Tag Archive for letter

Day Twoesday!

Standard: W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Learning Target: Students will share their letters of introduction and begin working on their “sun and shadow” mandala.

Activator: Grammar School with Snooki

Welcome back to day 2, everyone! First things first, we’re going to share our letters. This is nothing formal, just go around the room and say your name and share something you wrote. Really, this is just to help me remember your names. When you’re done, turn your letter in. I’ll read it in full and write back to you 🙂

Today we are going to start working on our mandalas. I have made mandalas with my classes before, but this time we’re going to do something a bit different and work on what’s called a “Sun/Shadow” mandala. What the heck am I talking about, you ask? Great question!

SUN-SHADOW MANDALA PROJECT

Directions: Mandalas are one of the oldest art forms known to humanity. They are one of the oldest symbols in the world and one of the few universal ones. Translated from Sanskrit, mandala means circle – a symbol of completeness – the most perfect medium in which to present a picture of yourself. One type of mandala is called the sun-shadow mandala, and it represents, in part, the contrasts between one’s sun qualities – what is visible and projected – and the shadow qualities – what is interior and inward. I. The first step in making a mandala is writing two sets of answers to the questions below. One set represents the sun answers; the other set represents the shadow answers:

Sun-Images: How do you appear on the surface to the world? This is the part of you that is seen or projected to others.

1. What animal are you most like?

2. What plant are you most like?

3. What color are you most like?

4. What shape are you most like?

5. What number are you most like?

6. What mineral or gem are you most like?

7. What natural element are you most like?

Shadow-Images: The part of you that is not shown. The shadow images can be considered the direct opposites to the sun images.

1. What animal are you like internally?

2. What plant are you like internally?

3. What color are you like internally?

4. What shape are you like internally?

5. What number are you like internally?

6. What mineral or gem are you like internally?

7. What natural element are you like internally?

Remember:

Sun Image – what is visible and projected (what is seen)

Shadow Image – what is interior and inward (what is hidden; the opposite of the sun image)

 

Once the questions are complete, the next step is to write a sentence for each of your symbols. The most important part of your sentence is the “why” part. Through your sentences you will share why you feel a certain symbol represents you. In the end you will have a total of 14 sentences. Here are some examples:

Sun Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (sun image), because like the (sun image), I __________________________________.

Ex: I am like poison oak, because like poison oak, I’m harmless until stepped on.

Shadow Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (shadow image), because like the (shadow image), I ___________________________.

Ex: I am like a Venus flytrap, because like a Venus flytrap, I want to capture you and make you a part of me.

 

The next step is to write a single sentence containing all of your sun signs; and, a single sentence containing all of your shadow signs. This requires you to get creative. Consider it word play. You may add words necessary to complete your sentence. You will write both of these sentences around the outside perimeter of your mandala.

Sun Sentence: The playful kitten jumped up into the spider plant to stare up at the sky blue heavens with round, amethyst eyes before pouncing back to earth, scratching his claws in the dirt seven times.

Shadow Sentence: The fierce lion roared in agony as he stumbled into a diamond shaped thorn bush, his eyes black with rage and his breath as hot as fire, as his square jaw picked out thirteen painful needles.

 

Once you have your sun and shadow sentences written, I will give you a template to trace a circle and begin working on your mandala. You should incorporate all of your sun and shadow symbols into your mandala.

We will work on this all day in class, and we will have all day tomorrow for coloring your mandalas in. Enjoy, everyone!

Color your Thursday!

Standard: RL.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Learning Target: Students will continue working on their mandala project. Students who finish early will write a descriptive paragraph about their mandala, and potentially move on to writing a Li Bo inspired poem.

Activator: Daily video! I love sitcoms, and this scene from Friends makes me giggle every time I watch it: Joey and his thesaurus

Today in class we continued working on our mandalas . What’s that? You want some inspirational bullet points? Well OK then!

  • You might color using more than one medium, meaning you might use markers and crayons, or colored pencils and sharpie, or something like that.
  • Consider using only one color, but shading it in with different strengths (so your mandala might range from pink to red, for example…)
  • Use only a pencil and make the whole thing a pencil sketch!
  • Use only a sharpie and do the whole thing in black and white!
  • When you get up to share, show off the most important things on your mandala.
  • You don’t have to read the whole thing aloud; if you’re more comfortable doing so, you can just paraphrase the important bits.
  • If you’d rather, though, you can just read aloud :)

Try to have fun and get to know your classmates better! We’re stuck together until the end of the semester, after all!

… and most importantly, guys, be proud to show off who you are! Each and every one of you is rockin’ awesome…so show that off in your mandala and letter sharing. And hey….relish the art project and get-to-know-you week, because soon, the REAL fun starts!

Welcome to day 2!

Standard: W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Learning Target: Students will share their letters of introduction and begin working on their “sun and shadow” mandala.

Activator: Grammar School with Snooki

Welcome back to day 2, everyone! First things first, we’re going to share our letters. This is nothing formal, just go around the room and say your name and share something you wrote. Really, this is just to help me remember your names. When you’re done, turn your letter in. I’ll read it in full and write back to you :)

Today we are going to start working on our mandalas. I have made mandalas with my classes before, but this time we’re going to do something a bit different and work on what’s called a “Sun/Shadow” mandala. What the heck am I talking about, you ask? Great question!

