Tag Archive for music video

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 5

Goals for the Week:

  1. Draft a personal working definition of feminism. Due today! 
    • Turn in your definitions via Google Drive or OneDrive!
  2. Read and analyze act I of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  3. Read and analyze act II of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read the second half of act II of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from when Dr. Rank enters to the end of the act)
  2. Consider Nora’s relationship with Dr. Rank
    • What does Dr. Rank confess to Nora? Why does he tell her this? What is her reaction? Why does she react that way?
  3. Understand what’s going on with the blackmail situation.
    • Krogstad drops a letter in the mailbox. What does it say? What’s with Nora’s freak-out dancing? Why does Nora end the act saying “ Five o’clock. Seven hours until midnight; and then four-and-twenty hours until the next midnight. Then the Tarantella will be over. Twenty-four and seven? Thirty-one hours to live.”?

Today’s Lesson!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can consider Nora’s relationship with Dr. Rank and Torvald by reading A Doll’s House and watching a movie clip, so that I can analyze how their relationships develop and advance the plot of the play.

Activator: Check out this movie clip! It has something in common with what we’re reading in A Doll’s House today…

Another really great scene is “Cards for Juliet” from Love, Actually. The movie is rated R, so I won’t put it here on the blog, but you should talk about it with your mom or dad and look up that scene if they say it’s OK 🙂

After watching these, make a quick prediction! Clearly, someone is going to be confessing their love for someone else, and that someone is already in a relationship. Whom do you think will be confessing to whom?

Work Session: 

Today we finish reading Act II of A Doll’s House. During the end of act II, everything pretty much falls apart in Nora’s life – things are just getting worse and worse for the poor little songbird!

While you’re reading, don’t forget to consider and reflect upon our checklist questions for the day:

  1. Consider Nora’s relationship with Dr. Rank
    • What does Dr. Rank confess to Nora? Why does he tell her this? What is her reaction? Why does she react that way?
  2. Understand what’s going on with the blackmail situation.
    • Krogstad drops a letter in the mailbox. What does it say? What’s with Nora’s freak-out dancing? Why does Nora end the act saying “ Five o’clock. Seven hours until midnight; and then four-and-twenty hours until the next midnight. Then the Tarantella will be over. Twenty-four and seven? Thirty-one hours to live.”?

As we finish Act II, we’re at the point in the play where everything has fallen apart. And of course we’re going to leave you on a cliffhanger for longer than usual! You’ve got your regular weekend off, and then on Monday we’re going to pause our reading and hold a round-table discussion about the play. Please tune in to the video on Monday!

Closing Session: 

Keeping with our love-confessions-to-people-in-relationships theme, I’d like for you to consider the following song:

Warning: I like this song. So you can bet it’s probably awful. I have terrible taste in music.

So, when I was looking for video clips and songs for this lesson, I found SO MANY out there that have this same kind of idea – someone confesses they’re madly in love with someone else, and that someone is already in a relationship or married. Consider some things about this:

  • Is this selfish? When Dr. Rank confesses to Nora, he’s doing it because he doesn’t want to die without telling her. But this makes Nora’s life much more complicated. Was it cruel of Rank to put that burden on Nora?
  • How should Nora have reacted to this? What did she actually do? What would you have done in her place?

While you’re considering those things, go out to the internet yourself and find me another song or movie clip with the same theme! Comment the YouTube link here on the blog, or send it to me over Remind/email/in your Google doc! This isn’t exactly an “assignment,” but I think it would be cool to collect a bunch of clips from everyone 🙂

Looking Ahead: Next Week’s Goals and Tomorrow’s Checklist

Whew, week 1 is done!! Here are next week’s goals:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing Monday!

  1. Watch the round table discussion on A Doll’s House.
    • Comment on YouTube with your input!
  2. Learn about the “I need feminism because…” project
  3. Make your own “I need feminism because” photo

American Lit: The American Dream

Standards:

ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target(s): ✓ I can cite evidence from a text in order to answer questions about complex ideas

Opening Session: For this unit we will be exploring the overarching question: What is the American Dream? Have the students watch a video/listen to a song with lyrics in front of them (Such as Madonna’s American Life, America by Simon and Garfunkel, West Side Story (America), Pink Houses by John Cougar Mellancap etc.) and write on postit notes afterwards what they think the American dream entails. Facilitate a classroom discussion.

