Tag Archive for margin marking

World Lit: The Life and Times of Frida

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: I can analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art.

Opening Session: Check out this video from PBS America, a clip from The Life and Times of Frida

Work Session: Okay, let’s dive into this excerpt from the biography of Frida Kahlo! As we read, you’re going to use metacognitive markers to mark the text:

  • put a ? when you have a question
  • put an ! when you have a strong reaction to something in the text
  • put a * when you have comment to make
  • underline any key ideas or details

After we go over this and talk about where we marked things, we are going to check out some artwork by Frida Kahlo. This painting is called Self-Portrait on the Borderline Between Mexico and the United States.

We’ll examine this painting using the OPTIC strategy! I’m just full of strategies today! OPTIC stands for

  • Overview: Write notes on what the visual appears to be about
  • Parts: Zoom in on the parts of the visual and describe any elements or details that seem important
  • Title: Highlight the title if you can
  • Interrelationships: Use the title as the theory and the parts of the visual as clues to detect and specify how the elements of the graphic are related
  • Conclusion: Draw a conclusion about the visual as a whole. What does the visual mean? Summarize the message of the visual in 1-2 sentences

After we discuss the painting, I want you to flip in your book back to page 35 and work on the Second Read questions. Remember that you should flip back to the text while answering these questions!

Closing Session: Let’s end the day with a book talk – I’ll share what I’m reading now, and I’d love to hear from one or two of you guys as well!

Assessment: Informal – class discussion, check of Second Read questions

Differentiation: Learning style (painting versus text); Process (scaffolded questions)

The F Word

Good morning, everyone, and welcome to a NEW UNIT!!!!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I will analyze how two articles develop the concept of feminism, and then I will objectively summarize what those two texts said.

Activator: On the Ground: Women’s March in Washington D.C. from last Saturday.

Work Session: Welcome to Thursday! Today we’re starting a new unit about a topic that might be a little controversial – feminism! What?! Feminism? Have I gone completely bananas!

Well, no. And because sometimes feminism seems like a dirty word, today we’re going to talk about what feminism is and what it means. These concepts will guide our understanding throughout this unit, so I think it’s an important first day activity.

First, let’s read this article from Huffington Post, entitled “What Is Feminism?” together. As we read, do your margin markings (instructions are on your sheet). When we’re done and everyone has had a chance to mark, we’ll talk about it as a class.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/womens-rights-news/what-is-feminism_b_6985612.html

Next up, I have another article for you to read – this one is actually a blog post by a famous author, Patrick Rothfuss. He gives a pretty solid definition of feminism in pretty down-to-earth terms, so I think this will help with understanding. This time around, I’m going to give you some time to read to yourself and annotate the article. When you annotate, you can do all your margin marking like normal, but you can also underline important things, circle words and write definitions down, write notes or reactions in the margins, or whatever. Think of it as active reading, reading with a pen in your hand.

Fanmail FAQ: The F Word.

After we finish reading and discuss, I’ll pull a couple volunteers up to the document camera to show off their annotations. I’ll also show off my annotated version that I did on the doc cam while you guys were working.

Closing Session: Finally, for the last fifteen minutes or so of class, I want to give you all some time to process what we’ve talked about today. Write me a Seven Sentence Summary about the articles we read in class today. Try to be objective, that is, write just what the articles said and how they developed the ideas of feminism, not what you personally feel about the topic (because trust me, we will have LOTS of time for personal opinions this unit!!)

Differentiation: Process (abbreviated text, single text instead of two)

Assessment: Closing paragraphs and/or annotations may be graded.

 

…but some animals are more equal than others.

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I will read an article examining false confessions and analyze the central idea of that text, and then continue reading Animal Farm.

Opening Session: 60 second recap!

Work Session: Welcome back! Today we’re going to continue Animal Farm, but first, we’re going to revisit what we discussed yesterday – why do innocent people confess to crimes they didn’t commit, knowing the punishment is death? We’re gonna read an article from the New York Times about this – Why Do Innocent People Confess? and we’re going to do a bit of margin marking on this. Here’s what you do:

  • Put a * next to anything you think would be worth discussing with the class. (3)
  • Put a ? next to anything that confuses you or that you have questions about. (2)
  • Put a ! next to any statement with which you strongly agree. (1)
  • Put a X next to any statement with which you strongly disagree.(1)

We are also going to be annotating the text. This means we’re going to be marking all over it while we read, which I’ll do on the document camera while you guys do it on your papers!

