Tag Archive for sparknotes

American Lit: Welcome to UNIT 2!!

Today we begin a new unit (yes, right before a long weekend! This was fabulous planning on my part. Flawless, really.) on Arthur Miller’s famous play The Crucible, and on The Power of Persuasion!

Standard: ELAGSE11-12L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.

Learning Target: I can identify and analyze the skills and knowledge necessary for success in completing the Embedded Assessments for this unit.

Opening Session: Sparknotes Summary: Arthur Miller’s The Crucible

Work Session: We will begin today, as every Friday, by taking your vocab quiz!!

After your quiz, we have a few minutes left to preview this unit, so flip to page 108 in your text and we will do the Previewing the Unit activity. We want to unpack the first embedded assessment, as well!

This should take us right up to the end of class, and then we will say adios for a LONG WEEKEND! Go have fun at Dragon*Con or something!

Closing Session: Let’s wrap up the previous unit by giving any feedback you have about it 🙂

Assessment: Formal (vocab quiz)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding), Product (modified embedded assessment)

OMNOMNOMNOM GLUTTONY

Standard:

  • 9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Learning Target: I will learn about circle 3, then I will analyze design choices of an artist’s interpretation of the 9 circles of Hell as characters, understanding what the artist chose to emphasize in their treatment of Dante’s work.

Opening Session: Daily video! You know I can’t let you get away without watching ThugNotes! 

Work Session: Welcome to Circle 3: GLUTTONY!

Today we are going to read a Sparknotes Summary of circle 3, canto VI. This particular circle isn’t in our book, so we’re turning to some outside sources for it. After we finish the discussion of the circle, you’ll do your collaborative poster project activity for the day, and then…. dundunDUN! We have a VIDEO!

This is an episode of the TV show Face Off, which is on Syfy, and it’s all about movie makeups. In this challenge, the contestants had to make characters inspired by Dante’s Inferno, which I think you will appreciate

http://www.syfy.com/faceoff/videos/509-mortal-sins

After we watch the video, we will end class with this prompt: The guy that went home on Face Off. What did he do wrong? If you had his assignment in the challenge, how would you interpret it and what would you create? Be creative, feel free to draw a picture!

Closing Session: Ticket out the door: Poster project activity (see Monday’s post…or the sheet I gave you… you know, the one you kept in your binder, right? yeah that one…)

Assessment: Prompt responses will be graded; TOTDs will be graded at the end of the unit.

Differentiation: Process (student choice in poster activity); Product (various media of responses to prompt).

 

Welcome to Caesar!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

 Learning Target: I can understand the historical and cultural context of Julius Caesar and how it relates to the modern day.

Opening Session: Sparknotes Summary video: This will give everyone a good overview of Julius Caesar with a pretty detailed but basic explanation of the plot.

Work Session: Today we’re going to start off with a little bit of background info. I have a powerpoint that goes over some background information on Julius Caesar, to give you guys some historical context, and I would like you all to take notes while we talk about it. YES, I know, that notes are BORING and you HATE them, but it really is true that if you write something down you’re more likely to remember it. Reading this play requires some knowledge of Roman culture and customs, and since our standard is to analyze a cultural experience from outside the United States, I think it’s important that you know what that culture is all about. I have guided notes if anyone needs them J

After we finish our notes, we’re going to assign characters in the play, Julius Caesar. You will keep your character for the entire play and you should be ready to read as soon as your name comes up, so you should be following along! I know not everyone likes to read aloud, so I will try and make sure that you get a shorter or smaller part if being dramatic just ain’t yo thang.

After we all have our parts, we’re going to get right into it and read Act I scene i!

Closing session:

Ticket out the door: 3-2-1: 3 things that are still relevant about Julius Caesar today (hint: think of theme), 2 things you are excited to learn, 1 goal you have for this unit.

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed formatively, participation grades for readers.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); process (guided notes).

