Tag Archive for poetry journals

Review Monday

Good morning, everyone! Hope y’all had a good weekend!

Standard: ELA10RL4 The student employs a variety of writing genres to demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of significant ideas in selected literary works. The student composes essays, narratives, poems, or technical documents.

Learning Target: Students will review the figurative language concepts from this unit, as well as turn in their poetry journals.

Activator: Maya Angelou – And Still I Rise

Welcome back to Monday, everyone! I hope you guys had an awesome weekend and are now prepared for a little studying, because your poetry unit test is tomorrow!!

Today in class we’ll review our figurative language concepts with this snazzy PowerPoint, and then I’ve got a worksheet for you to do! This is actually the unit test that I gave last semester, so obviously you guys will take a different one tomorrow.

Your unit test tomorrow will consist of 30 multiple choice questions worth 2 points each, and a writing section worth 40 points. Yes, this means that if you  blow off the writing section, you will not pass the test.

Also, your poetry journals are due today. If you have any left to finish, now is a good time to do it, and once they’re done you should staple them together with a rubric on top so I can grade them all nice and easy. Let me know if you have any questions about how to finish your journals or do the figurative language worksheet, or about how you’ll be graded.

Computer Lab Thursday!

Standard: ELA10W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing.

Learning Target: Students will research and find their own poem for their poetry slam assignment, and complete their final poetry journal.

Activator: On Girls Lending Pens

Welcome to the computer lab, guys! My rules are pretty simple here – no eating or drinking in the lab, unless it’s a bottle with a top that screws on. No Ultrasurf or getting around the school’s internet filters by any other means. You have no reason to be on a website the school deems inappropriate, and no reason to use ultrasurf unless you’re getting onto one of those websites. Period. I will know, because I am a giant computer nerd, so don’t think you can trick me.

So! That out of the way, what are we doing here today, you ask? Well, I’m glad you asked!! Today I would like you to find your slam poem, and also to catch up on any poetry journals you might have missed. Here is the complete poetry journal list:

  1.  “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe
  2. “The Road Not Taken” (1st and 4th blocks) or “Nothing Gold Can Stay” (3rd block), both by Robert Frost
  3. “The Weary Blues” by Langston Hughes
  4. “Making a Fist” by Naomi Shihab Nye
  5. “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam
  6. “The Kraken” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  7. “Soneto XVII” by Pablo Neruda
  8. “Tell All the Truth but Tell It Slant –” or “The Wind Tapped Like a Tired Man –” by Emily Dickinson, your choice
  9. “Spring and All” by William Carlos Williams
  10. Your choice! Your slam poem is your 10th journal!

So, I’ll come around and help everyone individually find a poem they would like online, we’ll print them out and you can practice reading them. You should write your 10th poetry journal on your slam poem! If you end up with extra time at the end of class (perhaps you’ve already finished your poetry journals?) you can review for your test, which is coming on Tuesday, memorize your slam poem for tomorrow, or play around on USA Test Prep. There are no other options and nothing else acceptable to do.

So go forth and choose your poems, everyone!

Computer Lab Thursday!!

Standard: ELA10W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing.

Learning Target: Students will research and find their own poem for their poetry slam assignment, and complete their final poetry journal.

Activator: On Girls Lending Pens

Welcome to the computer lab, guys! My rules are pretty simple here – no eating or drinking in the lab, unless it’s a bottle with a top that screws on. No Ultrasurf or getting around the school’s internet filters by any other means. You have no reason to be on a website the school deems inappropriate, and no reason to use ultrasurf unless you’re getting onto one of those websites. Period. I will know, because I am a giant computer nerd, so don’t think you can trick me.

