Tag Archive for peer editing

Peer Editing!

Standard: 

  • ELAGSE9-10W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language Standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10.)

Learning Target: I can strengthen my writing by editing and revising with a partner, in order to make sure I have achieved the purpose of informing my audience about my social issue.

Opening Session: Today we’re going to be peer editing your social issue essays! Any edits you or your peer make will count as part of your final draft – as in, if you insert a comma or fix a typo, we will not count those as errors when grading your essay.

While Mrs. Jones passes back your printed essays and some markers, let’s go over these editing marks!

Work Session: Today you’re going to have the first 30 minutes of the work session to read and carefully edit your partner’s paper. You need to go through line by line and mark anything you see wrong or confusing. Read the paper out loud! Talk about it with your partner! Make comments as well as editing marks! Mrs. Jones, Ms. Hannah and I have not graded these yet, so this is your chance to make sure you have the best possible paper to turn in!

Here is your Peer Editing Checklist!

Social Issue Essay Peer Editing Checklist

Essay Author: ____________________ Edited by: ___________________

  • 12-point, Times New Roman, double spaced
  • MLA Heading (Student name, teacher name, class name, date)
  • Title
  • No extra space between paragraphs
  • Paragraphs are indented
  • Works Cited at the end
  • At least 2 sources cited in the paper and in the Works Cited
  • At least 4 quotes in the paper
  • You can identify the thesis statement (hint: last sentence of the first paragraph. Does it tell what the paper is going to be about?)
  • No contractions – write out words like “can’t” and “don’t” as “cannot” and “do not.”
  • Numbers should be written out in words (write “four” instead of “4”)
  • Check for capitalization errors (capitalize proper nouns, the beginning of a sentence, etc.)
  • Check for punctuation errors (period at the end of a sentence, commas in a list, etc.)
  • Check for word choice errors (your/you’re, too/to/two, their/there/they’re)
  • Check for spelling errors
  • Check for slang or “texting” abbreviations (b/c, u, ur, idk)
  • Underline and make a note about anything that confuses you.

After your partner has thoroughly edited your paper, you will have a chance to make your own changes and edits. Take the last 15 minutes of the work session to make your paper perfection!

Closing Session: Tomorrow we are going to be recording Flipgrid videos to give a mini-presentation of your social issue. Your video maxes out at 5 minutes, and you should use at least 3 of those minutes to explain your issue. Although you don’t want to just read your paper (booooor-ing!) you should use your paper as a guide to make sure you completely explain your social issue. Use the last few minutes of class to prep for Flipgrid, because we will be recording them tomorrow during class.

Assessment: Summative: Essays are a major grade

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding, graphic organizers, checklists)

World Lit: Peer Editing!!

Standard: 

  • ELAGSE9-10W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language Standards 1–3 up to and including grades 9–10.)

Learning Target: I can strengthen my writing by editing and revising with a partner, in order to make sure I have achieved the purpose of informing my audience about my social issue.

Opening Session: Today we’re going to be peer editing your social issue essays! Any edits you or your peer make will count as part of your final draft – as in, if you insert a comma or fix a typo, we will not count those as errors when grading your essay.

While Mrs. Jones passes back your printed essays and some markers, let’s go over these editing marks!

Work Session: Today you’re going to have the first 30 minutes of the work session to read and carefully edit your partner’s paper. You need to go through line by line and mark anything you see wrong or confusing. Read the paper out loud! Talk about it with your partner! Make comments as well as editing marks! Mrs. Jones, Ms. Hannah and I have not graded these yet, so this is your chance to make sure you have the best possible paper to turn in!

Here is your Peer Editing Checklist!

Social Issue Essay Peer Editing Checklist

Essay Author: ____________________ Edited by: ___________________

  • 12-point, Times New Roman, double spaced
  • MLA Heading (Student name, teacher name, class name, date)
  • Title
  • No extra space between paragraphs
  • Paragraphs are indented
  • Works Cited at the end
  • At least 2 sources cited in the paper and in the Works Cited
  • At least 4 quotes in the paper
  • You can identify the thesis statement (hint: last sentence of the first paragraph. Does it tell what the paper is going to be about?)
  • No contractions – write out words like “can’t” and “don’t” as “cannot” and “do not.”
  • Numbers should be written out in words (write “four” instead of “4”)
  • Check for capitalization errors (capitalize proper nouns, the beginning of a sentence, etc.)
  • Check for punctuation errors (period at the end of a sentence, commas in a list, etc.)
  • Check for word choice errors (your/you’re, too/to/two, their/there/they’re)
  • Check for spelling errors
  • Check for slang or “texting” abbreviations (b/c, u, ur, idk)
  • Underline and make a note about anything that confuses you.

After your partner has thoroughly edited your paper, you will have a chance to make your own changes and edits. Take the last 15 minutes of the work session to make your paper perfection!

Closing Session: Tomorrow we are going to be recording Flipgrid videos to give a mini-presentation of your social issue. Your video maxes out at 5 minutes, and you should use at least 3 of those minutes to explain your issue. Although you don’t want to just read your paper (booooor-ing!) you should use your paper as a guide to make sure you completely explain your social issue. Use the last few minutes of class to prep for Flipgrid, because we will be recording them tomorrow during class.

Assessment: Summative: Essays are a major grade

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding, graphic organizers, checklists)

AP Lang: The Declaration of Independence, Day 3

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its historical significance and context, as well as consider its rhetorical features, persuasiveness, and the narrative voice of the author.

