Tag Archive for springboard

Things Fall Apart, Day 2

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the particular point of view of Things Fall Apart, a piece of literature from the Ibo culture of Africa.
  • I can analyze the development of the character Okonkwo and consider how his character helps develop the overall theme of Things Fall Apart.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • Listen and Consider – Listen to the reading of the poem, “The Second Coming” by W.B. Yeats, which your teacher will play for you. Chinua Achebe took the title of Things Fall Apart from this poem. Write a couple sentences in which you analyze WHY Achebe might have chosen to title his book after this poem.

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find Chapters 3-4 of Things Fall Apart. 
  • Find your first Literary Circle Job.
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find the small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

Proverbs (Springboard page 221) – There are a lot of proverbs used in Things Fall Apart. Complete the chart below with the meaning of each proverb. You can look in your Springboard book on page 221 if you need help.

Things Fall Apart, Day 1

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the particular point of view of Things Fall Apart, a piece of literature from the Ibo culture of Africa.
  • I can analyze the development of the character Okonkwo and consider how his character helps develop the overall theme of Things Fall Apart.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • VOCAB WORDS! Define these ten words:
    1. Harmattan
    2. Clan
    3. Improvident
    4. Orator
    5. Haggard
    6. Gnashed
    7. Plaintive
    8. Capricious
    9. Mirth
    10. Incipient

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find Chapters 1-2 of Things Fall Apart. 
  • Choose your first Literary Circle Job.
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find the small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

Culture Wheel (Springboard page 226) – Look in your Springboard book on page 226 for the Glossary of Selected Ibo Words and Phrases. Sort the words into categories and write them down on the Culture Wheel.

Taking a Stand Against Exploitation

Central Focus: Read an argument and analyze how the author builds it

Rationale: This lesson will help the students to identify persuasive language and evidence that the author has used in order to make their case about unjust treatment or situations. This will encourage and assist the students in incorporating persuasive language and evidence into their Social Issue Research Paper

Theme: Injustice

Text: Editorial (from Springboard): Diners should pay attention to workers, not just the food. Written for the Boston Globe by Kathleen Kingsbury. Video: Fox News Now – Phoenix – WORST TIPPERS: Study Shows That Millennials HATE to Tip

Content Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
  • ELAGSE9-10W9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • ELAGSE9-10W2: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • ELAGSE9-10W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • ELAGSE9-10W9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

Student Learning Goals and Objectives: 

  • Students will read an argument and analyze how the author builds it.
  • Students will critically think about a social issue.
  • Students will identify the evidence in a persuasive text.
  • Students will write clearly and coherently to respond to prompts.

Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks

Launch/Activating: ___5____ Minutes

Students will be asked to sit at their assigned seats and then to grab their copy of Springboard from the front of the room. The students will be asked to regain their seats as soon as possible and flip to page 210 in their Springboard.

Instruction: __20_____ Minutes

 We will spend 12 minutes reading the editorial on page 210 out loud. I will ask for a couple of volunteers to help with the reading and alternate between myself and the students whilst reading. Before we start reading, I will give the students a purpose for reading by instructing them to (these will also be written on the white board:

  • Underline any specific words or phrases that appeal to logic or emotion and are designed to persuade the reader.
  • Put a star next to the main claims the author makes.
  • Circle unknown words and phrases.

Then we will be watching a short video clip of a news clip from Fox News in Phoenix, titled WORST TIPPERS: Study Shows That Millennials HATE to Tip.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Qyr4rLynE8

Structured Practice and Application: ___35____ Minutes

The class will analyze the video clip together and draw parallels with the editorial text we read earlier. Some of the questions we will discuss are:

  • Is it fair to servers when they do not get paid a tip? Does anyone know someone who refuses to leave a tip or always finds an excuse to not leave a tip?
  • What about the idea of only going to restaurants where the workers are treated fairly and get benefits? Would you decide on which restaurant you want to eat at based on this?
  • Tipping in cash only? Who has cash on them? I know I don’t. I do tip always but typically on my card. What do you think? Is it fair that servers don’t receive all their tips?

Next students will get into groups of about 6 students by turning to face their classmates closest in proximity to them. They will do a second read as a group as the complete individually the four questions on page 212. As students reread the passage, they will consider how Kathleen Kingsbury uses:

  • evidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims
  • reasoning to develop ideas to connect claims and evidence
  • stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed

The students will use their previously done circling, staring and underlining to help them identify key words or elements. I will walk around and discuss with the students as they work in their groups.

Closure: __10____ Minutes

Come back together as a whole class. Ask students to read out loud some of their findings. Let’s discuss what we all identified and also the things that only a few identified.

Cultural Identity: Day 3, “By Any Other Name”

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze how an author presents a cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session
Think-Pair-Share: Look up the meaning and history of your name on BehindTheName.com (use your phone!). Tell your partner about your name, and share any interesting discoveries with the class.

Work Session
We’re going to read a story about names today! Flip in your Springboard to page 43, and let’s read “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau.

Please read with your table, alternating reading paragraphs aloud around the table. I’ll come around and help, monitor, and maybe jump in and read a little too 🙂 If your group finishes reading early, you can answer the Second Read questions on page 48 to help deepen your understanding of the story.

When everyone is done, let’s discuss this story. How does giving kids a “white” name help destroy their cultural identity?

Closing Session
Write a one-paragraph reflection: How would you have felt in Santha and Premila’s situation? How would you react if a teacher or  administrator took your name away on your first day of school?

Assessment
Formative (Class discussion, reflection paragraph, second read questions)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, vocab list, graphic organizer)

Cultural Identity: Day 2, “Two Kinds”

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze how an author presents a cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session
Amy Tan, the author of the story we’re going to read today, talks about writing from personal experience:

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading a story in Springboard called “Two Kinds,” by a Chinese-American author named Amy Tan. This story is taken from a larger work called The Joy Luck Club, which is so popular you might have heard of it before!

Flip in your Springboards to page 21, and let’s read together!
After we finish the story, let’s talk about cultural identity. What do you think Jing-mei’s cultural identity is? How would she describe herself? How does her cultural identity differ from that of her mother, and why?

If we have time, we will do the Working From the Text chart on page 32.

Closing Session
Think-Pair-Share! How did Tan develop Jing-mei’s cultural identity through narrative storytelling in “Two Kinds”?

Assessment
Formative (class discussions, think-pair-share, working from the text book check)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, slower reading, vocabulary list)