So! That out of the way, what are we doing here today, you ask? Well, I’m glad you asked!! Today I would like you to find your slam poem, and also to catch up on any poetry journals you might have missed. Here is the complete poetry journal list:

  1.  “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe
  2. “The Road Not Taken” (1st and 4th blocks) or “Nothing Gold Can Stay” (3rd block), both by Robert Frost
  3. “The Weary Blues” by Langston Hughes
  4. “Making a Fist” by Naomi Shihab Nye
  5. “Metaphor” by Eve Merriam
  6. “The Kraken” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
  7. “Soneto XVII” by Pablo Neruda
  8. “Tell All the Truth but Tell It Slant –” or “The Wind Tapped Like a Tired Man –” by Emily Dickinson, your choice
  9. “Spring and All” by William Carlos Williams
  10. Your choice! Your slam poem is your 10th journal!

So, I’ll come around and help everyone individually find a poem they would like online, we’ll print them out and you can practice reading them. You should write your 10th poetry journal on your slam poem! If you end up with extra time at the end of class (perhaps you’ve already finished your poetry journals?) you can review for your test, which is coming on Tuesday, memorize your slam poem for tomorrow, or play around on USA Test Prep. There are no other options and nothing else acceptable to do.

So go forth and choose your poems, everyone!

Breyonna, THIS is how it affects your life!

Standard: ELA10RL3 The student deepens understanding of literary works by relating them to contemporary context or historical background, as well as to works from other time periods.

Learning Target: Students will see real-life examples of figurative language in music, and complete their 9th poetry journal.

Activator: Poetry with Cookie Monster

So, today we did a figurative language activity that involved looking at examples of the figurative language we’ve studied in music. I tried to get songs that would appeal to all of your varied tastes in music, so I hope you enjoyed!

Literary Devices in Music

I can’t upload the music files, but hopefully this PowerPoint will give you the examples and lyrics, which should be enough to get the gist of it :)

We also read another poem and did our second-to-last journal today!! Our last journal will be done tomorrow, so we’re seriously almost done!! YAAAY!!

“Spring and All” by William Carlos Williams

Tomorrow, we’re going to the computer lab, where each of you guys will have some time to track down the poem you want to read for your slam. Remember, this can be any poem you want – one of your own composition, something random you find online, a famous poem, anything! Just please keep it school-appropriate. Remember: if your grandma wouldn’t want to hear you say it, I don’t want to hear it either.

The computer lab schedule will be really wonky tomorrow, since we’re gonna be in three different labs (woo!) but I think we can work it out. The important thing to remember is that we’re so close to done with poetry, I can taste the short stories on the horizon!

Remember! Poetry slam on Friday, and your test is on Tuesday!!!

Tell All the Truth to the Tired Man

Standard: ELA10RL5 The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses it correctly in reading and writing.

Learning Target: Students will learn a little about Emily Dickinson and begin to understand what poetic meter is, as well as attempt to write in iambic pentameter.

Activator: Emily Dickinson Rap

…and then we got into an Emily Dickinson poem! There are two of them in our textbook: Tell All the Truth But Tell It Slant – and The Wind Tapped Like a Tired Man. After talking about a little bit of Emily Dickinson’s History, we discussed poetic meter. This is a tough concept, and something we’ll talk about more and more, but we’re learning about it bit by bit. Here’s our PowerPoint on poetic meter, as well as an example song that’s written in Iambic Pentameter.

Poetic Meter

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air Theme

Here’s another illustration that may help you out with hearing poetic meter. This is a video taken from the game DJ Hero. In this game, a singer needs to emphasize certain words (represented by dots) to properly rap along, and the game illustrates this by making the stressed words into larger dots than the unstressed words. This may help you “see” the meter, rather than hear it, if you’re a visual person.

DJ Hero and Poetic Meter

After talking more about iambic pentameter, I think we need a few minutes to catch up on your writing and to pick poems for our slam, which will be this Friday! I repeat, Poetry Slam is THIS FRIDAY!!! And of course, don’t forget your test is next Tuesday, that’s a week from today!!!

Finally, we wrote a poetry journal on one of the Dickinson poems. Your choice :) Now that we’ve done eight poetry journals, we only have TWO LEFT! And that’ll complete our writing assignment for this unit! WHOO!!!

BONUS! MC Lars – Annabel Lee RIP