Tag Archive for greek hero story

Greek Mythology: The Iliad Day 2

Goals for the Week:

  1. Understand the mythology of the Trojan War.
  2. Understand the plot and characters of Homer’s Iliad.
  3. Complete the Iliad Character Research Prompt.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Understand the plot of Homer’s Iliad
  2. Consider what’s history and what’s mythology
  3. Begin to grapple with the language of Homer

Your assignment for this week!

This week you will:

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: 

I can understand a broad overview of The Iliad by reading summaries of the text so that I can look more in-depth at the most important parts of the text.

Activator: 

Let’s start today by talking about history!

So, whenever I teach The Iliad, the first question my students as is “Did this really happen?” and the answer is….well…maybe kinda?

It depends on what you’re asking.

  • Did a guy named Achilles really exist? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • Did the city of Troy really exist? yes!
  • Was there a Trojan War like Homer described it? There was probably a war, but we don’t know if it was like Homer described.
  • Was there a Trojan Horse? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

We have a lot more questions than answers. But one thing we do know is where Troy is supposed to have been:

For more info on what’s history and what’s mythology, read this article, “The Fall of Troy: The Legend and The Facts”. And you can check out this short TedEd video on the archaeological pursuits to find Troy!

Work Session: 

The goal today is for you to get a basic understanding of the plot of The Iliad. To do that, I’m going to give you a few resources to look into. Choose one to read. The others? Give them a cursory glance. Skim them. At least look at the pictures.

Closing Session:

Let’s sum up what happens in The Iliad with a video, shall we? Check out this rendition from CLEAN Classics Summarized on YouTube!

PS – we will have a ZOOM MEETING on Thursday at 11am! This is optional, but we are looking forward to seeing your smiling face on the camera, so please try to come!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

  1. Understand Hector’s death in The Iliad
  2. Consider various interpretations of Hector’s death scene in various media.
  3. Prepare for Thursday’s Zoom meeting!

World Lit: Greek Hero Story DUE!!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: MLA Format recap!

Work Session: 

YOUR STORY IS DUE TODAY!!!!!

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

TURN IT IN!!!

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

World Lit: Greek Hero Story!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: Share out! Who did you decide to write about and what did you think was particularly cool about that person?

Work Session: 

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

World Lit: Greek Hero Research!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!

Work Session: 

We’re going to start a new essay today! This one should be pretty fun, I hope. I want you to grab a laptop and do some research one a character from the Trojan War, then write me a story about that character’s adventures during the war. I’ve listed several for you to choose from. Although your story should be fictional, you should base on research about that character – for example, Cassandra has prophetic visions that no one believes are true (but in fact they are 100% accurate). If you write about Cassandra, you should include her gift of prophesy and her curse that no one believes her.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)