SUN-SHADOW MANDALA PROJECT

Directions: Mandalas are one of the oldest art forms known to humanity. They are one of the oldest symbols in the world and one of the few universal ones. Translated from Sanskrit, mandala means circle – a symbol of completeness – the most perfect medium in which to present a picture of yourself. One type of mandala is called the sun-shadow mandala, and it represents, in part, the contrasts between one’s sun qualities – what is visible and projected – and the shadow qualities – what is interior and inward. I. The first step in making a mandala is writing two sets of answers to the questions below. One set represents the sun answers; the other set represents the shadow answers:

Sun-Images: How do you appear on the surface to the world? This is the part of you that is seen or projected to others.

1. What animal are you most like?

2. What plant are you most like?

3. What color are you most like?

4. What shape are you most like?

5. What number are you most like?

6. What mineral or gem are you most like?

7. What natural element are you most like?

Shadow-Images: The part of you that is not shown. The shadow images can be considered the direct opposites to the sun images.

1. What animal are you like internally?

2. What plant are you like internally?

3. What color are you like internally?

4. What shape are you like internally?

5. What number are you like internally?

6. What mineral or gem are you like internally?

7. What natural element are you like internally?

Remember:

Sun Image – what is visible and projected (what is seen)

Shadow Image – what is interior and inward (what is hidden; the opposite of the sun image)

 

Once the questions are complete, the next step is to write a sentence for each of your symbols. The most important part of your sentence is the “why” part. Through your sentences you will share why you feel a certain symbol represents you. In the end you will have a total of 14 sentences. Here are some examples:

Sun Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (sun image), because like the (sun image), I __________________________________.

Ex: I am like poison oak, because like poison oak, I’m harmless until stepped on.

Shadow Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (shadow image), because like the (shadow image), I ___________________________.

Ex: I am like a Venus flytrap, because like a Venus flytrap, I want to capture you and make you a part of me.

 

The next step is to write a single sentence containing all of your sun signs; and, a single sentence containing all of your shadow signs. This requires you to get creative. Consider it word play. You may add words necessary to complete your sentence. You will write both of these sentences around the outside perimeter of your mandala.

Sun Sentence: The playful kitten jumped up into the spider plant to stare up at the sky blue heavens with round, amethyst eyes before pouncing back to earth, scratching his claws in the dirt seven times.

Shadow Sentence: The fierce lion roared in agony as he stumbled into a diamond shaped thorn bush, his eyes black with rage and his breath as hot as fire, as his square jaw picked out thirteen painful needles.

 

Once you have your sun and shadow sentences written, I will give you a template to trace a circle and begin working on your mandala. You should incorporate all of your sun and shadow symbols into your mandala.

We will work on this all day in class, and we will have all day tomorrow for coloring your mandalas in. Enjoy, everyone!

HAPPY FIRST DAY!!!

Standard: SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively by posing and responding to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.

Learning Target: Students will be introduced to each other, the teacher, and the class.

Activator: Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo

Welcome back to school, everyone! I hope you’re all excited for the 2014-2015 school year, because I know I am!

We’re going to start off this school year with a little introductory game I like to call Two Truths and a Lie. The rules are pretty simple – you make up three statements, one of which is a lie. You share them with the class and then we have to guess which statement is the lie. Make sense? Great! Here’s mine:

  1. I got married last year.
  2. I had a baby last year.
  3. I bought a house last year.

Tough one, right? I’ll share the answer with you after you guys take a guess.

Anyway, after we finish with our little introductory game, I would like to give you all the opportunity to introduce yourselves to me a little more formally via a letter of introduction . One thing you guys should know about me is that I always try to write when you write, so as you are working on your letter, I will be writing my own to you.

I will finish me letter at home tonight and share it with you tomorrow! And also tomorrow, I would like for you all to share your letters with the class. I try to write back to you, too :) So if you didn’t finish your letter in class, make sure you do so for homework.

Happy first day, everyone!!

Oedipus Part II, Second Half!

Standards

RL.9-10.10 By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br/><br/>By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.
RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Activator

More figurative language…

Learning Target

Scholars will finish Oedipus and then compose a letter of speech about the play.

Work Session

Welcome back to class, everyone! I hope your week has started off well 🙂

Today we’re going to finish reading Oedipus the King, the same way we’ve been reading it so far. Afterwards, I’d like you guys to do a short writing assignment before we review our figurative language. Here’s the deal, and… guess what! You have a choice!!

Option A: Pretend you are Oedipus. Before you blind yourself, write a letter to the people of Thebes explaining what has happened. Do you feel guilty? Should you have listened to the prophet? What advice do you have for the people you used to rule? How are you going to punish yourself for what you’ve done and why? Give me 2-4 paragraphs, and don’t forget to put it in letter format!

Option B: We talked several times about the tragic flaw (hamartia) in Oedipus, which, in this case, was hubris. Hubris is an extreme pride and way of thinking that you’re better than everyone else or exempt from the same restraints as everyone else. How would the story of Oedipus differed if he had not had this tragic flaw? Write a summary in 2-4 paragraphs where you explain how Oedipus the King would have turned out if he had not had this tragic flaw.

Closing Session

A man is pushing his car along the road when he comes to a hotel. He shouts, “I’m bankrupt!” Why?

Assessment

Letters will be graded for RL.9-10.2: Analysis

Differentiation

Length can be varied, student choice in the letter/speech assignment.