Tag Archive for reading aloud

We’re going to have to readjust your rations, kids.

Standard: RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: Students will read chapters 7-8 of Animal Farm, popcorn style, and reflect on the changes that have taken place at the farm.

Activator: Crash Course in World History: Capitalism and Communism!

Not much to say today :) We get an awesome video by John Green, then we’re diving back into Animal Farm! We’re going to read chapters 7-8 today, popcorn style! I like it when we take turns reading aloud :D

After we finish our reading today, I want you guys to take a moment to write a short reflection on what has happened so far in the book. Write a short paragraph for me that talks about these changes. What do you think went wrong on Animal Farm? Why did things change when they started out so well? What do you think will happen in the future?

 

That’s it for today, guys. Wait! I think I have a picture of a piggy!

Everywednesdayman, too!

Here is the link to the play, Everyman, for those of you reading from home or ISS.

If you’re reading from home, please read and write a summary or review of the play, explaining what happened and what you thought about it.

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning target: Students will finish reading Everyman and interview a reader (or be interviewed); then, they will write a critical review of the play.

Activator:

Welcome back to Wednesday, everyone! Hopefully I’m feeling better today, I had kind of a crappy Tuesday of not feeling so well. But I seem to be bouncing back 🙂

Anyway, there’s not much to say about today, as we’re just going to finish going over vocabulary and reading Everyman. After we finish the play, if you were not a reader, I’d like you to partner up with someone who was, and ask them the following questions:

  1. What part did you play? Were you a real person, an abstract concept, or a religious figure?
  2. How did your part react to Everyman’s request to accompany him to death?
  3. Why did you react that way?
  4. What are you supposed to teach the audience?

You may have to modify the questions to suit your needs. Afterwards, I would like you and your partner to work together to write a critical review of the play, as though you are a newspaper columnist.

  • In two to three GOOD paragraphs, not shortypants ones, summarize the plot of Everyman and tell me what you thought. Did the play teach its lesson as intended? Did the characters represent what they were supposed to? Do you understand the moral of the story?

…and that’s it for today!! Tomorrow we’ll finish this up if we need to (we might need to….) and then move on to our next project!!

English or Italian Wednesday

Welcome back!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning target: Students will continue to compose their own sonnets and read Oedipus the King.

Activator: B.O.B. – Airplanes

So, my apologies in advance, but today will be a short post, as I’m nearing the end of National Novel Writing Month and I’m, unfortunately, nowhere near finished. That means you guys get a shorter blog post than normal today while I try to catch up to par.

ANYWAY, today we’re reading the rest of part 1 of Oedipus, which we started yesterday, and we’ll read in the same format we did yesterday as well. Afterwards, we’ll continue our sonnet composition. If we have oodles and oodles of extra time, we’ll go over a PowerPoint I have on iambic pentameter and poetic meter. WHEE!