Tag Archive for kinesthetic learning

Welcome to Caesar!

Standards

RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Activator

Learning Target

Scholars will learn historical context for Julius Caesar, and participate in a value line to determine how they feel about different moral issues.

Work Session

Welcome to Monday! We’re going to start out today with a little PowerPoint introduction to the story we’re about to read, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar:

Introduction to Julius Caesar

After that, we’re going to do a little value line activity. This is the one where we have “Agree” and “Disagree” on the walls, and you go stand where your opinion lies. Here are the statements we will be working with today:

  • It is never OK to kill another human being.
  • Sometimes, the good of many outweighs the good of one.
  • People always want more power for themselves.
  • The worst thing someone can do is to betray a friend.
  • You should listen to your gut instinct instead of the advice of others.
  • Arrogance will be the downfall of the greatest leaders.
  • The best leaders are loved by the general public.
  • A small group of powerful men should be able to decide the fate of a nation.
  • Sometimes you have to go to extremes to make your point.
  • Doing something wrong and admitting it is an honorable thing to do.

Closing Session

Write a paragraph – did you ever feel like you should change sides during our discussion and if so, why? If not, why not?

Assessment

Paragraphs will be graded

Differentiation

Kinesthetic learning styles with value line, visual/auditory with discussion

Welcome to Caesar!

Standard: SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Learning Target: Students will learn historical context for Julius Caesar, and participate in a value line to determine how they feel about different moral issues.

Activator: Video SparkNotes: Julius Caesar Summary

Welcome to Monday! We’re going to start out today with a little PowerPoint introduction to the story we’re about to read, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar:

Introduction to Julius Caesar

After that, we’re going to do a little value line activity. This is the one where we have “Agree” and “Disagree” on the walls, and you go stand where your opinion lies. Here are the statements we will be working with today:

  1. It is never OK to kill another human being.
  2. Sometimes, the good of many outweighs the good of one.
  3. People always want more power for themselves.
  4. The worst thing someone can do is to betray a friend.
  5. You should listen to your gut instinct instead of the advice of others.
  6. Arrogance will be the downfall of the greatest leaders.
  7. The best leaders are loved by the general public.
  8. A small group of powerful men should be able to decide the fate of a nation.
  9. Sometimes you have to go to extremes to make your point.
  10. Doing something wrong and admitting it is an honorable thing to do.

Hungry Hungry Friday

Welcome back, guys! Today we’re gonna do all Hunger Games stuff!!

Standard: ELA10RL2 The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of theme in literary works and provides evidence from the works to support understanding.

Learning Target: Students will examine the controversial nature of themes in The Hunger Games and will participate in a value line to demonstrate this.

Activator: One Thousand Dollars

So, video out of the way, we’re diving right into the Hunger Games. I want to give you guys some time to just read, so I think we’ll do some silent reading for about the first 20-30 minutes of class, depending on how it’s going (five bucks says fourth block can’t handle it and gets cut off early). Afterward, I want to start talking about some of the symbolism in the story. The author uses a lot of different symbols to represent things, so I figured it would be a good idea to start talking about them and what they might mean, especially because some of them can be kind of esoteric.

We’ll also take some time to talk about theme in Hunger Games. You guys should see some developing themes so far in the story…and lately I’m on a “let’s get up and move around” kick so let’s do a Value Line!

So, the cool thing about themes is that you can debate them and argue whether or not they’re really there or if the universal truth is, in fact, true. So with that in mind, I’ve got “Agree” and “Disagree” up on opposite walls of the classroom, and when I read out a theme or statement, you guys will have to move to which side you think is true. Once we’re all shaken out and valued around, I want you guys to defend yourselves with – you guessed it – evidence from the book!! YAY!!!!

And after our value line fun, we’ll do some more writing, brainstorming, or the like. I hope everyone has a great long weekend! We’ll quiz over “One Thousand Dollars” on Tuesday, so be ready!!