Tag Archive for summer reading

It’s FRIDAY!!! Ready to Think?

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

Learning Target: Students will receive the expectations for their summer reading assignment, and we will do a group “bomb shelter” activity to start the thought process for our first major writing assignment.

Daily Video: 

 

Happy Friday! Is everyone looking forward to the weekend?! I AM!!!! I’m going hiking up at Red Top Mountain, which is always fun 🙂

Your requirement for summer reading is simple: Read the book The Kite Runner and fill out a Google form with a few easy questions. It’s not hard, I promise. And when you’re done reading the book, there’s a movie, which is really good!! So it shouldn’t be too terribly hard for you to do.

The Woman Warrior

Funny in Farsi

Whichever you choose,  you gotta do this:

See? That’s not so bad, is it? And seriously, they’re both GOOD books! I won’t spoil it but I promise it’s a good story.

Next up, we’re going to get into groups of four (your tables) and do an activity designed to make you make some hard decisions.

Bomb Shelter Activity

Goal: Today we are going to see how people relate in difficult situations through a variety of activities.

Directions:

  1. A nuclear missile is headed toward Atlanta. Luckily, you are in the new gym during physical education, and can move into a bomb shelter hidden in the locker rooms under the old gym.
  2. This class is instructed to go to a bomb shelter where it has the capacity to hold the whole class and 8 other people.
  3. 13 people come to the shelter to be let The list is below. You must choose only 8 people to enter the bomb shelter. (That means 8 people will live and 5 will die).
  4. First, individually choose the 8 people would want to stay.
  5. The class is then divided into groups of 5-6 and they are asked to come to a consensus as to who gets to stay.( which means not just seeing who has the highest number of votes but to collectively agree on the person)
  6. You only have 25-30 minutes to come to a consensus as to who
  7. Finally, your group will present your findings to the class.

Here are the people who come to the door. Circle your personal choices:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Process questions:

  1. Which people were easy for you to select and please say what you valued about them?
  1. Which people did your group’s decision involved controversy over and why? How was the controversy resolved?
  1. What is the gender of the Tech cheerleader? Why?
  1. What qualities did you decide that certain people had that you chose them?
  1. State one conflict that you had with another member of the group:

Now, please circle your group’s final decision:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Reflection Questions:

  1. How are the two lists (your personal list and the final list) different?
  1. Were there any people that you felt strongly about that didn’t get on the final list? How did that feel?
  1. What did you value most in your decisions? Consensus (i.e. working with the group) or you sticking with your own decisions?
  1. How does understanding our own values help us with understanding how we want our life to be lived?
  1. How does understanding others values impact relationships individually and in groups?

 

Ticket out the Door

What did you learn about yourself from this activity based on who you would allow to live and who you would let die?

 

Assessment: Bomb shelter activity graded on completion, ticket out the door taken up

Differentiation: As students finish, an optional enrichment activity is offered/encouraged:

Enrichment Activity

Create your own bomb shelter scenario. You could use another kind of apocalypse like zombies taking over the world, or aliens taking over the surface of the world. Create a list of 13 candidates below.

  1. 7.
2. 8.
3. 9. 
4. 10.
5.   

 

 

lkl

 

11. 

 

6. 12.
13.

 

–OR–

 

Bomb shelters were popular in the fifties and sixties. Many exist today. Research bomb shelters. Find out five things about bomb shelter.

Assessment: Bomb shelter activities will be graded (formative).

Differentiation: Process – students will arrive at conclusions in different ways, students may or may not do the enrichment activities. Content – students will choose their own groups and debate with the peers they are most comfortable with.

 

Welcome to Thursday!

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Learning Target: Students will complete their mandala project in a creative and artistic way, as well as compose a paragraph explaining or justifying the symbols they have used to represent themselves.

Daily Video: 

Welcome to day 3! Today we are continuing with the mandalas we began yesterday. You should have composed your sun sentence and shadow sentence yesterday – remember, these sentences will go around the edges of your circle, forming a frame for your mandala. After your sentences are written in (I suggest using pencil) you can start to fill your mandala with symbols that represent yourself.

We’re going to spend the entire class working on these, and you guys are welcome to use any of the art supplies I have (markers, crayons, colored pencils…) so get to it!

When you finish, I want you to flip your mandala over to the back, write your name on it, and write a short paragraph (5-7 sentences) that explains your mandala. You will be sharing this with the class 🙂

Here’s some inspirational examples 🙂

sketch-finalicm-mandala2

sketch-finalicm-mandala1

sketch-finalicm-mandala4

sketch-finalicm-mandala3

(Source: http://www.rodrigonarciso.com.br/blog/human-nature-mandala-my-final-icm-project-sketch/)

As we finish up the mandalas, I want to revisit the summer reading information and go over the class syllabus 🙂

World Literature Course Syllabus: Fall 2016

Welcome to 10th Grade World Literature! This is a thematic-based course that covers literature from across the globe. Students will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the structural elements and critical evaluation of literature and will apply knowledge of literary terms to various works. Students will also show knowledge of strategies used to enhance understanding across subject areas, including content and contextual vocabulary. Additionally, students will show in-depth knowledge of grade-level research techniques and display a strong ability to interpret the message and effects of mass media. As well, students will show mastery of the writing process, including the usage and mechanics of Standard American English.

