Tag Archive for monsters are out there

The Story of Wednesday!

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: Students will finish reading The Metamorphosis and continue working on their picture books.

Activator: THUG NOTES!!!

Work Session:

Welcome to Tuesday! We are going to continue reading The Metamorphosis today, using the same strategy we did yesterday – and we are gonna finish the book today!! What what, we are DONE reading it!!! Now we just get to work on our picture books and discussion before we do our essay and test next week! (Yep, essay. I must be a glutton for punishment because those suckers take 5ever to grade, and yet I keep assigning them….)

Anyway, we will read to the end of the page and then I’ll ask you guys a question, then reset the timer and check for understanding. This way things are chunked up a little but. BUT, because I have to raise the bar, we are doing 6 minutes per page this time instead of 8 like we had yesterday!

After we finish, I want you guys to get into your groups and work on your picture books. Remember, you need to have your story draft and storyboard (rough draft of illustrations) done TODAY!!! Tomorrow we will have a whole day work session for your picture books, so be ready!

Closing session: Picture book check in!

Differentiation: Learning Style – visual learners can draw, writers can write, kinesthetic learners can work on book assembly.

Assessment: Formative checks for understanding, picture books will be graded.

Picture It: Monday

Standards

W.9-10.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
W.9-10.3.b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
W.9-10.3.c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
W.9-10.6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.
W.9-10.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Activator

Learning Target

Students will begin part III of The Metamorphosis make a draft and storyboard for their picture book project, detailing the writing and illustrations to go on each page.

Work Session

Okay, nobody panic, but I’m about to put you into assigned groups. Don’t freak out! I do know who your friends are, generally! So get with your groups… Today we’re going to read the first half of part III in the book. YAY!! This means we’re ALMOST DONE!

Read with your group pages 1095-1101 (all the way to the bottom of the page). Then, answer the following questions:

  1. Who becomes Gregor’s caretaker?
  2. What are three things the family does to earn money?
  3. What draws Gregor out of his room?

After everyone has turned in these three questions (consider it a ticket to move onto the next activity),I’ll give you guys a big group assignment, which is….

A picture book!!!

Here’s the skinny:

The Picture Book Project!
For this project, you will plan, write, illustrate, and produce your own original children’s picture book.

You will be working in pre-assigned groups of 3. Your picture book should meet the following requirements:

  • The story must be a retelling of Franz Kafka’s story The Metamorphosis, written for children.
    • You must use the same characters as The Metamorphosis.
    • The story must follow the plot of The Metamorphosis.
  •  Your story should be 300-500 words.
  • Your book should be at least 10 pages, but no more than 20 pages.
  • The text of your book should reflect proper grammar, conventions, and spelling. The text may be typed or hand-written.
  • The illustrations should be fully colored and show effort, creativity, and neatness. I understand that not everyone is Rembrandt, but everyone is capable of putting time and energy into his or her artwork.
  • You must complete and turn in the following components:
    • Story Draft (20 points) – Due tomorrow, Tuesday, September 13th
    • Storyboard (20 points) – Due tomorrow, Tuesday, September 13th
    • Finished Product (60 points) – Due Friday, September 16th
  • The Picture Book Project – metamorphosis.docx

Closing Session

Check in – Picture Book Project

Assessment

Reading ticket, informal assessment of picture book work/brainstorming/drafting.

Differentiation

Students will be placed in groups of varied ability level, talent, and learning style. Students will read in small group to account for differences in reading levels.

Aww, widdle baby Gwegor…

Standards

RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.9-10.5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).
RI.9-10.3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

Activator

‘Cause this is…

Learning Target

Scholars will continue their reading of The Metamorphosis, analyzing the text for details about the characters and historical context, and then make a “baby book” about Gregor.

Work Session

So, today we’re continuing with reading The Metamorphosis. We’re going to do this a little differently today – remember that I do, we do, you do thing? Today we’re going to go to the same reading style we were doing during most of Animal Farm. I’ll read a paragraph, and while I read I’ll move around the room and select a student to read the next paragraph. Some of the paragraphs in this story are super long, so I may interrupt you midway so no one gets stuck reading a huge amount. I like this reading strategy because no one gets caught unawares, since I warn you ahead of time if you’re reading next, but everyone has to follow along since you don’t know exactly what you’ll be reading until I pick on you 🙂 We are reading the first half of part II today.

Now, I do want you guys to follow along in your textbook while we do this, but I would also like you to be jotting down some notes while we follow the story. Specifically, I want you to take notes on Gregor, who he is, what is he like, what are his likes and dislikes, and so on. After we finish reading and taking some notes, we’ll move on to another activity!

If you’re reading from home or ISS, here is the link to the story online: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/5200/5200-h/5200-h.htm

The Metamorphosis is a character-driven story, meaning that what keeps you reading is your attachment to the characters, your vested interest in seeing the characters develop, that sort of thing. The opposite of this would be a plot-driven story, where you’re reading more to see what’s going to happen next, and the characters might be more one-dimensional. Because Kafka chose to focus so much on the characters in his story, we’re going to make…dundunDUN! A “Baby Book” for Gregor!

