Tag Archive for sqprs

Love at first sight

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can consider the possibility of love at first sight by discussing with my class so that I can write about whether or not it is real.

Opening Session
Reading quiz! This quiz is over the reading you did yesterday, from page 71-103.

Work Session
my hero’s journey map worksheet continued (choose a map, label, boxes 1-3

Santiago falls in love with Fatima from the first moment he sees her. Do you believe in love at first sight?
Article: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/meet-catch-and-keep/201801/is-love-first-sight-real

Write a paragraph explaining if you think you could ever fall in love at first sight, and why or why not?

Closing Session
Continue your reading of The Alchemist to the end of page 127.

Assessment
Formative (reading quiz, fantasy map labels)

Differentiation
scaffolding, graphic organizers

Metamorphowednesday!

Standards

  • RL.9-10.6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • RL.9-10.10 By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9—10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Activator

Franz Kawhat?

Learning Target

Scholars will read an encyclopedia entry on monsters and begin their anchor text for this unit, Kafka’s “Metamorphosis”. They will look at the ideas of alienation and monstrosities as presented in Kafka’s work and continue to wrestle with the question of what makes a monster.

Work Session

Today we’re going to start reading our Big Reading for this unit, but FIRST we’re continuing with our nonfiction reading. Whoohoo! We’re starting off with an article that’s appropriately titled “What makes a monster scary?” You’re gonna SQUEEPERS again!!! When you get to the R for reading, I want you to read the article I give you in any way you choose (you may read silently then discuss with a partner, alternate paragraphs reading aloud, have one person read aloud to the other, whatever you like). After you’ve finished reading the article, consider the definitions you wrote yesterday and work with a partner or alone to revise your definitions into a new one.

Your end product should be a 2-3 sentence concise definition that accurately explains what it means to be a monster. Yes, I’m grading it this time.

After we finish with this article, we’re going to start reading our Big Reading for this unit. This is a story entitled “The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka. We watched a summary video of it at the beginning of class, but for simplicity’s sake let me give you a two-word run down of this story. It is 1.) Long and 2.) Complicated.

Excited yet? We’re going to listen to me read aloud for the first half of Part I of the story. That’s page 1066-1072 in our book, stopping at the end of the first paragraph on 1072. I would like for you to follow along in your book while you’re listening to me. If you’re reading online, you’re reading to the sentence “his sister began to cry.” We’re doing a bit of “I do, we do, you do” with this story. I’ll read part I aloud, we’ll read part II together, and part III you will read on your own 🙂

This is a VERY hard text, guys. So we’re going to run through it very slowly and carefully and do a lot of checks for understanding. I hope you enjoy the story! :)

Closing Session

Ticket out the door: 3 things you liked about the story, 2 things you didn’t like, and 1 question you still have.

Assessment

TOTD to check for understanding, definition of the word monster.

Differentiation

Students may read with their partners in any way that works best for them, differentiated/simplified texts, use of audio recording.

Monsters are OUT THERE!

Standards

L.9-10.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9—10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
L.9-10.4.a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
L.9-10.4.b Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).
L.9-10.4.d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
L.9-10.4.c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.
L.9-10.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

Activator

It’s MUPPET TIME!

 

Learning Target

Scholars will create their own definition of the word “monster,” examining what it means to be a monster, and look at the poem “Jabberwocky” to determine the meaning of words based on context, in addition to searching for their dictionary definitions.

Work Session

I hope you guys are psyched about our new unit, because I sure am! This is one of my favorite units so far, and I’m really excited to be teaching it to y’all. It’s all about….MONSTERS! I know, I know, I’m awesome, please hold your applause.

Anyway, today I would like to start out by asking YOU all a question! On a little sheet of colored paper, I would like each of you to define the word “Monster” for me. What does it mean? What makes a monster? We will read these definitions together and see if we can come up with some notes about what you guys think it means to be a monster… I’ll post them here!

Afterwards, we’re going to read an article called “What Makes a Monster” by Donald Fergus, in which the author tries to answer that very question. To read this article, we’re going to use the SQUEEPERS method. We’ve done this before, so maybe it’ll be familiar to some of you. But, if not, here’s the drill:

S=survey
-Preview the text
-Look at the pictures/captions
-Read highlighted/ bold words
-Read headings/subheadings
-Think about what you are about to read

Q=question
-Generate questions that we will be able to answer after we read (or look at questions on a test)

P=predict
-Predict 1 to 3 things we will learn while reading

R=read
Read:
-Alone
-With teacher
-With partner
-With a group

R=respond
-Discuss which questions were answered
-Review which questions weren’t answered
-Eliminate questions that aren’t likely to be answered
-Develop new questions
-Continue surveying process

S=summarize
Summarize what we have learned
Sounds relatively easy, right?