Opening Session: Continue reading Anthem. You’re probably getting close to finishing at this point, and if you do, just switch to reading your Free Choice book in class.

Work Session:

Yesterday in class you wrote your own Declaration of Independence. Today, I would like for you to get with one partner (if we have an odd number, we can do one group of 3) and trade papers. Take five minutes or so to read your partner’s essay. Then, we’re going to spend ten or fifteen minutes doing a peer critique. Take a moment to jot down some notes and feedback for your partner. Consider the things we saw Rand change in the facsimile edition of Anthem. I’ll pass around some post-it notes so you don’t have to write on your partner’s paper. Once you’ve written some notes, I want you two to have a critical discussion about each others’ writing, and find some areas where you can improve or strengthen your Declaration.

After you’ve had a while to confer and then edit your own work, trade papers again with your neighbor. This time it’s not for a critique, but for a response. Consider how your partner has chosen to declare themselves independent, and then write a 1-2 paragraph response. Pretend you’re whomever is the target of your partner’s letter and respond to the grievances filed against you and your partner’s newly-declared independence.

You’ll have until just before the end of class to finish, when we will take some time to share 🙂

Closing Session:

Share out! Let’s have a couple partnerships share their declarations and responses with the class!

Assessment: Formative (Vocabulary quiz and journal check on Friday)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolded questions)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book; write a journal entry in which you pretend you’re King George III of England and write a response to Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence.

World Lit: How can I phrase this…

Standard: ELAGSE9-10L1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  1. Use parallel structure.*
  2. Use various types of phrases (noun, verb, adjectival, adverbial, participial, prepositional, absolute) and clauses (independent, dependent; noun, relative, adverbial) to convey specific meanings and add variety and interest to writing or presentations.

Learning Target: I can identify different types of phrases and use them in writing; I can revise writing to include phrases and parenthetical expressions.

Opening Session: Mental Floss – 38 Common Spelling and Grammar Mistakes

Work Session:

Welcome back to Monday, everyone! I know you’re SUPER EXCITED for today because it’s….GRAMMAR! Whoo! Okay, okay, I know, grammar isn’t your favorite, but this is important, and it WILL make us stronger writers. SO flip in your text to page 18, activity 1.4, and let’s learn about phrases!

After we go through activity 1.4 together, I am going to hand back out your constructed responses from Friday, along with some highlighters. I want you to go through your own writing and highlight where you have used at least 5 phrases. Then, trade with a buddy and have them identify the types of phrases you highlighted. Finally, trade back, and go through your writing with an editor’s eye. See if there are any places where you could have included, modified, or moved phrases around to strengthen your writing and show more of your individual voice.

Closing Session: To close out the day, I’m going to give you guys your first Vocabulary List! You can use the remaining time in class to look up the definitions of these words (hint: they’re in your text) and on Friday, we will have a vocab quiz, so get ready!!

  1. Indignity
  2. Reproach
  3. Listlessly
  4. Bellows
  5. Mesmerizing
  6. Trills
  7. Arpeggio
  8. Reverie
  9. Fiasco
  10. Nonchalantly

Differentiation: Process (differentiated vocabulary list as needed)

Assessment: Informal – check of students’ work with phrases.

Lab Day 2, Essays Due!

(look at that, I’m a poet and don’t know it! or do I?)

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Learning Target: I will finish writing my communism essay and peer edit a friend’s; I digitally turn in my essay.

Opening Session: An Editing Checklist to run through before you turn your paper in!

Work Session: Welcome to the lab for day 2! Today your goal is to finish typing your essay.

1st block: I’m going to give you the same timers you had yesterday so you can go through and systematically finish or edit each of your paragraphs:

  • 10 minutes for your introduction
  • 15 minutes for your first body paragraph
  • 15 minutes for your second body paragraph
  • 15 minutes for your third body paragraph…
  • …and the rest of class to work on a conclusion, a fourth body paragraph, or to revise your earlier paragraphs.

Honors: You guys should be more or less done with your essays, so you will do some peer editing. I want you to go on to our shared Google Drive folder, and open up a document that was uploaded by a friend in the class. This is important! You MUST turn on “Track Changes” in Word and use the Comment feature to peer edit!!! You are NOT supposed to just type over your friend’s essay. You need to make absolutely sure you’re using track changes and comments to do your editing!!

While you’re peer editing, I want you to check for the following things:

  • Is the essay written in the proper font and style (12 point Times New Roman double spaced, no extra spaces, no bold, italics only where needed)?
  • Is the MLA heading correct (Student Name, Teacher Name, Class Name, Date)?
  • Is there a centered title? No other formatting besides centering?
  • Indented paragraphs?
  • Does the author write in first person – I, me, me, you, us, we, our, your, etc.? If you find first person, suggest an alternate way to phrase things in a comment!
  • Does the author use contractions (don’t, can’t, won’t, etc.)? If you find any contractions, type out the complete words.
  • Are there any points in the essay where the author is unclear or drifts away from his or her main purpose? If so, put a comment on the paper and make a suggestion for fixing it.

At the end of class, make sure everything is saved and uploaded to Google Drive!

Closing Session: Essay Reflection TOTD – how did this essay go? What grade do you think you will get?

Assessment: Essays will be graded

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding questions); product (varied length as needed; quote requirements increased or decreased as needed).