Tag Archive for value line

Magical Realism

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can examine the genre and themes of The Alchemist by participating in a class discussion so that I can gain a deeper understanding of the text.

Opening Session
Magical Realism
Magical_Realism_Power_Point

Work Session
Alchemist Value Line (yes/no/maybe) class discussion (students must defend their position on the value line)

The Alchemist Value Line questions

Vocab!!

  1. Alchemist
  2. sacristy
  3. pasture
  4. zenith
  5. seminary
  6. omen
  7. Philosopher’s Stone
  8. caravan
  9. primitive
  10. levanter

 

Closing Session

Now that we have some background information, it’s time to start the book! Read The Alchemist to the star on page 21 🙂

Assessment
Formative (class discussion, notes, value line)

Differentiation
Learning style (kinesthetic, visual)

American Lit: The Bill Of Rights

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preabmle to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

Learning Target: I can compare how a common theme is expressed in different foundational historical documents of the United States.

Opening Session: Schoolhouse Rock – The Preamble

Work Session: Look around the room – you’ll notice little signs. Go to the sign that you think is MOST IMPORTANT! They say:

  • Freedom of Religion
  • Freedom of Speech
  • Right to Bear Arms
  • Freedom from illegal search and seizures,
  • Right to Jury Trial
  • Right to not have cruel and unusual punishment
  • Not having to share your house with soldiers when you’re not in a war

After you’re there, we can see what the class as a whole thinks – and we can defend our positions, if you want!

Let’s head back to our own desks and read the Preamble to the Constitution and Bill of Rights. Then, I have some discussion questions for you!

  • Should there be limitations on freedom of speech?
  • Which of these freedoms are taken away the most by authorities?
  • To what extent are we as individuals responsible to ensure that everyone has these freedoms?
  • If you had to take one of the amendments out of the Bill of Rights, which would you remove? What would you replace it with? Why?

Closing Session: Go back to the signs around the room. Based on our discussions, has anyone moved to a different spot? If so, why?

Assessment: Informal – class discussions

Differentiation: Interest (students can move around the room and choose their own topics to debate)

Welcome to Caesar!

Standards

RI.9-10.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Activator

Learning Target

Scholars will learn historical context for Julius Caesar, and participate in a value line to determine how they feel about different moral issues.

Work Session

Welcome to Monday! We’re going to start out today with a little PowerPoint introduction to the story we’re about to read, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar:

Introduction to Julius Caesar

After that, we’re going to do a little value line activity. This is the one where we have “Agree” and “Disagree” on the walls, and you go stand where your opinion lies. Here are the statements we will be working with today:

  • It is never OK to kill another human being.
  • Sometimes, the good of many outweighs the good of one.
  • People always want more power for themselves.
  • The worst thing someone can do is to betray a friend.
  • You should listen to your gut instinct instead of the advice of others.
  • Arrogance will be the downfall of the greatest leaders.
  • The best leaders are loved by the general public.
  • A small group of powerful men should be able to decide the fate of a nation.
  • Sometimes you have to go to extremes to make your point.
  • Doing something wrong and admitting it is an honorable thing to do.

Closing Session

Write a paragraph – did you ever feel like you should change sides during our discussion and if so, why? If not, why not?

Assessment

Paragraphs will be graded

Differentiation

Kinesthetic learning styles with value line, visual/auditory with discussion

Welcome to Caesar!

Standard: SL.9-10.1. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Learning Target: Students will learn historical context for Julius Caesar, and participate in a value line to determine how they feel about different moral issues.

Activator: Video SparkNotes: Julius Caesar Summary

Welcome to Monday! We’re going to start out today with a little PowerPoint introduction to the story we’re about to read, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar:

Introduction to Julius Caesar

After that, we’re going to do a little value line activity. This is the one where we have “Agree” and “Disagree” on the walls, and you go stand where your opinion lies. Here are the statements we will be working with today:

  1. It is never OK to kill another human being.
  2. Sometimes, the good of many outweighs the good of one.
  3. People always want more power for themselves.
  4. The worst thing someone can do is to betray a friend.
  5. You should listen to your gut instinct instead of the advice of others.
  6. Arrogance will be the downfall of the greatest leaders.
  7. The best leaders are loved by the general public.
  8. A small group of powerful men should be able to decide the fate of a nation.
  9. Sometimes you have to go to extremes to make your point.
  10. Doing something wrong and admitting it is an honorable thing to do.

Abandon Every Hope…

Standard: RL.9-10.2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: Students will read the first half of Dante’s Inferno from the textbook, and examine their ideas of ethics and morals on a value line.

Activator: Dante’s Inferno Trailer

Today we’re going to kick it off by watching that really cool trailer up there, and THEN….we get to take notes :(

Oh, shut up. Sometimes I have to tell you stuff before I can teach you other stuff. It’s like in an introductory paragraph where you tell me what you’re going to tell me. So I guess I could start out my notes by saying “In this unit I will tell you…”

…except we don’t use phrases like that, do we? HAH!

Anyway, we’re going to take some notes over ethical paradigms. Do we know what a paradigm is? 

par·a·digm/ˈparəˌdīm/

Noun:
  1. A typical example or pattern of something; a model.
  2. A worldview underlying the theories and methodology of a particular scientific subject.

In our case, we’re talking about the second one – the worldview bit. I’m going to teach you about four ethical dilemmas – we all know the difference in right and wrong, but what if our options are right and right?

And to illustrate the point, we’re going to play with a value line! That means standing up and moving across the room :)

That’s today, guys! Everyone enjoy!