Next up, we’re going to read a poem called “Jabberwocky,” the same one that we saw the Muppets perform earlier! This poem is about a monster called the Jabberwock. We will go through each stanza together, and as we do, I would like you to write on your paper (below your article summary) what is going on. When we’re finished, we’ll see if we have a consensus on what Lewis Carroll is saying.

Closing Session

Finally, I would like you all to answer these three questions:

What is the mood or tone of the poem? What are three adjectives Lewis Carroll uses to set the scene?
Why is the Jabberwock dangerous? Why is it impressive that the boy killed the monster? List three words Lewis Carroll uses to tell you these things.
(this is the hard one) Look up all six of the words you used above and write down their definitions as the dictionary gives them to you.
When this is turned in, we’re done for the day! YAY!

Assessment

Graded Ticket Out The Door (Jabberwocky questions)
Monster definition / informal assessment of participation in discussion.

Differentiation

Students can use a variety of technologies to find definitions of the words in Jabberwocky, the article text can be differentiated to appeal to different reading levels, monster definitions are student-generated.

Monsters Are Out There!

Standards

L.9-10.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9—10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
L.9-10.4.a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
L.9-10.4.b Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).
L.9-10.4.d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
L.9-10.4.c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.
L.9-10.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

Activator

It’s MUPPET TIME!

 

Learning Target

Scholars will create their own definition of the word “monster,” examining what it means to be a monster, and look at the poem “Jabberwocky” to determine the meaning of words based on context, in addition to searching for their dictionary definitions.

Work Session

I hope you guys are psyched about our new unit, because I sure am! This is one of my favorite units so far, and I’m really excited to be teaching it to y’all. It’s all about….MONSTERS! I know, I know, I’m awesome, please hold your applause.

Anyway, today I would like to start out by asking YOU all a question! On a little sheet of colored paper, I would like each of you to define the word “Monster” for me. What does it mean? What makes a monster? We will read these definitions together and see if we can come up with some notes about what you guys think it means to be a monster… I’ll post them here!

Afterwards, we’re going to read an article called “What Makes a Monster” by Donald Fergus, in which the author tries to answer that very question. To read this article, we’re going to use the SQUEEPERS method. We’ve done this before, so maybe it’ll be familiar to some of you. But, if not, here’s the drill:

S=survey
-Preview the text
-Look at the pictures/captions
-Read highlighted/ bold words
-Read headings/subheadings
-Think about what you are about to read

Q=question
-Generate questions that we will be able to answer after we read (or look at questions on a test)

P=predict
-Predict 1 to 3 things we will learn while reading

R=read
Read:
-Alone
-With teacher
-With partner
-With a group

R=respond
-Discuss which questions were answered
-Review which questions weren’t answered
-Eliminate questions that aren’t likely to be answered
-Develop new questions
-Continue surveying process

S=summarize
Summarize what we have learned
Sounds relatively easy, right?

Next up, we’re going to read a poem called “Jabberwocky,” the same one that we saw the Muppets perform earlier! This poem is about a monster called the Jabberwock. We will go through each stanza together, and as we do, I would like you to write on your paper (below your article summary) what is going on. When we’re finished, we’ll see if we have a consensus on what Lewis Carroll is saying.

Closing Session

Finally, I would like you all to answer these three questions:

What is the mood or tone of the poem? What are three adjectives Lewis Carroll uses to set the scene?
Why is the Jabberwock dangerous? Why is it impressive that the boy killed the monster? List three words Lewis Carroll uses to tell you these things.
(this is the hard one) Look up all six of the words you used above and write down their definitions as the dictionary gives them to you.
When this is turned in, we’re done for the day! YAY!

Assessment

Graded Ticket Out The Door (Jabberwocky questions)
Monster definition / informal assessment of participation in discussion.

Differentiation

Students can use a variety of technologies to find definitions of the words in Jabberwocky, the article text can be differentiated to appeal to different reading levels, monster definitions are student-generated.