If you’re following along from home, here’s a printable version of the article: Why do innocent people confess?

After we finish that, we’re going to continue with Animal Farm with a partner reading strategy. I’m giving everyone a sticky note and you’ll be putting it next to interesting things in the book. Then we’ll do a timed-by-page strategy for chapter 9. Our goal is to get through chapter 9 today, but we’ll see how far we get after discussing our article.

Closing Session: And at the end of the day we have a little ticket out the door of course 🙂 Let’s make this one a 3-2-1. 3 things you’ve learned, 2 things you’re questioning, and 1 thing you found surprising.

Assessment: Formative – margin marking article; ticket out the door

Differentiation: Process – high level readers can read independently, highlighters given as needed.

Guernica!

Standard: 

  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: I will examine Guernica by Pablo Picasso and begin reading our anchor text, Animal Farm.

Opening Session:  Pablo Picasso, an artist we are going to be looking at today, at work:

Work Session: First on the agenda for today, we’re going to view a really famous painting by Pablo Picasso. I’m not going to tell you anything about it. I just want you to look at it for thirty seconds and think…and then we’re going to write. I’m going to play a song while we write which has the same title as this painting, Guernica. I’ll give you until the song finishes to write your reaction to this picture.

  • What do you think this is a painting of?
  • Why do you think Picasso painted it?
  • What does this represent?
  • What does it mean to you?
  • What do you think this painting says about the time period when it was painted?
  • What do you think would be a good title for this painting?

There! Okay, here is the painting…

Now that you guys have written about the picture, we’re going to read an article about the bombing of Guernica. While we read this, we’re going to mark it up with a reading strategy called margin marking. Here’s the skinny:

  • Put a * next to anything you think would be worth discussing with the class. (3)
  • Put a ? next to anything that confuses you or that you have questions about. (2)
  • Put a ! next to any statement with which you strongly agree. (1)
  • Put a X next to any statement with which you strongly disagree.(1)

After we do our margin marking, we’re going to discuss what needs discussing and see where we all fall.

Once we finish talking about the painting, we’re going to start reading Animal Farm! Our goal today is to get through chapters 1-3. We’ll be listening to the audio version in class to start off easy 🙂

If you’re reading from home or ISS, here is the full story:

After we finish those chapters, if there’s time, I want you guys to write a short paragraph anticipating what will happen next. At this point in the story, the animals have rebelled and are starting to put their principles of Animalism to full effect.

Closing Session: Ticket out the door — answer these questions:

1. Why do the pigs get the milk and apples?

2. What happened to the puppies that were born right after the revolution started?

3. Do you think the farmhouse will be forever preserved as a museum, and if not, what will become of it?

Assessment: Formative assessment of Guernica brain-dump writing, ticket out the door collection.

Differentiation: Learning style – visual/auditory interpretations of Guernica; Process: annotated version of the article provided as needed; Process: listening to the audiobook, high level readers can read independently.

…but some animals are more equal than others.

Standard:

  • RI.9-10.2. Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will read an article examining false confessions, and then continue reading Animal Farm.

Daily Video: 60 second recap!

 

Welcome back! Today we’re going to continue Animal Farm, but first, we’re going to revisit what we discussed yesterday – why do innocent people confess to crimes they didn’t commit, knowing the punishment is death? We’re gonna read an article from the New York Times about this – Why Do Innocent People Confess? and we’re going to do a bit of margin marking on this. Remember margin marking??

  • Put a * next to anything you think would be worth discussing with the class. (3)
  • Put a ? next to anything that confuses you or that you have questions about. (2)
  • Put a ! next to any statement with which you strongly agree. (1)
  • Put a X next to any statement with which you strongly disagree.(1)

We are also going to be annotating the text. This means we’re going to be marking all over it while we read, which I’ll do on the document camera while you guys do it on your papers!

If you’re following along from home, here’s a printable version of the article: Why do innocent people confess?

After we finish that, we’re going to continue with Animal Farm with a partner reading strategy. I’m giving everyone a sticky note and you’ll be putting it next to interesting things in the book. Then we’ll do a timed-by-page strategy for chapter 9. Our goal is to get through chapter 9 today, but we’ll see how far we get after discussing our article. And at the end of the day we have a little ticket out the door of course 🙂

Assessment: Formative – margin marking article; ticket out the door

Differentiation: Process – high level readers can read independently, highlighters given as needed.