Tag Archive for play

World Lit: A Doll House, Act I, part one

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I will read the first half of act I of A Doll’s House, analyzing the characters of Nora and Helmer through class discussions, focusing on how those characters develop a theme in the story.

Activator: A Probably Inadequate Summary of A Doll’s House:

Work Session: Well, as you might have guessed from our video, today we’re going to start reading out anchor text for this unit, A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen. YES, I REALIZE THE IRONY OF USING A PLAY WRITTEN BY A MAN IN A UNIT ABOUT FEMINISM. But this is one of the first feminist texts that was ever written, so that’s why we’re going with it. Also, it’s in our textbook, which makes life easier. (It used to be in our textbook, now I have really no excuse except it’s a good play and I like it.)

If you’re reading from home and/or ISS, here’s the full text online, and if listening instead of reading is more your style, here’s the full audiobook.

But today in class we’re going to choose characters and read aloud. I need volunteers for the following characters:

  • Nora (LONG PART)
  • Helmer (LONG PART!)
  • Porter
  • Maid
  • Mrs. Linde (LONG, but not as long as Nora or Helmer)

Don’t worry; if you volunteer to read today, you won’t have to read tomorrow (unless you volunteer again).

Our entire work session today will be reading and discussing the play!

Closing Session: For a little bit of fun before you go today, let’s check out this cool list together – Ten Amazing Women Who Led Rebellions!

Assessment: Formative assessment during discussions.

Differentiation: Varied length reading parts, learning style (audiobook vs text vs acting it out)

American Lit: The Crucible, Act I

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Learning Target: I can analyze a dramatic text to determine appropriate tone and inflection to convey meaning.

Opening Session: The Crucible movie trailer!

Work Session: Today our main focus will be reading the first half of act I of The Crucible, through Betty falling asleep on page 25 in the book. I will be reading as the narrator, and I need volunteers to read for each of the following parts:

  • Tituba
  • Parris
  • Abigail
  • Susanna
  • Mrs. Putnam
  • Putnam
  • Mercy
  • Mary
  • Betty
  • Proctor
  • The Narrator (Mrs. Bristow)

As we finish reading today, we will look into our textbooks, on page 124. I would like for you guys to start making notes about the various characters you met today on the note-taking chart. You should be able to fill out the notes and possibly motivations for each of the characters we met today, which is everyone on the chart except Francis and Rebecca Nurse, Reverend Hale, and Giles Corey (we will get to them tomorrow).

Closing Session: Vocab review – Crossword Puzzle!!

Assessment: Informal – class reading and discussion

Differentiation: Interest, Process (student choice in reading parts, varied reading lengths)

World Lit: Hector’s Death Skits

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia

Learning Target
Students will put on a play to display their knowledge of the Iliad.

Activator
We’re going to start the day by watching a scene from Troy and discussing how the movie producers and directors transferred the story to the screen.

Work Session
I’m going to divide the class into 3 groups. Your groups will each put on a dramatic presentation of how they interpret the events that occur in the “Death of Hector” from the Iliad. You can use the movie as inspiration, but remember what we discussed and how your might modify or adjust to fit the screen.

With about fifteen minutes left of class, I’ll call each group up to perform for us. Yes, this is a quick turnaround, and we all know it, so don’t freakout about being unprepared for the stage 🙂

Closer
Let’s vote and discuss! Who was the best? Why?

Assessment
Formative (plays)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, learning style); Product (different media possible for the plays)

World Lit: The Death of Hector Play

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia

Learning Target
Students will put on a play to display their knowledge of the Iliad.

Activator
We’re going to start the day by watching a scene from Troy and discussing how the movie producers and directors transferred the story to the screen.

Work Session
I’m going to divide the class into 3 groups. Your groups will each put on a dramatic presentation of how they interpret the events that occur in the “Death of Hector” from the Iliad. You can use the movie as inspiration, but remember what we discussed and how your might modify or adjust to fit the screen.

With about fifteen minutes left of class, I’ll call each group up to perform for us. Yes, this is a quick turnaround, and we all know it, so don’t freakout about being unprepared for the stage 🙂

Closer
Let’s vote and discuss! Who was the best? Why?

Assessment
Formative (plays)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, learning style); Product (different media possible for the plays)

World Lit: Act I, Scene Thursday

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand how Brutus feels conflicted about his role in Caesar’s assassination; I understand how Brutus’s motivations help advance the plot of the play.

Opening Session: A kind of weird but funny Caesar animation, just to get your laughing and activate your brains to reading! https://osborne10thlit.com/videos/drama/JuliusCaesartheHighlyCondensedVersion.wmv

Work Session: Today we need to spend most of class reading Julius Caesar. We have to finish act I, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but in reality act I has some of the most crucial parts of the play. As we read, we will pause frequently to discuss, but I want you to always keep these things in mind:

  • Why does Cassius want to kill Caesar?
  • Why does he need Brutus’s help?
  • How do the people feel about Caesar?
  • How does Brutus feel about Caesar – and why does that conflict with his feelings about Rome?

I want to focus in on some very specific lines and talk a bit about rhetoric as well today. In Cassius’s long speech in act I scene ii, he uses several tactics to convince Brutus that Caesar is not only ambitious, but that he’s unfit to rule anyway. After we read that, let’s go back and read it again, but this time, I’m going to get my bell out and ring it every time Cassius uses a rhetorical technique to try and convince Brutus.

Spoiler alert, he actually does win Brutus over to the cause, so I guess you can say it worked out well for him!

We will also read act I scene iii today, which is really there to set the mood more than anything.

Closing session: Ticket out the door: What is your impression of the characters in the play so far? I told you yesterday who the bad guys are, but what about Caesar? Does he sound like a super awesome person? What about Brutus? Does he sound like a good guy or a bad guy? Give me a short paragraph discussing what you think about the characters so far!

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed summatively, participation grades for readers and in-class discussions.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); kinesthetic learning style (a student could ring the bell).