Tag Archive for the Simpsons

AP Lang: Humor Week, Day 3

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text.

Learning Target: I can analyze how an author uses rhetoric to create humor in an essay.

Opening Session: Satire ala The Simpsons!

Work Session: Today we’re going to be examining a pretty famous text called “A Modest Proposal.” We’re going to listen to an audio recording of the entire essay, which will take about 30 minutes, and then have a little discussion over it.

  • Why would Swift suggest something as outrageous as eating babies?
  • What was actually the problem? Was it hunger? Was it the Irish?
  • What would have been a more reasonable solution?
  • How do you think the public reacted when the essay was published?

After a little discussion, I want you guys to take a stab at your own sort of satire. I would like for you to write your own “modest proposal”. Remember the things that defined the original – your idea needs to be absolutely ludicrous, the problem you’re solving should be something that people perceive as real, but your solution needs to be so outlandish as to make it obvious that it’s not really a problem in the first place. For example, Jonathan Swift saw that other people thought there were “too many Irish,” so he proposed the idea of eating Irish children, which is so ridiculous that it makes it obvious that there is really no problem in the first place. This will be a journal entry, so I’m only looking for 1-2 paragraphs, nothing huge.

Closing Session: Share out! I would love to hear what you’ve written!

Assessment: Formative – Friday Journal Check

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Independent Reading book

Career Aptitude Normalizing Tuesday

It’s my daughter’s birthday today! She’s three years old!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10SL6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grades 9–10 Language Standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Learning Target: I will take use technology to play “brain games” that will help me determine my aptitudes and what careers might interest me.

Opening Session: A little satire, courtesy of The Simpsons!

Work Session: Everyone grab a laptop and continue where you left off yesterday! You should finish the test today – when you get done, if you have time, you can take the optional assessments as well. I’m so excited to see your results!!

The first half of the test will take the first half of class. After you finish, you should continue working on your Metamorphosis essay that we started last Friday. That essay will be due today at the end of class after you finish the second half of the YouScience test.

Closing Session: Check your laptops back in with me and make sure they’re back on the cart!

Differentiation: YouScience exam is self-differentiating; essay may be modified (process, product).

Assessment: YouScience is self-graded; essays will be a major grade.

The Price of a Monday

Standard: RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Learning Target: Students will read and understand The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus and Faust, and consider the similarities and differences in the two interpretations.

Activator: Bart Sells His Soul

So, today we’re learning about a niftyfun play called Dr. Faustus. It’s about a guy who sells his soul to the devil. No, seriously, it is! And after reading Dante’s Inferno, I bet you all can guess that that’s not really such a good idea.

We’re going to start out the day with a Dr. Faustus spoof from The Simpsons, an episode in which Bart sells his soul to Millhouse for 5 bucks. Again with the not so much a good idea, right?

After we watch The Simpsons, we’re going to read Faust from our textbook on page 851. I want you guys to partner up, choose one partner to be Faust and one to be Mephistopheles, and read the play aloud to each other. When you finish, you’ll flip to page 867, keep your same parts and readThe Tragical History of Dr. Faustus. When you’ve finished with both, I would like you to write a summary for me.

  • Write one paragraph that summarizes what happens in the two plays.
  • Write one paragraph that lists the similarities and differences in the two versions you read. You can consider such things as language, characters, plot, and so forth.
  • Hand your summary into me when you’re done, and yes, you will be graded!

Tomorrow, we’ll start working on our essay. Yay!

The Price of a Soul

Standard: RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Learning Target: Students will read and understand The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus and Faust, and consider the similarities and differences in the two interpretations.

Activator: Bart Sells His Soul

So, today we’re learning about a niftyfun play called Dr. Faustus. It’s about a guy who sells his soul to the devil. No, seriously, it is! And after reading Dante’s Inferno, I bet you all can guess that that’s not really such a good idea.

We’re going to start out the day with a Dr. Faustus spoof from The Simpsons, an episode in which Bart sells his soul to Millhouse for 5 bucks. Again with the not so much a good idea, right?

After we watch The Simpsons, we’re going to read Faust from our textbook on page 851. I want you guys to partner up, choose one partner to be Faust and one to be Mephistopheles, and read the play aloud to each other. When you finish, you’ll flip to page 867, keep your same parts and readThe Tragical History of Dr. Faustus. When you’ve finished with both, I would like you to write a summary for me.

  • Write one paragraph that summarizes what happens in the two plays.
  • Write one paragraph that lists the similarities and differences in the two versions you read. You can consider such things as language, characters, plot, and so forth.
  • Hand your summary into me when you’re done, and yes, you will be graded!

Tomorrow we’re going to be working on an art project and finishing Dante’s Inferno from our textbook! :)

If we have time, we’ll end the day with The House of the Scorpion, so if you want to hear more in our novel, you should read and work hard all day!

The Price of a Soul

Welcome to Tuesday!

Standard: RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Learning Target: Students will read and understand The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus and Faust, and consider the similarities and differences in the two interpretations.

Activator: Bart Sells His Soul

So, today we’re learning about a niftyfun play called Dr. Faustus. It’s about a guy who sells his soul to the devil. No, seriously, it is! And after reading Dante’s Inferno, I bet you all can guess that that’s not really such a good idea.

We’re going to start out the day with a Dr. Faustus spoof from The Simpsons, an episode in which Bart sells his soul to Millhouse for 5 bucks. Again with the not so much a good idea, right?

After we watch The Simpsons, we’re going to read Faust from our textbook on page 851. I want you guys to partner up, choose one partner to be Faust and one to be Mephistopheles, and read the play aloud to each other. When you finish, you’ll flip to page 867, keep your same parts and readThe Tragical History of Dr. Faustus. When you’ve finished with both, I would like you to write a summary for me.

  • Write one paragraph that summarizes what happens in the two plays.
  • Write one paragraph that lists the similarities and differences in the two versions you read. You can consider such things as language, characters, plot, and so forth.
  • Hand your summary into me when you’re done, and yes, you will be graded!

Tomorrow we’re going to be working on an art project, and we’ll be in the computer lab on Thursday to work on our Big Project for this unit! I can’t wait to share it with you, because this one is fun 🙂

If we have time, we’ll end the day with The House of the Scorpion, so if you want to hear more in our novel, you should read and work hard all day!