Tag Archive for six word memoirs

Let’s do something…creative.

Welcome to Friday!!! TOMORROW IS THE WEEKEND!!!

I’m plugging away on your 6 word memoir video – it’s almost done! I just need to do the finishing touches and we’ll watch it next week 🙂

Today, though, we’re going to start a project that I think should be rather fun. It’s a creative writing assignment, which is something we haven’t done at all this semester, so I hope you like it! There is no word count required. You can write to one of these prompts below, or do your own thing. I’m grading it for effort and completion – so you have to actually do it, but I’m not going to be your literary critic when it comes to this piece.

You have five options:

  1. Write a letter to a rising 10th grader (a current 9th grader) telling them about what it’s like to be a sophomore. How is it different than being a freshman? What are classes like? What are your friends like? What’s it like to be out of the freshmen building? Who are the teachers and what are they like? Are you getting ready for college or post-high school? Do you turn 16, learn to drive, and so on? Give any advice you think someone should know before they start their sophomore year.
  2. Write a poem about your sophomore year. Any genre, any format, any length, any rhyme scheme or none at all. However you would like. Consider using a format such as a villanelle, sestina, or sonnet. See me if you don’t know what that means. Or write free verse, rap lyrics, couplets, whatever. Just compose something poetic about your year.
  3. Write a reflection on your sophomore year. What have you learned? How has your life changed? Where were you in August vs. where are you now? What happened in each month to change your live for the better or worse? What are your plans for the summer? Where do you expect to be next year? What have you done this year that you thought was impossible? What have you failed at doing? Did you have goals that were achieved and goals that were not?
  4. Write a letter to yourself to be delivered at the end of your junior year. You can ask yourself anything, tell yourself anything, remind yourself of anything. How would you define yourself right now? What are you hoping to change? What about this moment – the last week of your sophomore year – do you want to hold on to in the future?
  5. Write about who you are right this very second. Describe everything about you – your likes, dislikes, wants, needs, desires, hopes, dreams, appearence, obsession, favorite song, favorite food, and so on. Write down every single thing about you that you can think of at this very moment. Put your 10th-grade pre-summer self down on paper.

Okay, so here’s the deal with these – I want you guys to be able to look back on who you are at this moment and remember exactly what it is to be at the precipice of your junior year. Why? Well, have you ever felt like your parents, teachers, and everyone else in the world has completely forgotten what it was like to be a teenager? Have you ever thought that, even though you know at one time they were 16 years old, they have no idea what it’s like to be 16? I don’t want you guys to forget your 16-year-old selves. I want you to remember who you are in this moment and be able to look back and say “oh yeah, that was me!”

So, that in mind, we’re also going to fill out an envelope. I want you to address the envelope to yourself. I’ll keep them, and at the end of next year, I’ll mail them to you. So a year later, you’ll be able to remember this very second, about to step into summer 🙂

Everyone ready? You have the rest of class and all day Monday.

Go!

Done With Oedipus Already? Cool!

Standard: RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: Students will finish reading Oedipus and write an impromptu essay about the play.

Activator: Six Word Memoirs, Fall 2012

Welcome back to class, everyone! I hope your week has started off well :)

Today we’re going to finish reading Oedipus the King, the same way we’ve been reading it so far. Afterwards, I’d like you guys to do a short writing assignment before we review our figurative language. Here’s the deal, and… guess what! You have a choice!!

Option A: Pretend you are Oedipus. Before you blind yourself, write a letter to the people of Thebes explaining what has happened. Do you feel guilty? Should you have listened to the prophet? What advice do you have for the people you used to rule? How are you going to punish yourself for what you’ve done and why? Give me 2-4 paragraphs, and don’t forget to put it in letter format!

Option B: We talked several times about the tragic flaw in Oedipus, which, in this case, was hubris. Hubris is an extreme pride and way of thinking that you’re better than everyone else or exempt from the same restraints as everyone else. How would the story of Oedipus differed if he had not had this tragic flaw? Write a  summary in 2-4 paragraphs where you explain how Oedipus the King would have turned out if he had not had this tragic flaw.

You guys will have about half an hour to do this, depending on how long it takes us to read. After we finish writing, we’ll do a quick review of our iambic pentameter and some six word memoirs!!. That’s Tuesday! Tomorrow…more poetry!

Can we start the end-of-the-year countdown yet?

Welcome back after your weekend, everyone! Only two more weeks, then finals, then summer break! We’re almost there!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will continue their reading of Oedipus the King, review their literary device vocabulary, and then work on a 6-word memoir.

Activator: Osborne 10th Lit 2011-2012 6-Word Memoirs, set to “We are Young”  by Fun.

So, today we’re going to dive right back into Oedipus after we finish our daily video. Today we have Jocasta, Messenger, Oedipus, Herdsman, and everyone else will read as the Chorus. We’re reading the first scene of part II today, which runs from page 503 in your book to page 512. Remember, everyone reads as the Chorus, so let’s all do it together!

After we finish this, we’re going to learn about iambic pentameter! YAY!!!! There’s this cool PowerPoint I’ve got, and you all don’t even need to take notes on it, because when we finish it you get to make your SONNET into iambic pentameter!! Here’s a tip: generally, if you put your sonnet to 10 syllables a line, it’ll just naturally be pretty close to iambic, and it’ll definitely be pentameter.

Finally, we’re going to do six word memoirs. This is probably my favorite assignment all year! Here’s the deal: You’re going to write a story using exactly six words. Legend has it, famous author Ernest Hemmingway was given a challenge: Tell a story in 6 words or less. His answer? “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” Tells a whole story, doesn’t it? So now, I challenge you to do the same thing. The video we watched earlier contained six word memoirs from my classes last year. Today you’ll work on writing those memoirs, and on the Monday of finals week, our daily video will be created by me, out of all of your memoirs. Yay!

That’s all we have for today, everyone, so have an awesome day and I’ll see you tomorrow!

Fall 2012 Six Word Memoirs

For those if you looking for our Six Word Memoir video, here is the link!

Six Word Memoirs

The Tragic Tuesday Ending…

Standard: RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: Students will finish reading Oedipus and write an impromptu essay about the play.

Activator: Weezer – In The Garage

Welcome back to class, everyone! I hope your week has started off well 🙂

Today we’re going to finish reading Oedipus the King, the same way we’ve been reading it so far. Afterwards, I’d like you guys to do a short writing assignment before we review our figurative language. Here’s the deal, and… guess what! You have a choice!!

Option A: Pretend you are Oedipus. Before you blind yourself, write a letter to the people of Thebes explaining what has happened. Do you feel guilty? Should you have listened to the prophet? What advice do you have for the people you used to rule? How are you going to punish yourself for what you’ve done and why? Give me 2-4 paragraphs, and don’t forget to put it in letter format!

Option B: We talked several times about the tragic flaw in Oedipus, which, in this case, was hubris. Hubris is an extreme pride and way of thinking that you’re better than everyone else or exempt from the same restraints as everyone else. How would the story of Oedipus differed if he had not had this tragic flaw? Write a  summary in 2-4 paragraphs where you explain how Oedipus the King would have turned out if he had not had this tragic flaw.

You guys will have about half an hour to do this, depending on how long it takes us to read. After we finish writing, we’ll do a quick review of our figurative language. That’s Tuesday! Tomorrow…more poetry!