Units

We will complete five units over the course of the semester. Each unit will be based around a theme, rather than following a chronological curriculum. Students will be asked to complete a unit test for each unit. We will also complete several major writing assignments – an expository, a narrative, and an argumentative writing assignment at the minimum, with the possibility of other assignments added.

  • Unit 1: Animal Farm. Students will read Animal Farm by George Orwell and examine the Bolshevik Revolution and its aftermath. We will examine communism as it was in the Soviet Union and as it is in the world today.
  • Unit 2: Monsters are Out There! Students will read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, and examine the idea of a monster and what makes a monster. We will likely watch a movie during this unit. I will send a permission form home if this movie is rated any higher than PG.
  • Unit 3: Julius Caesar. Students will read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and examine the play from many different angles and perspectives.
  • Unit 4: Dante’s Inferno. Students will study a famous journey through the depths of Hell and human decency. They will examine The Inferno by Dante Alighieri and read other famous morality tales like Faust and Morality Play.
  • Unit 5: The Hero’s Journey. Students will read The Epic of Gilgamesh and examine the hero quest motif and hero archetype. They will complete several creative “make your own hero quest” projects and may watch a movie if time permits.

Textbook and Instructional Materials

Textbook: Prentice Hall World Literature

We do not have enough textbooks for students to check out their own copies. Students will have access to the textbook while in class. Because of this, I highly encourage students to purchase their own copies of the following works:

If your student owns a Kindle or other e-reader, a tablet, or a smartphone, all of these texts can be sent to your student’s device free of charge. I can also email electronic copies for reading at home. Just ask!

Additionally, students must have these materials in order to fully participate in class:

  • A binder (or section thereof) OR folder OR notebook. It must have pockets for class handouts AND paper which can be torn out and handed in (no composition books!)
  • Pen and #2 pencils
  • Although not required, donations of tissues, hand sanitizer, or paper towels are very much appreciated!

Grading Scale and Weights

A = 100-90           B = 89-80             C = 79-74             D = 73-70             F = 69 and below.

A standards-based grade book is used. My grade book will list assignments by title and standard. A student’s grades can be accessed online through Synergy.

Weights:              Reading and Literature Assessment:          30%

Writing and Conventions:                             30%

Listening, Speaking, and Viewing:               10%

Language and Vocabulary:                           10%

Final Exam:                                                      20%

Daily grades in the class are taken out of 10 points, and graded on a ✔, ✔, or ✔+. A ✔ is worth full credit, 10 points. A ✔ is worth 7 points. A ✔+ is worth 12 points, and allows the student to accumulate extra credit throughout the semester. If a student does not turn in an assignment, they will receive a 0.

Larger assignments, such as tests and essays, will be graded out of 100 points, making them worth much more than daily grades. Students will receive a rubric in class for each major assignment.  Art projects will generally be worth 50 points and are graded on completion and creativity.

Cobb County’s BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Policy

In accordance with Cobb County’s BYOD policy, students are encouraged to bring their own wireless and/or portable electronic hand-held electronic equipment to school (including iPads/iPods, Kindles, Nooks, laptop computer, Android tablets, smartphones, and so on). If a student would like to participate in the BYOD program, they must return a signed letter stating they understand the policies and responsibilities that come with the privilege of bringing their device to school. A copy of this letter will be made available to students, and can always be requested from the teacher.

Email Updates

Updates are provided on a daily basis at www.osborne10thlit.com. I will periodically (every three weeks or so) email all parents who provide an email address with an update on the class. Providing an email address is optional but highly encouraged.

Conduct and Participation

  • Active participation is required to excel in this course.
  • Appropriate language should be used in class. Academic English should be used on all formal writing assignments, whether typed or hand-written.
  • Be on time to class and ready to start when the bell rings. We will start every class with a video. If students are not on time or are not quiet and ready to start, I will discontinue the daily videos.
  • No passes will be issued during the first or last 15 minutes of class.
  • Passes will be issued to one student at a time – no exceptions!
  • Bring everything you need – assignments, pencils, paper, etc. – to class with you every day.
  • Late work: Students are not penalized for turning in work late; however, all work is due on Friday, December 9th. After that date, late work will not be accepted.
  • Cheating, plagiarism, or other violations of academic integrity will not be tolerated. A 0 will be given for the assignment and an administrative discipline referral will be issued.
  • Keep your hands and feet to yourself.
  • All school policies in the OHS Handbook are in force at all times.
  • Finally, treat people as you would like to be treated. Be courteous and respectful.

A graduated discipline policy includes a verbal warning, time out of class, detention, parent contact, parent conference, and administrative referral.

Assessment: Mandalas will be graded

Differentiation: Content: Student choice in their own symbols; Product: students may choose different media or approaches to the mandala assignment.

