Tag Archive for music

World Lit: Iliad OPTIC

If you need to catch up on reading The Iliad at home, here is the text we’re reading in class:

iliadbook1+6

If you missed a day or need a copy of the background notes we took, here they are:

The Iliad Story Notes

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze a piece of artwork using the OPTIC strategy and compare the heroes Achilles and Hector.

Opening Session
Let’s take a few minutes to finish up yesterday’s reading comprehension questions and review what happened in the story. Today, we’re going to be doing an OPTIC lesson, so we will pause in our reading in case you need to catch up at home 🙂

Work Session
Look at the piece of artwork I have on the screen – it’s called “Achilles Slays Hector” by Peter Paul Rubens. While you look at this, I am going to play a song called “Cry of Achilles” by Alter Bridge. As you look and listen, write down whatever comes into your head – thoughts, feelings, things you notice about the picture, anything!!


Take a look at this OPTIC handout I’m handing around – you might also notice this is on a poster in the room 🙂

We’re going to use the OPTIC strategy on the wall and go through it as a class. We’ll discuss what we see and why we think the author made those specific choices.

Closing Session
To end the day, I want you guys to write me a paragraph for an exit ticket: Who do you think is more admirable, Achilles or Hector? With whatever time we have left, we can watch the beginning of Troy, which we will continue tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative (OPTIC write ups, paragraphs, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style)

World Lit: OPTIC Lesson for Iliad; Troy

If you need to catch up on reading The Iliad at home, here is the text we’re reading in class:

iliadbook1+6

If you missed a day or need a copy of the background notes we took, here they are:

The Iliad Story Notes

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze a piece of artwork using the OPTIC strategy and compare the heroes Achilles and Hector.

Opening Session
Look at the piece of artwork I have on the screen – it’s called “Achilles Slays Hector” by Peter Paul Rubens. While you look at this, I am going to play a song called “Cry of Achilles” by Alter Bridge. As you look and listen, write down whatever comes into your head – thoughts, feelings, things you notice about the picture, anything!!


Work Session
Take a look at this OPTIC handout I’m handing around – you might also notice this is on a poster in the room 🙂

We’re going to use the OPTIC strategy on the wall and go through it as a class. We’ll discuss what we see and why we think the author made those specific choices.

Closing Session
To end the day, I want you guys to write me a paragraph for an exit ticket: Who do you think is more admirable, Achilles or Hector? With whatever time we have left, we can watch the beginning of Troy, which we will continue tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative (OPTIC write ups, paragraphs, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style)

American Lit: Willing To Forgive

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can cite evidence to answer text-dependent questions.

Opening Session: What’s your opinion on a wife who is willing to forgive her cheating husband?

Work Session: Today we’re going to continue reading The Crucible, starting in Act II and reading as far as we can get today! From your opening session, you’ve probably guessed that a lot of today’s act focuses on Elizabeth’s relationship with John Proctor. We will read as much as we can, and stop fifteen minutes before the bell for our closing session.

Closing Session: Look at the following lyric from the Aretha Franklin song we listened to at the beginning of class:

Well, I’m willing to forgive you but I can’t forget, cause you really really really really hurt me this time.  Well, I guess I can go on— 

 Discuss how the above line from Aretha Franklin’s Willing to Forgive applies to Elizabeth in the section of the text we read today.

Assessment: Informal – paragraph checks

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

 

Musical Hell!

Are you ready for a little musical interlude?

Standard: 

  • 9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Learning Target: I will analyze the representations of the sins punished in Dante’s Inferno as they are presented in modern music.

Activator: Think of a song that represents Hell to you….. What circle? Let’s see the ones I came up with

Work Session: Your test is TOMORROW!!!! So today we are going to do a little review game, where I play a song and you match the song to the circle of Hell. A couple things to remember:

  • I do not care about you knowing exactly what circle is what sin.
  • I care that you know what the sins ARE – not you can list them, but you know what the words MEAN.
  • I care that you understand the law of symbolic retribution (the punishment fits the crime).
  • I do not care if you memorize what Dante’s punishments are for each individual sin.
  • I do not care if you memorize the orders of the circles.
  • I DO care if you know the difference in greed and gluttony, in wrath and violence, in lust and betrayal.

In other words, I don’t want you to MEMORIZE the text, but I DO want you to understand it. Capisce?

Excellent 🙂 Let’s listen to some music!

After we finish listening to these 9 songs, I want you to flip your sheet over. On the back is a place for you to come up with your own 9 songs for the inferno. Warning: Fraud is kind of hard to find!

Enjoy! I may use these songs later on, so put some effort into this!!!

Closing Session: Think-Pair-Share with a neighbor and then with the class!

Differentiation: Learning style (visual, auditory); interest (musical genres).

Assessment: Worksheets will be checked for completion and understanding (answers could vary).

Guernica!

Standard: 

  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: I will examine Guernica by Pablo Picasso and begin reading our anchor text, Animal Farm.

Opening Session:  Pablo Picasso, an artist we are going to be looking at today, at work:

Work Session: First on the agenda for today, we’re going to view a really famous painting by Pablo Picasso. I’m not going to tell you anything about it. I just want you to look at it for thirty seconds and think…and then we’re going to write. I’m going to play a song while we write which has the same title as this painting, Guernica. I’ll give you until the song finishes to write your reaction to this picture.

  • What do you think this is a painting of?
  • Why do you think Picasso painted it?
  • What does this represent?
  • What does it mean to you?
  • What do you think this painting says about the time period when it was painted?
  • What do you think would be a good title for this painting?

There! Okay, here is the painting…

Now that you guys have written about the picture, we’re going to read an article about the bombing of Guernica. While we read this, we’re going to mark it up with a reading strategy called margin marking. Here’s the skinny:

  • Put a * next to anything you think would be worth discussing with the class. (3)
  • Put a ? next to anything that confuses you or that you have questions about. (2)
  • Put a ! next to any statement with which you strongly agree. (1)
  • Put a X next to any statement with which you strongly disagree.(1)

After we do our margin marking, we’re going to discuss what needs discussing and see where we all fall.

Once we finish talking about the painting, we’re going to start reading Animal Farm! Our goal today is to get through chapters 1-3. We’ll be listening to the audio version in class to start off easy 🙂

If you’re reading from home or ISS, here is the full story:

After we finish those chapters, if there’s time, I want you guys to write a short paragraph anticipating what will happen next. At this point in the story, the animals have rebelled and are starting to put their principles of Animalism to full effect.

Closing Session: Ticket out the door — answer these questions:

1. Why do the pigs get the milk and apples?

2. What happened to the puppies that were born right after the revolution started?

3. Do you think the farmhouse will be forever preserved as a museum, and if not, what will become of it?

Assessment: Formative assessment of Guernica brain-dump writing, ticket out the door collection.

Differentiation: Learning style – visual/auditory interpretations of Guernica; Process: annotated version of the article provided as needed; Process: listening to the audiobook, high level readers can read independently.