of some of the things from medieval times. The story was written a while ago, so the characters aren’t really modern anymore, but it’s still fun to read! Friday we’ll be watching another very famous parody  – Monty Python and the Holy Grail.

So, without further ado, here’s a nifty PowerPoint on satire and parody! I likes me some PowerPoints lately, don’t I? Anyway, we need to get some background information on what a parody is, because after we read and watch a couple, we’re going to write a little parody of our own! I think you guys have done a good job with this so far (I’ve seen some awesome Facebooks for King Arthur) but we’ll do something a little more formal  🙂 See you guys Thursday!

The Death of Tuesday

Standard: ›ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.

Learning Target: Students will read the classic poem “Morte d’Arthur” and examine the differences between the Arthurian Legends we have read in class, as well as drawing on their own research from their Pick Three! Project thus far.

Activator: The Search for King Arthur

So, today we read the poem “Morte d’Arthur,” which was written in by 1835 Alfred, Lord Tennyson. If that name sounds familiar, it’s because we read a poem by him, “The Kraken,” way back in our poetry unit. His poem was based on a much older work by Sir Thomas Mallory which was written in the 1400s. So we’re going way back in the day for this reading!

I figured that before we read this, we should do a quick review of poetic meter, specifically iambic pentameter, since that’s what the poem is written in. And, because anything written in iambic pentameter is easier to understand when we read it aloud, that’s what we did! Popcorn reading, yay!!

Anywho, after reading the poem aloud and working our way through what it meant, we revisited the PowerPoints we started last week and continued our notes. After we got all that done, we spent some time reading The Hunger Games, which we need to catch up on 🙂

Tomorrow, we’ll read the other half of the poem, and then talk about parodies and satires, because we’re going to be reading something a little silly on Thursday, and then watching one of the most famous King Arthur Parodies on Friday and Monday. And I’ll say no more here, wouldn’t want to ruin the surprise!