Surprise!

So, it turns out we got trumped for the lab today because there’s some testing going on. That’s OK!! We will make the best of it!

You guys will have until the end of class to finish writing your drafts by hand. You don’t need to be flawless in terms of grammar, spelling, etc., but it should be easy for me to read, since I need to interpret your handwriting! They are DUE at the end of class today!

But, BONUS! Because we are trapped here and I promised you some time to relax after your essays were done, today we’re going to turn on The Kite Runner while you write in class. This is the movie made from your summer reading book, so since I KNOW you all TOTALLY read the book, this will be a great refresher and you have no excuse to not do the summer reading. Which, by the way, you can complete right here:

Summer Reading 2015 – Sophomores

Enjoy, everyone!

Throwback Monday – Summer Reading?!

Welcome to MONDAY, everyone! I hope you had an awesome weekend and you’re all jazzed up to start the second week of spring semester!

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

Learning Target: Students will receive the expectations for their summer reading assignment, and we will do a group “bomb shelter” activity to start the thought process for our first major writing assignment.

Daily Video: 

Happy Monday! I hope you all had an awesome weekend 🙂 Today we are going to get into groups and do a little activity to get you thinking and making some hard decisions. But first! Let’s talk about SUMMER READING!!!

Yes, I know it is January.

Yes, I know that if you did summer reading, you did it six months ago.

No, you’re not off the hook because you didn’t have English until Spring.

Your requirement for summer reading is simple: Read the book The Kite Runner and fill out a Google form with a few easy questions. It’s not hard, I promise. And when you’re done reading the book, there’s a movie, which is really good!! So it shouldn’t be too terribly hard for you to do.

See? That’s not so bad, is it? And seriously, it’s a GOOD book! I won’t spoil it but I promise it’s a good story.

Next up, we’re going to get into groups of four (your tables) and do an activity designed to make you make some hard decisions.

Bomb Shelter Activity

Goal: Today we are going to see how people relate in difficult situations through a variety of activities.

Directions:

  1. A nuclear missile is headed toward Atlanta. Luckily, you are in the new gym during physical education, and can move into a bomb shelter hidden in the locker rooms under the old gym.
  2. This class is instructed to go to a bomb shelter where it has the capacity to hold the whole class and 8 other people.
  3. 13 people come to the shelter to be let The list is below. You must choose only 8 people to enter the bomb shelter. (That means 8 people will live and 5 will die).
  4. First, individually choose the 8 people would want to stay.
  5. The class is then divided into groups of 5-6 and they are asked to come to a consensus as to who gets to stay.( which means not just seeing who has the highest number of votes but to collectively agree on the person)
  6. You only have 25-30 minutes to come to a consensus as to who
  7. Finally, your group will present your findings to the class.

Here are the people who come to the door. Circle your personal choices:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions  
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
  13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Process questions:

  1. Which people were easy for you to select and please say what you valued about them?
  1. Which people did your group’s decision involved controversy over and why? How was the controversy resolved?
  1. What is the gender of the Tech cheerleader? Why?
  1. What qualities did you decide that certain people had that you chose them?
  1. State one conflict that you had with another member of the group:

Now, please circle your group’s final decision:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions  
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
  13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Reflection Questions:

  1. How are the two lists (your personal list and the final list) different?
  1. Were there any people that you felt strongly about that didn’t get on the final list? How did that feel?
  1. What did you value most in your decisions? Consensus (i.e. working with the group) or you sticking with your own decisions?
  1. How does understanding our own values help us with understanding how we want our life to be lived?
  1. How does understanding others values impact relationships individually and in groups?

 

Ticket out the Door

What did you learn about yourself from this activity based on who you would allow to live and who you would let die?

 

Assessment: Bomb shelter activity graded on completion, ticket out the door taken up

Differentiation: As students finish, an optional enrichment activity is offered/encouraged:

Enrichment Activity

Create your own bomb shelter scenario. You could use another kind of apocalypse like zombies taking over the world, or aliens taking over the surface of the world. Create a list of 13 candidates below.

  1. 7.
2. 8.
3. 9. 
4. 10.
5.  

 

 

 

lkl

 

11.

 

 

6. 12.
  13.

 

–OR–

 

Bomb shelters were popular in the fifties and sixties. Many exist today. Research bomb shelters. Find out five things about bomb shelters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’m Baaaaaack!

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will work on their summer reading and review their vocabulary words.

Activator: What will your verse be?

Howdy, everyone! Sorry I wasn’t here yesterday – had an appointment I couldn’t reschedule. What did everyone do with the sub yesterday? Did you all take good vocabulary notes?

Today I want to quickly review vocab in case some of you missed it from the sub. After that, we’ll be getting down to business with our summer reading. I’ve brought copies of all the books for summer reading, and I would like you guys to use this time to work on your summer reading assignments. If you’re not done with the book, you can use this time to read. While you guys are working, I’ll read an excerpt from each book to you guys so you can see what you’re missing on the other side 🙂