Tag Archive for vocab

Magical Realism

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can examine the genre and themes of The Alchemist by participating in a class discussion so that I can gain a deeper understanding of the text.

Opening Session
Magical Realism
Magical_Realism_Power_Point

Work Session
Alchemist Value Line (yes/no/maybe) class discussion (students must defend their position on the value line)

The Alchemist Value Line questions

Vocab!!

  1. Alchemist
  2. sacristy
  3. pasture
  4. zenith
  5. seminary
  6. omen
  7. Philosopher’s Stone
  8. caravan
  9. primitive
  10. levanter

 

Closing Session

Now that we have some background information, it’s time to start the book! Read The Alchemist to the star on page 21 🙂

Assessment
Formative (class discussion, notes, value line)

Differentiation
Learning style (kinesthetic, visual)

AP Lit: Battle Royale

Standards

  • RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Common Core State Standards English
  • RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Common Core State Standards English
  • RL.11-12.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.) Common Core State Standards English
  • RI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Common Core State Standards English

Objective
Scholars will be able to identify symbols and understand their  meaning in an extended text.

Warm Up
Grammar, Voice, and Independent Reading

Activator
Vocab quiz

New Vocab for the week:

  • metonymy
  • synecdoche
  • hyperbole
  • imagery
  • symbol

Work Session

In groups of 3 read “Battle Royale” from Invisible Man in textbook, p. 285.

In those groups, complete one of the essays (Teacher choice per group): 1, 3, 5, or 8.

Teacher is circulating, helping direct essays.

Closing Session
Discuss some of the answers from the essays.

Assessment Strategies
Thumbs up thumbs down, weather the students are able to understand how the battle royal is a symbol of white society keeping black people fighting each other.

American Lit: CTLS Monday!

Standard: 

ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can demonstrate my progress on an CTLS Assessment.

Opening Session: Vocab!

  1. Dominion
  2. Immoderate
  3. Wrath
  4. Appease
  5. Indictment
  6. Deposed
  7. Afflicted
  8. Lanced

Work Session: We will spend the entire Work Session today working on your CTLS assessment on the laptops!

Closing Session: Make any final edits to your essay from last week and get it attached to OneNote so I can grade them! I MUST have them by today so I can print and bring them to my meeting on Wednesday 🙂

Assessment: Formative (CTLS)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

World Lit: I Remember…

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a narrative about my childhood that begins to show my cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session: Sounds every 2010s kid will remember…do y’all know these? Because I feel so old right now

Work Session: Get out the memory maps we did last week and take a few minutes to read through what you wrote. Then, share your map with a friend and chat about the memories you wrote down, which ones are most important, and which ones you might have forgotten until just now. We’re going to use this map to do your first draft of our cultural identity essay!

After everyone has a chance to chat, I want you to sit down and write a journal entry for me. Take about ten or fifteen minutes and write 4ish paragraphs, using this format:

I remember…

I remember…

I remember…

But mostly I remember…

Your end piece might diverge from that, but let’s start there. Fifteen minutes to write. Go!

When time is up, take a minute to grab a laptop and let’s log into OneNote and look at how this works! I am super excited for our class notebook 🙂

After a short OneNote lesson, go back to the journal entry you just wrote. Open up Microsoft Word. Take that brain-dump-journal-entry and use it as your jumping off point for your narrative essay about your cultural identity. Here is the full essay prompt:

Your assignment is to write a narrative essay of about 750 words explaining your cultural identity through a story. You should compose a thoughtful piece that shows your reader your cultural identity, rather than simply talking about it. Your paper should be typed in MLA format and uploaded to our class OneNote Notebook by the end of class on Friday, January 18th.

You will have the rest of class to work on your first draft of your paper. Tomorrow, we workshop!

Closing Session: VOCAB!!! Take ten minutes to copy these down and get their definitions. QUIZ ON FRIDAY!

  1. indignity
  2. reproach
  3. listlessly
  4. bellows
  5. mesmerizing
  6. trills
  7. arpeggio
  8. reverie
  9. fiasco
  10. nonchalantly

Assessment: Summative (cultural identity embedded assessment); formative (journal checks, discussion)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), product (varied essay length or prompt)

World Lit: Author’s Stylebook: Pacing

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can analyze the narrative technique writers use to create a sense of pacing in a narrative and apply pacing to my own writing.

Opening Session: Grab the narrative you wrote yesterday- you’re going to use it again today! Take ten minutes to read over it and remember what you wrote 🙂

Work Session: Today we’re going to read a story called “Pick One” by David Matthews and consider the issue of pacing in writing. You know how some TV shows or movies are really fast-paced, and others seem to drag? It’s the same in writing. The series I’ve been reading during Independent Reading time, The Demon Cycle, is generally lauded for being really fast-paced and action packed. By contrast, another favorite book of mine, The Name of the Wind, is very slow-paced. I can read you example passages of each that demonstrate this 🙂 As we read our short story today, listen for shifts in the pacing and how the author achieved that.

After we read, go back to the narrative you wrote yesterday. How did you pace your writing? Fast, slow, or otherwise? Did you do it intentionally?

Consider what we’ve read today, then let’s do the Sentence Variety box on page 132, and then look to page 134, and use your own writing to find different types of sentences. You can work with your story to include a variety of sentence structures, which will make your writing stronger.

Closing Session: Share your sentences!

Assessment: Informal – book check, vocab quiz

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Product (varied lengths)