Tag Archive for Lewis Carroll

Monster Monday!

Standard: RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

Learning Target: Students will be introduced to our new unit and read a short article on what makes a “monster.”

Activator: The Muppets reading “Jabberwocky”

I hope you guys are psyched about our new unit, because I sure am! This is one of my favorite units so far, and I’m really excited to be teaching it to y’all. It’s all about….MONSTERS! I know, I know, I’m awesome, please hold your applause.

Anyway, today I would like to start out by asking YOU all a question! On a little sheet of colored paper, I would like each of you to define the word “Monster” for me. What does it mean? What makes a monster? We will read these definitions together and see if we can come up with some notes about what you guys think it means to be a monster… I’ll post them here!

Afterwards, we’re going to read an article called “What Makes a Monster” by Donald Fergus, in which the author tries to answer that very question. To read this article, we’re going to use the SQUEEPERS method. We’ve done this before, so maybe it’ll be familiar to some of you. But, if not, here’s the drill:

  • S=survey
    • Preview the text
      • Look at the pictures/captions
      • Read highlighted/ bold words
      • Read headings/subheadinges
      • Think about what you are about to read
  • Q=question
    • Generate questions that we will be able to answer after we read (or look at questions on a test)
  • P=predict
    • Predict 1 to 3 things we will learn while reading
  • R=read
    • Read
      • Alone
      • With teacher
      • With partner
      • With a group
  • R=respond
    • Discuss which questions were answered
    • Review which questions weren’t answered
    • Eliminate questions that aren’t likely to be answered
    • Develop new questions
    • Continue surveying process
  • S=summarize
    • Summarize what we have learned

Sounds relatively easy, right?

Next up, we’re going to read a poem called “Jabberwocky,” the same one that we saw the Muppets perform earlier! This poem is about a monster called the Jabberwock. We will go through each stanza together, and as we do, I would like you to write on your paper (below your article summary) what is going on. When we’re finished, we’ll see if we have a consensus on what Lewis Carroll is saying. Finally, I would like you all to answer these three questions:

  1. What is the mood or tone of the poem? What are three adjectives Lewis Carroll uses to set the scene?
  2. Why is the Jabberwock dangerous? Why is it impressive that the boy killed the monster? List three words Lewis Carroll uses to tell you these things.
  3. (this is the hard one) Look up all six of the words you used above and write down their definitions as the dictionary gives them to you.

When this is turned in, we’re done for the day! YAY!

Happy Friday, Y’all!

Standard: ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.

Learning Target: Students will look at poems that use a controlling metaphor, and learn about the tanka poetic form.

Activator: We get TWO videos today! Both are courtesy of The Muppet Show! Jabberwocky and Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Those are two of my favorite poems, hands down. I also like “Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff” by A.E. Housman and “Astrophil and Stella no. 1″ by Sir Philip Sydney. But we’re not really going to closely study either of those :)

Anyway, today in class we read a poem called “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam, which can be found on page 722 of your textbook. This poem uses a single controlling metaphor to represent something. There are a couple of similar poems to this – I may have shared my Zombie Metaphor poem with you, depending on how sick of zombies the class has gotten. And, of course, we wrote a poetry journal on “Metaphor,” which means we’ve now done 50% of our major writing assignment for this unit! WHOO!!!

In case you’ve missed a day, here’s the breakdown of how a poetry journal should look:

  • MLA Heading (Student name, teacher name, class name, date. All of that on the upper left corner of your paper)
  • The title of the poem, centered and in quotation marks.
  • Three quotes from the poem. These should include a parenthetical citation, which is the author’s last name and the line number, in parentheses, after the quote. A period goes at the end. For example: “This is a quote” (Name line 2).
  • A paragraph that summarizes the poem. No abstract thought or interpretations here, just write a paragraph that tells what happened in the poem.
  • A paragraph that analyzes the poem. This is where you want to give your thoughts or interpretations. Also, this paragraph should include a literary device that was used in the poem. The PowerPoint with the complete list of devices we’re studying is in the post below this one.

That’s it! I think everyone in the class can make a 100% on this writing assignment!

Anyway, after we read “Metaphor” and wrote our poetry journal, we reviewed our figurative language from yesterday. We then moved on to looking at some Tanka poems. You can find four Tankas in your textbook, on pages 680 and 688. These Japanese poems are really short, and a relative of the Haiku. Traditionally, they focus on nature, but modern Tankas can be about anything.

Finally, we used our new-found knowledge of Tankas, Haikus, and metaphors to write our own poem. You have a choice here between composing in the strict form of Tanka, or writing a freestyle poem that uses a controlling metaphor, like “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam did. I look forward to reading all those poems!!

BONUS POEM! Metaphors by Sylvia Plath

Day Five, Do the Poetry Jive!

It’s Friday, Friday, Friday, gotta get down on Friday…

We get TWO videos today! Both are courtesy of The Muppet Show!

Jabberwocky

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Those are two of my favorite poems, hands down. I also like “Terence, This Is Stupid Stuff” by A.E. Housman and “Astrophil and Stella no. 1” by Sir Philip Sydney. But we’re not really going to closely study either of those 🙂

Anyway, today in class we read a poem called “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam, which can be found on page 722 of your textbook. This poem uses a single controlling metaphor to represent something. There are a couple of similar poems to this – I may have shared my Zombie Metaphor poem with you, depending on how sick of zombies the class has gotten. And, of course, we wrote a poetry journal on “Metaphor,” which means we’ve now done 60% of our major writing assignment for this unit! WHOO!!!

In case you’ve missed a day, here’s the breakdown of how a poetry journal should look:

  • MLA Heading (Student name, teacher name, class name, date. All of that on the upper left corner of your paper)
  • The title of the poem, centered and in quotation marks.
  • Three quotes from the poem. These should include a parenthetical citation, which is the author’s last name and the line number, in parentheses, after the quote. A period goes at the end. For example: “This is a quote” (Name line 2).
  • A paragraph that summarizes the poem. No abstract thought or interpretations here, just write a paragraph that tells what happened in the poem.
  • A paragraph that analyzes the poem. This is where you want to give your thoughts or interpretations. Also, this paragraph should include a literary device that was used in the poem. The PowerPoint with the complete list of devices we’re studying is in the post below this one.

That’s it! I think everyone in the class can make a 100% on this writing assignment!

Anyway, after we read “Metaphor” and wrote our poetry journal, we reviewed our figurative language from yesterday. We then moved on to looking at some Tanka poems. You can find four Tankas in your textbook, on pages 680 and 688. These Japanese poems are really short, and a relative of the Haiku. Traditionally, they focus on nature, but modern Tankas can be about anything.

Finally, we used our new-found knowledge of Tankas, Haikus, and metaphors to write our own poem. You have a choice here between composing in the strict form of Tanka, or writing a freestyle poem that uses a controlling metaphor, like “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam did. I look forward to reading all those poems!!

BONUS POEM! Metaphors by Sylvia Plath