Work Session
Ask for a definition for Patriotism * Differentiation ELL & SWD use frayer model *Regular & Advanced Define the term as Exemplification, Function, Classification, Negation

Review how to do a brief constructed response:

Choose a clip from a movie (The Patriot, Saving Private Ryan & Forrest Gump etc.)

Constructed Response: How does the character in the movie fit the definition of a patriot? Model on board

Model: Forrest Gump is an example of a patriot because he risks his life for his country by fighting in a war and risking his life to save other Americans. In the movie, Forrest’s platoon is attacked by enemy fire in the jungles of Vietnam. Also in the movie, Forrest is able to get away from enemy fire but decides to turn around in order to bring other injured American soldiers out of harm’s way. By risking his own life in a war fought by his country and saving others, it shows he is a patriot—he loves his country. People
say they love their country all the time but very few are willing to act as Forrest did in this movie, making patriotism rare among most people.

Closing Reminder: Revisit the learning target. Constructed Response: Read Veterans Day How does McCain exemplify a patriot as we have defined it?

Assessment Strategies: Formal: product assessment/writing

Differentiation: See above graphic organizer.

AP Lang: Money and the American Dream

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can analyze multiple texts to identify the development of a recurring idea or theme.

Opening Session: Kanye West – Gold Digger

Work Session: Today it’s all about the benjamins – MONEY. Let’s start out by reading the series of quotes about money on page 81 in the American Lit springboard textbook. Any of these you particularly agree or disagree with? Why or why not?

After we discuss the quotes, let’s look at this poem, “Money,” by Dana Gioia. What do you think of this poem? It’s almost entirely made of idioms, or figures of speech, about money. There are quite a few, as you can see!

Next up, we will read this scene from A Raisin In The Sun. I’ll take a volunteer to be Mama, one for Ruth, and one for Walter. What are these characters’ attitudes towards money?

Finally, we’re going to put all our readings together (synthesize) and do the argumentative writing prompt on page 86 in your text: “Express a personal attitude towards money, incorporating quotations from one of the quotes about money, a line from the poem, and a statement from the excerpt of A Raisin In The Sun as either support for your position or a counterclaim that you take issue with.”

You’ll have the remainder of class to write this!

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!!!!

Assessment: Formative – class discussions, Formal – vocab quiz

Differentiation: Process – scaffolding

American Lit: Willing To Forgive

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can cite evidence to answer text-dependent questions.

Opening Session: What’s your opinion on a wife who is willing to forgive her cheating husband?

Work Session: Today we’re going to continue reading The Crucible, starting in Act II and reading as far as we can get today! From your opening session, you’ve probably guessed that a lot of today’s act focuses on Elizabeth’s relationship with John Proctor. We will read as much as we can, and stop fifteen minutes before the bell for our closing session.

Closing Session: Look at the following lyric from the Aretha Franklin song we listened to at the beginning of class:

Well, I’m willing to forgive you but I can’t forget, cause you really really really really hurt me this time.  Well, I guess I can go on— 

 Discuss how the above line from Aretha Franklin’s Willing to Forgive applies to Elizabeth in the section of the text we read today.

Assessment: Informal – paragraph checks

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

 

American Lit: Hysteria!

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can relate the motif of hysteria in The Crucible to modern society.

Opening Session: Muse – Hysteria. Is this song a good representation of the concept of hysteria? What does it tell you about hysteria? Do you like it? Why or why not?

Work Session: Today we’re going to finish reading Act I of The Crucible in the book, then we’re going to flip to page 131 in Springboard and talk about hysteria. How do you see hysteria in the end of the act, when the girls are screaming out accusations?

How do you see hysteria in the real world?

Flip to the next page and choose one of the 3 scenarios under the Narrative Writing Prompt. Working on your own, write a short scene in which you show the scenario and how easily hysteria can happen.

Closing Session: Share your scenario!

Assessment: Informal – scenarios for completion

Differentiation: Process, product