Tag Archive for sparknotes

American Lit: The Crucible, Act I, Continued

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Learning Target: I can analyze a dramatic text to determine appropriate tone and inflection to convey meaning.

Opening Session: Video SparkNotes on The Crucible

Work Session: Today our main focus will be finishing act I of The Crucible, through the end of the act. I will be reading as the narrator, and I need volunteers to read for each of the following parts:

  • Tituba
  • Parris
  • Abigail
  • Susanna
  • Mrs. Putnam
  • Putnam
  • Mercy
  • Mary
  • Betty
  • Proctor
  • The Narrator (Mrs. Bristow)

As we finish reading today, we’ll work on activity 2.5 on page 127 of your books.

Closing Session: Vocab QUIZ!

Assessment: Informal – class reading and discussion

Differentiation: Interest, Process (student choice in reading parts, varied reading lengths)

World Lit: Welcome to Julius Caesar!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

 Learning Target: I can understand the historical and cultural context of Julius Caesar and how it relates to the modern day.

Opening Session: Sparknotes Summary video: This will give everyone a good overview of Julius Caesar with a pretty detailed but basic explanation of the plot.

Work Session: Today we’re going to start off with a little bit of background info. I have a powerpoint that goes over some background information on Julius Caesar, to give you guys some historical context, and I would like you all to take notes while we talk about it. YES, I know, that notes are BORING and you HATE them, but it really is true that if you write something down you’re more likely to remember it. Reading this play requires some knowledge of Roman culture and customs, and since our standard is to analyze a cultural experience from outside the United States, I think it’s important that you know what that culture is all about. I have guided notes if anyone needs them J

After we finish our notes, we’re going to assign characters in the play, Julius Caesar. You will keep your character for the entire play and you should be ready to read as soon as your name comes up, so you should be following along! I know not everyone likes to read aloud, so I will try and make sure that you get a shorter or smaller part if being dramatic just ain’t yo thang.

After we all have our parts, we’re going to get right into it and read Act I scene i!

Closing session:

Ticket out the door: 3-2-1: 3 things that are still relevant about Julius Caesar today (hint: think of theme), 2 things you are excited to learn, 1 goal you have for this unit.

VOCAB!

  1. Cobbler
  2. Knave
  3. Cull
  4. Exalted
  5. Vulgar
  6. Shrill (or shriller)
  7. Hinder
  8. Countenance
  9. Construe
  10. Cogitations

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed formatively, participation grades for readers.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); process (guided notes).

World Lit: Things Fall Apart, Day 4

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them.

Learning Target: I can analyze a the author’s choices of structure and series of events in Things Fall Apart.

Opening Session: Things Fall Apart Summary, ala Shmoop

Work Session: Today we are continuing to read Things Fall Apart! We are going to read chapters 7 and 13 today – we are skipping a chunk in the middle of the book, chapters 8-12. So to make sure we’re all on the same page, I am going to read a couple summaries to you, just so we’re all caught up.

Ch. 8: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/things/section3.rhtml

Ch. 9-11: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/things/section4.rhtml

Ch. 12: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/things/section5.rhtml

After we read the summaries, we will pick back up reading chapter 13 of the book.

Closing Session: Let’s analyze a bit of the author’s purpose here. For a TOTD, share out why you think Achebe decided to include this large section smack dab in the middle of his book that doesn’t have a lot of relevance to this main plot.

Also VOCAB!

1.      haggle: an instance of intense argument (as in bargaining)

2.      coiffure: the arrangement of the hair

3.      callow: young and inexperienced

4.      pestle: a hand tool for grinding and mixing substances in a mortar

5.      foolhardy: marked by defiant disregard for danger or consequences

6.      frond: compound leaf of a fern or palm or cycad

7.      succulent: full of juice

8.      pandemonium: a state of extreme confusion and disorder

9.      stingy: unwilling to spend

10.   harbinger: something indicating the approach of something or someone

Assessment: Formative (read alouds, class discussions)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding)

American Lit: Act II, Scene ii

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

Learning Target: I can analyze how Miller’s choice to edit Act II scene ii out of the play changed the play, for better or worse.

Opening Session: The Crucible Sparknotes Summary

Work Session: Grab your Crucible copies and flip to the very back, at the appendix! You will notice “deleted scene” is there – WOAH. It’s like the special features on a Blu-ray, only it’s a BOOK. Madness!

Today you will be independently reading that scene and doing a little writing. I will give you a brief constructed response sheet and I would like you to all respond to the following prompt:

Arthur Miller chose to delete Act II Scene ii from the play after it originally was performed. Why do you think he chose to delete this scene from the play? Do you think it was beneficial (good) or detrimental (bad) to the play to delete this scene? If YOU were putting on a stage performance of The Crucible, would you include this scene? If yes, why, and what do you think it adds to the play? If no, why not, and what do you think it takes away from the play?

You will have all class period to get this finished, and yes, it WILL be graded!!

Closing Session: Share out! Let’s take a poll – who would include the scene? Who would delete it?

Assessment: Informal – graded for completion

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

World Lit: Welcome to Julius Caesar!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

 Learning Target: I can understand the historical and cultural context of Julius Caesar and how it relates to the modern day.

Opening Session: Sparknotes Summary video: This will give everyone a good overview of Julius Caesar with a pretty detailed but basic explanation of the plot.

Work Session: Today we’re going to start off with a little bit of background info. I have a powerpoint that goes over some background information on Julius Caesar, to give you guys some historical context, and I would like you all to take notes while we talk about it. YES, I know, that notes are BORING and you HATE them, but it really is true that if you write something down you’re more likely to remember it. Reading this play requires some knowledge of Roman culture and customs, and since our standard is to analyze a cultural experience from outside the United States, I think it’s important that you know what that culture is all about. I have guided notes if anyone needs them J

After we finish our notes, we’re going to assign characters in the play, Julius Caesar. You will keep your character for the entire play and you should be ready to read as soon as your name comes up, so you should be following along! I know not everyone likes to read aloud, so I will try and make sure that you get a shorter or smaller part if being dramatic just ain’t yo thang.

After we all have our parts, we’re going to get right into it and read Act I scene i!

Closing session:

Ticket out the door: 3-2-1: 3 things that are still relevant about Julius Caesar today (hint: think of theme), 2 things you are excited to learn, 1 goal you have for this unit.

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed formatively, participation grades for readers.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); process (guided notes).