Tag Archive for skit

World Lit: Hector’s Death Skits

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia

Learning Target
Students will put on a play to display their knowledge of the Iliad.

Activator
We’re going to start the day by watching a scene from Troy and discussing how the movie producers and directors transferred the story to the screen.

Work Session
I’m going to divide the class into 3 groups. Your groups will each put on a dramatic presentation of how they interpret the events that occur in the “Death of Hector” from the Iliad. You can use the movie as inspiration, but remember what we discussed and how your might modify or adjust to fit the screen.

With about fifteen minutes left of class, I’ll call each group up to perform for us. Yes, this is a quick turnaround, and we all know it, so don’t freakout about being unprepared for the stage 🙂

Closer
Let’s vote and discuss! Who was the best? Why?

Assessment
Formative (plays)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, learning style); Product (different media possible for the plays)

World Lit: The Death of Hector Play

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia

Learning Target
Students will put on a play to display their knowledge of the Iliad.

Activator
We’re going to start the day by watching a scene from Troy and discussing how the movie producers and directors transferred the story to the screen.

Work Session
I’m going to divide the class into 3 groups. Your groups will each put on a dramatic presentation of how they interpret the events that occur in the “Death of Hector” from the Iliad. You can use the movie as inspiration, but remember what we discussed and how your might modify or adjust to fit the screen.

With about fifteen minutes left of class, I’ll call each group up to perform for us. Yes, this is a quick turnaround, and we all know it, so don’t freakout about being unprepared for the stage 🙂

Closer
Let’s vote and discuss! Who was the best? Why?

Assessment
Formative (plays)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, learning style); Product (different media possible for the plays)

American Lit: Rehearsing and Recording Your Scene!

Standard: ELAGSE11-12W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can generate social commentary within a dramatic script.

Opening Session: If you need a laptop, grab it! Otherwise, get our your completed script!

Work Session: Your goal today is to finish writing, rehearsing, and recording your dramatic scene. You MUST have me check off your completed script – and once you’ve done that, I will give you a pass to anywhere on campus (except the gym) and you can go rehearse, perform, and record your scene. I encourage you to use the many resources this campus has to offer, especially because this building is getting torn down over the summer and things are going to look dramatically different next year! (dramatically. See what I did there?)

You will have the entire class period to work on this, but you must be back by 3:15 so we can do your Vocab quiz.

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!!!!

Assessment: Formal – EA2 will be graded

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Interest (student choice)

American Lit: Integrity Rises to the Top: Writing Dialogue

Standard: ELAGSE11-12W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target:  I can analyze the use of dialogue and character interactions in a dramatic text.

Opening Session: Quickwrite: do question 3 on page 159 in your book, coming up with as many adjectives as you can to describe Hale, Proctor, and Corey

Work Session: Today we are going to be in Springboard all day, on page 159 and onwards, working on writing dialogue. Since you guys are going to be finishing writing your Embedded Assessment skit on Monday and Tuesday, recording on Wednesday and showing off on Thursday, you will need to know a little about writing dialogue. Let’s read the examples and types together on page 160 and 161 and make sure we all understand them! We will do a little informal quiz afterwards.

Next, go on to page 162, Contemporary Conflicts, and get with your partner for the embedded assessment. Together, I would like for you to do the preparation work for your EA1, and fill in the chart on page 163. At the end of class, you will need to be able to tell me what issue you’re going to be writing about.

Closing Session: TOTD: Write your issue and parallel setting down and turn it in!!

Assessment: EA1 will be formally assessed.

Differentiation: Student choice, process (scaffolding)

American Lit: Speaking Out

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can research the historical context of a literary work to understand the social commentary it is presenting.

Opening Session: Crash Course: McCarthyism

Work Session: Welcome to Tuesday! Today we’re discussing what The Crucible is really about – witch hunts. No, not like that! It’s REALLY a social commentary on America in the 1950s. To get a handle on this, let’s read an article on page 149 of your Springboard book, entitled “Why I Wrote the Crucible” by Arthur Miller (spoiler alert, he wrote The Crucible). We will learn what he was intending to do with his work and get some historical context.

After we read this, I want to start working on your first embedded assessment for this unit. Grab a partner (everyone needs a partner!) who you want to work with for this assignment, and start brainstorming a social issue you want to tackle in your first embedded assessment, which is writing and performing a scene for the class.

We will discuss some social issue options first, and then you will work with your partner to choose one and start considering options for how you will present it in your scene. You will need to turn this in at the end of the day.

Closing Session: TOTD: What was Miller’s purpose in writing The Crucible?

Assessment: EA1 will be formally assessed

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Student Choice