Have you guys heard of this before? It’s a little book that talks about a person’s likes, dislikes, what they look like and how they act, and maybe has a little picture of them. I’m going to teach you how to fold a sheet of paper into a little 8-page mini book, and now it’s your turn to fill them out for Gregor! The “Ghost Writer” is where you put your name, and you should write the book as though you are Gregor. In most cases, the pages can be filled with no more than a sentence or maybe two at the most. Don’t forget to draw a picture of yourself! I have an example I’ll pass around for everyone, too.

Here’s a download of the baby book sheet: Gregor’s Baby Book!

Closing Session

Trade your baby book with a friend to read and write a 1-sentence “blurb” for the cover.

Assessment

Baby books will be graded.

Differentiation

Baby books use different learning styles to complete, students’ oral reading sections will vary in length according to reader skill and text complexity.

Smell Like a Monster!

Standards

RL.9-10.7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).
RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
RL.9-10.9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Activator

A classic :)

Learning Target

Scholars will look at the concept of monsters in children’s literature and television, and they will also read the second half of part I of The Metamorphosis.

Work Session

Today we’re going to start out by listening to the second half of part I of The Metamorphosis and then talk about monsters in some other media. When we last left Gregor, he had just gotten out of bed and was about to work his way out of his room and try to get to work. Let’s see what happens today…

…Well, that was weird, wasn’t it? Anyway, we’ll of course continue with Gregor later on, but for now how about swapping gears and talking about some other monsters? The video we watched today is a famous children’s story that you’ve all probably read – or if not, you’ve seen it now! But just to reiterate, let’s get six volunteers up here to perform the story! Whoo! Give ‘em a round of applause!

After our lovely acting performs the Wild Things, we’re going to look at a couple of other famous children’s monsters – Grover and Cookie Monster!

So, obviously we have a lot of monsters made for kids today. Wild Things and Muppets are both obviously set up for little children to watch, and obviously not intended to scare. So…what’s up with this? I would like you to think about and discuss this in a paragraph. Yep, a paragraph. Write and turn in one paragraph of 7-10 sentences that answers the following question:

–>Why do you think children’s shows and books choose to use “monstrous” characters such as the monsters on Sesame Street and the Wild Things in Where the Wild Things Are?

Closing Session

Turn in your paragraph and tell me who your favorite monster is :)

Assessment

Students will be graded for their paragraphs as well as for their participation in class discussions and in performing Where the Wild Things Are.

Differentiation

Different learning styles are used in the presentation of different types of monsters. Various reading levels from children’s picture books through college+ level reading of Kafka allow for challenging and accessible texts for all students.

Metamorphowednesday!

Standards

  • RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • RL.9-10.10 By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Activator

Franz Kawhat?

Learning Target

Scholars will read an encyclopedia entry on monsters and begin their anchor text for this unit, Kafka’s “Metamorphosis”. They will look at the ideas of alienation and monstrosities as presented in Kafka’s work and continue to wrestle with the question of what makes a monster.

Work Session

Today we’re going to start reading our Big Reading for this unit, but FIRST we’re continuing with our nonfiction reading. Whoohoo! We’re starting off with an article that’s appropriately titled “What makes a monster scary?” You’re gonna SQUEEPERS again!!! When you get to the R for reading, I want you to read the article I give you in any way you choose (you may read silently then discuss with a partner, alternate paragraphs reading aloud, have one person read aloud to the other, whatever you like). After you’ve finished reading the article, consider the definitions you wrote yesterday and work with a partner or alone to revise your definitions into a new one.

Your end product should be a 2-3 sentence concise definition that accurately explains what it means to be a monster. Yes, I’m grading it this time.

After we finish with this article, we’re going to start reading our Big Reading for this unit. This is a story entitled “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka. We watched a summary video of it at the beginning of class, but for simplicity’s sake let me give you a two-word run down of this story. It is 1.) Long and 2.) Complicated.

Excited yet? We’re going to listen to me read aloud for the first half of Part I of the story. That’s page 1066-1072 in our book, stopping at the end of the first paragraph on 1072. I would like for you to follow along in your book while you’re listening to me. If you’re reading online, you’re reading to the sentence “his sister began to cry.” We’re doing a bit of “I do, we do, you do” with this story. I’ll read part I aloud, we’ll read part II together, and part III you will read on your own 🙂

This is a VERY hard text, guys. So we’re going to run through it very slowly and carefully and do a lot of checks for understanding. I hope you enjoy the story! :)

Closing Session

Ticket out the door: 3 things you liked about the story, 2 things you didn’t like, and 1 question you still have.

Assessment

TOTD to check for understanding, definition of the word monster.

Differentiation

Students may read with their partners in any way that works best for them, differentiated/simplified texts, use of audio recording.