Tag Archive for literary devices

AP Lang: Literary Devices in “I Hear America Singing” and “I, Too”

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will look for literary devices in two poems and analyze why the authors chose to use them.

Opening Session
I have a handout for everyone with a whole bunch of literary devices on them. Take about five minutes, choose 3 literary devices from the list, and come up with an example of each. Then we’ll go around the room and everyone will share one of the examples they came up with. If all yours get taken, come up with another before we get to you!

Work Session
Today we’re reading two poems, “I Hear America Singing” https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/i-hear-america-singing by Walt Whitman and “I, Too” https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/i-too by Langston Hughes.

First, I want to look at literary devices in these. Find as many as you can and we’ll share them as a class. More important than finding the devices, consider WHY you think Whitman and Hughes chose to use them.

After we read each poem, I want to discuss who each author was. If you’re reading from home, check out these articles:
Whitman: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/walt-whitman
Hughes: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/langston-hughes

I want to take a few minutes to discuss these two authors and their wildly different perspectives. Why does each author have his specific point of view?

Closing Session
To close the week, let’s relate these two poems and their authors back to the American Dream. We’ll have a short discussion about how each poem relates to this idea of whether or not the American Dream is alive and achievable, and then I’d like everyone to write a short paragraph summarizing your point of view.

Assessment
Formative (discussions, paragraphs)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style)

Oedipus Villanelles

Standards

RL.9-10.10 – Common Core State Standards

By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br/><br/>By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

L.9-10.5 – Common Core State Standards

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

RL.9-10.2 – Common Core State Standards

Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Activator

Oedipus Rex,
Resources:

 

 

 

Learning Target

Scholars will read the second half of part I of Oedipus Rex, then examine the villanelle poetic form.
 

Work Session

Welcome to FRIDAY! Today we’re kicking it off by reading the second half of part I of Oedipus. You guys liking the play so far?

As you recall from yesterday, we’re reading with individuals reading their parts, and the rest of us reading the chorus together…or, you might say, chorally. Remember to follow along in the book as we read, because it can get kind of confusing with an entire class reading together.

I just love the drama in this play, don’t you?

Anyway, after we finish reading this section, we’re going to look at some poetry – specifically, the villanelle. I love this format! And next week you guys are going to write your own 😀 Let’s read some about Oedipus, shall we? Let’s look at the figurative language used here, too!
Resources:

 

 

 

Closing Session

Riddle time! Lighter than what I am made of,
More of me is hidden than is seen,
I am the bane of the mariner,
A tooth within the sea.
What am I?
 

Assessment

Informal assessment of reading aloud.
 

Differentiation

Students will read chorally or individually depending on their reading level.

Oedipus Part I and Some Figurative Language!

Standards

RL.9-10.10 – Common Core State Standards

By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.<br/><br/>By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9—10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

RI.9-10.4 – Common Core State Standards

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language of a court opinion differs from that of a newspaper).

 

Activator

The full story of Oedipus…
Resources:

 

 

 

Learning Target

Scholars will read the first half of part I of Oedipus and review the literary devices we learned about earlier in the week.
 

Work Session

Today we’re going to start out by….READING THE PLAY! DundunDUN! Here’s how it’s gonna roll: I’ll assign parts to people who want to read a larger part. The rest of you will read together as the chorus. Yup! TOGETHER! Because that’s what the chorus DOES.

We will read the first half of part I today 🙂 Then we’ll do a little talking and maybe a bit of question answering before moving on to the ever popular FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE IN MUSIC! (*applause*)

This is kind of like a combination review and game, which I hope you guys enjoy. Tomorrow we will be working with some ACTUAL POETRY, some real live examples of this figurative language in poetic action.
Resources:

 

 

 

Closing Session

Riddle time! A woman has 7 children, half of them are boys. How can this be possible?
 

Assessment

Informal assessment of reading aloud.
 

Differentiation

Students will read chorally or individually depending on their reading level.

Storyboard Tuesday!

Standards

RL.9-10.5 – Common Core State Standards

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

L.9-10.5 – Common Core State Standards

Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.9-10.6 – Common Core State Standards

Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

 

Activator

Oedipus…
Resources:

 

 

 

Learning Target

Scholars will preview Oedipus Rex by making a storyboard of the events. They will place the events of the play in the order in which they happen and then do an illustrative storyboard.
 

Work Session

Welcome to Tuesday, y’all! Today we’re going to do a little bit of previewing of Oedipus. I’m going to give each table a set of slips of paper filled with the events of the play Oedipus Rex. They are all mixed up – your job as a group is to put the slips in order. When you finish, I would like for you to use a sheet of paper to illustrate a storyboard for the play. Stick figures are fine 🙂

After we finish that, I want to go over some vocab for this unit! We’re going to be studying figurative language along with the play we’re reading. So, I’ve got ANOTHER SCHWIFTY POWERPOINT to show you! Because apparently this is PowerPoint Appreciation Week. Yeesh.

Anyway, take some notes because you can bet your bottom dollar this stuff will be on your test!
Resources:

 

Closing Session

Riddle time!

I live above a star, but I do not burn.
I have 11 friends, but they do not turn.
I am visited in sequence: never, once, or repeatedly.
My initials are PQRS.

What am I?
 

Assessment

Informal assessment, grading of storyboards.
 

Differentiation

Students can work on storyboards visually, cloze or scaffolded notes if needed.

Can we start the end-of-the-year countdown yet?

Welcome back after your weekend, everyone! Only two more weeks, then finals, then summer break! We’re almost there!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will continue their reading of Oedipus the King, review their literary device vocabulary, and then work on a 6-word memoir.

Activator: Osborne 10th Lit 2011-2012 6-Word Memoirs, set to “We are Young”  by Fun.

So, today we’re going to dive right back into Oedipus after we finish our daily video. Today we have Jocasta, Messenger, Oedipus, Herdsman, and everyone else will read as the Chorus. We’re reading the first scene of part II today, which runs from page 503 in your book to page 512. Remember, everyone reads as the Chorus, so let’s all do it together!

After we finish this, we’re going to learn about iambic pentameter! YAY!!!! There’s this cool PowerPoint I’ve got, and you all don’t even need to take notes on it, because when we finish it you get to make your SONNET into iambic pentameter!! Here’s a tip: generally, if you put your sonnet to 10 syllables a line, it’ll just naturally be pretty close to iambic, and it’ll definitely be pentameter.

Finally, we’re going to do six word memoirs. This is probably my favorite assignment all year! Here’s the deal: You’re going to write a story using exactly six words. Legend has it, famous author Ernest Hemmingway was given a challenge: Tell a story in 6 words or less. His answer? “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Tells a whole story, doesn’t it? So now, I challenge you to do the same thing. The video we watched earlier contained six word memoirs from my classes last year. Today you’ll work on writing those memoirs, and on the Monday of finals week, our daily video will be created by me, out of all of your memoirs. Yay!

That’s all we have for today, everyone, so have an awesome day and I’ll see you tomorrow!