Be Greedy for Monday

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Learning Target: I will understand circle 4 of Dante’s Inferno and how the punishment fits the law of symbolic retribution; I will participate in a collaborative discussion with my classmates about capital punishment.

Opening Session: Daily video! Some overview of the debate that we’re going to have today, which is about capital punishment (AKA the death penalty).

Work Session: Welcome to Monday!

Today we’re studying greed – the avaricious and prodigal, or in other words, those who hoard (keep everything) and those who squander (waste everything). We’re going to start out with our Cliff Notes summary of this circle, since we aren’t reading it out of the book. Next, we are going to have a little debate!!

You may have noticed that the desks are in rows that face each other with an aisle between you. Today we’re going to have a stone throwing debate! Because the punishment in circle 4 is to push giant rocks into one another, you’re going to be doing something similar with your papers. I’ve got a sheet with 5 questions on it for each of you. You’re going to have 5 minutes to write on any one of the questions. Then, you’re going to crumble up your paper and throw it at the person across from you, just like the sinners in circle 4 did. When you get the paper your partner throws at you, unfold it, and you’ll have 5 minutes to either write about a new question OR respond to your partner’s writing.

We will swap papers 6 times, so you’ll end with your original paper and you get the last word 🙂then flatten them out and turn them in!!

Here are the questions, for those of you playing along from home:

  1. In Dante’s Hell, the punishment must fit the crime. This is based on ancient laws like Hammurabi’s code (“An eye for an eye”). Do you agree with this? Why or why not?
  2. In our modern legal system, almost all punishments are going to jail or probation. Do you think these punishments “fit the crime”? Give an example of a time when jail is NOT “fitting.”
  3. Worldwide, only 37 countries in the entire world still have the death penalty. In North and South America, only 2 countries still have the death penalty (USA and St. Kitts & Nevis). Why do you think so few countries have the death penalty in 2016?
  4. In the United States, only 56% of people support the death penalty. Since such a large group of Americans do not support the death penalty, why do you think we still have it?
  5. Last year (2015), the United States executed 28 people. The only countries that executed more people than the USA were Iran, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. What do you know about those 3 countries? What does that say about the USA?

Closing Session: Ticket out the door – 3-2-1: Write 3 things you learned today, 2 questions you still have, and 1 thing that surprised you.

Assessment: Debate sheets may be summatively assessed; Formative assessment of TOTDs.

Differentiation: Process (students may avoid throwing if needed); Content (alternate debate topic if needed).

OMNOMNOMNOM GLUTTONY!!

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.7. Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Learning Target: I will learn about circle 3, then I will analyze design choices of an artist’s interpretation of the 9 circles of Hell as characters, understanding what the artist chose to emphasize in their treatment of Dante’s work.

Opening Session: Daily video! You know I can’t let you get away without watching ThugNotes! 

Work Session: Welcome to Circle 3: GLUTTONY!

Today we are going to read a Sparknotes Summary of circle 3, canto VI. This particular circle isn’t in our book, so we’re turning to some outside sources for it. After we finish the discussion of the circle, you’ll do your collaborative poster project activity for the day, and then…. dundunDUN! We have a VIDEO!

This is an episode of the TV show Face Off, which is on Syfy, and it’s all about movie makeups. In this challenge, the contestants had to make characters inspired by Dante’s Inferno, which I think you will appreciate 🙂

http://www.syfy.com/faceoff/videos/509-mortal-sins

After we watch the video, we will end class with this prompt: The guy that went home on Face Off. What did he do wrong? If you had his assignment in the challenge, how would you interpret it and what would you create? Be creative, feel free to draw a picture!

Closing Session: Ticket out the door: Poster project activity (see Monday’s post…or the sheet I gave you… you know, the one you kept in your binder, right? yeah that one…)

Assessment: Prompt responses will be graded; TOTDs will be graded at the end of the unit.

Differentiation: Process (student choice in poster activity); Product (various media of responses to prompt).