Tag Archive for taking a stand

World Lit: Taking a Stand on Legal Issues

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. 

Learning Target: I can analyze the use of rhetorical appeals in an argument and compare and contrast how different writers approach a subject or issue. 

Opening Session: Take a look at this banned commercial and tell me, do you think this is an appeal to ethos, pathos, or logos? 

Work Session: Today we’re going to be looking at different types of rhetorical appeals. This should mostly be review from what we did while talking about Antony’s “Friends, Romans, Countrymen” speech, but it’ll be some good practice at identifying which type of appeal is being used. While I was in a training class learning how to teach you guys using Springboard, my table of teachers actually disagreed on what kind of appeals were being used here – so you can see it’s not always clear-cut! 

We will be doing activity 2.14 in your book, starting on page 190. We’re going to read “On Surrender at Bear Paw Mountain, 1877” and “On Women’s Right to Vote”. These are two short texts that use different rhetorical appeals throughout. Afterwards, we will have a brief discussion on the different rhetorical appeals for review, and then I want you to do the “Writing to Sources: Explanatory Text” prompt on page 193. 

Closing Session: TOTD: which rhetorical appeal do you think is MOST effective on you personally? 

Assessment: Informal (Book check) 

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding) 

World Lit: Taking a Stand Against Childhood Hunger

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will understand the issue of childhood hunger and consider ways to address this crisis.
Opening Session
Check out this animated video from No Kid Hungry that summarizes the issue of childhood hunger in America:

Work Session
SPRINGBOARD BOOKS!!!

Grab your Springboards and flip to page 194. We’re going to be reading about some social issues over the next couple days because within a couple weeks you guys will be turning in the second part of your sophomore capstone, the Social Issue essay.

As a reminder, this essay is the one that you will write about a specific social issue that affects your culture (which you wrote about in the last capstone essay, the Cultural Identity essay). You’ll research the issue, explain what it is, and then explain how it affects your culture. For example, if your cultural identity essay was about being an African American girl, you might write about the epidemic of low birth weight babies among black mothers in America. If you wrote about being a gamer, you might write about sexism in the gaming world. If you wrote about otaku culture, you might write about gatekeeping and elitism in the otaku community.

Anyway, today we are going to be completing activity 2.15 in Springboard. We will be reading a UN proclamation and an article about childhood hunger, then answering the Second Read questions and discussing childhood hunger, the worldwide statistics, and how we can work towards solving the problem together.

Closing Session
Think-Pair-Share: Talk to your partner and brainstorm for a few minutes about something you could do to address the issue of childhood hunger. Let’s share some ideas with the class!

Assessment
Formative (book check of Second Read questions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolded questions)

World Lit: Taking a Stand Against Exploitation

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze an argumentative essay and begin brainstorming for their own social issue essay.

Opening Session

VOCAB WORDS!

1. Domestic
2. Posterity
3. Disenfranchisement
4. Ex Post Facto
5. Dissension
6. Compensating
7. Subsidies
8. Stigma
9. Snafu
10. Pilfer

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading the editorial “Diners should pay attention to workers, not just the food” on page 210 of your textbook. We will read aloud together as a class, then do the Second Read questions 1-4 on page 212 together as a class discussion.

Afterwards, I want to look at some essay construction techniques. Do the Working from the Text activity on page 213, where you disassemble the essay you just read into an outline. The idea here is to really examine how an author organizes their thoughts, so that when YOU do your Social Issue essay, you will not have a difficult time setting it up and organizing it.

Closing Session
Since we’ll be doing the Social Issue Essay this week, I’m going to come around and ask each of you what your chosen Social Issue will be. While I’m talking to everyone, you can go ahead and get out a sheet of paper and start brainstorming/outlining for your essay. We will be writing it tomorrow, Wednesday, and Friday (when it’s due!!).

Assessment
Formative (class discussion, topic checks); Summative (essay due Friday)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, outlining, graphic organizers), Interest (topic choice)

World Lit: Taking A Stand Against Exploitation

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. 

Learning target: I can read an argument and analyze how the author builds it, and I can write an essay that explains how an author builds an argument to persuade an audience. 

Opening Session: VOCAB WORDS!

  1. Domestic
  2. Posterity
  3. Disenfranchisement
  4. Ex Post Facto
  5. Dissension
  6. Compensating
  7. Subsidies
  8. Stigma
  9. Snafu
  10. Pilfer

Work Session:

Today we’re going to be reading the editorial “Diners should pay attention to workers, not just the food” on page 210 of your textbook. We will read aloud together as a class, then do the Second Read questions 1-4 on page 212 together as a class discussion

Afterwards, I want to look at some essay construction techniques. Do the Working from the Text activity on page 213, where you disassemble the essay you just read into an outline. The idea here is to really examine how an author organizes their thoughts, so that when YOU do your Counterargument Assignment tomorrow, you will have some good ideas of how to set it up. 

Closing Session: We formally unpacked the Counterargument Assignment last week, but today I want to confirm everyone’s topic and answer any questions. That way, when you get here tomorrow, we can just get right in to working!

Assessment: Informal (book check) 

Differentiation: Process (flexible groups) 

World Lit: Taking a Stand Against Hunger, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. 

Learning Target: I can identify an author’s purpose and analyze an argument presented, and I can synthesize information from print and nonprint persuasive texts. 

Opening Session: Check out this animated video from No Kid Hungry about childhood hunger: 

Work Session: Let’s continue our discussion from yesterday about childhood hunger. Today you’re going to read an essay that is supposed to convince you to take action against childhood hunger in America. This is on page 199 in your Springboard – “School’s Out for Summer”. 

After we read, I want you to work on the Second Read questions, and then we will have a brief class discussion on whether or not the author convinced you to take action, and if so, what will you do? 

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ and BOOK CHECK! 

Assessment: Informal (class discussion); Formal (vocab quiz) 

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)