Tag Archive for Mandala

Mandalas!

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.5. Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.

Learning Target: Students will complete their mandala project in a creative and artistic way, as well as compose a paragraph explaining or justifying the symbols they have used to represent themselves.

Daily Video: 

Welcome to day 3! Today we are continuing with the mandalas we began yesterday. You should have composed your sun sentence and shadow sentence yesterday – remember, these sentences will go around the edges of your circle, forming a frame for your mandala. After your sentences are written in (I suggest using pencil) you can start to fill your mandala with symbols that represent yourself.

We’re going to spend the entire class working on these, and you guys are welcome to use any of the art supplies I have (markers, crayons, colored pencils…) so get to it!

When you finish, I want you to flip your mandala over to the back, write your name on it, and write a short paragraph (5-7 sentences) that explains your mandala. You will be sharing this with the class 🙂

Here’s some inspirational examples 🙂

sketch-finalicm-mandala2

sketch-finalicm-mandala1

sketch-finalicm-mandala4

sketch-finalicm-mandala3

(Source: http://www.rodrigonarciso.com.br/blog/human-nature-mandala-my-final-icm-project-sketch/)

Assessment: Mandalas will be graded

Differentiation: Content: Student choice in their own symbols; Product: students may choose different media or approaches to the mandala assignment.

Let me introduce you to day 2…

Good morning everyone! Welcome to day 2!

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.2. Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source.

Learning Target: Students will finish composing their letters of introduction and then begin working on their mandala art project.

Daily Video:

Hi everyone! Welcome back to day 2. Is anyone else as sleepy as I am? Seriously, I had to roll down my window on the drive in to stay awake this morning. Sheesh! Hopefully this coffee kicks in soon so we can have a productive day together!

Our first order of business today is to finish our letters of introduction. Here are the directions, if you missed them yesterday or would like to download and save a copy: Letter of Introduction Directions. (There are two copies of the directions on the page; I am big on saving paper so I will almost always print more than one assignment per sheet.) You’ll have about 15-20 minutes to finish the intro letter, depending on how much  time is actually needed, and then we will move on to our first creative assignment, the mandala.

This project is called the “Sun/Shadow” mandala. The idea is to create a circle filled with symbols that represent you as a person, framed by a sentence that summarizes those things. This is a great chance for you to be creative and artistic! And don’t worry if you’re not Rembrandt; I understand that not everyone is an artist and your grade is only based on your effort, creativity, and completion, NOT your artistic skill.

Need some visual examples of a mandala before we get started? OK! Here’s a powerpoint filled with them, and we’ll look at it together in class: Mandala Examples!

And now, directions!

SUN-SHADOW MANDALA PROJECT

Directions: Mandalas are one of the oldest art forms known to humanity. They are one of the oldest symbols in the world and one of the few universal ones. Translated from Sanskrit, mandala means circle – a symbol of completeness – the most perfect medium in which to present a picture of yourself. One type of mandala is called the sun-shadow mandala, and it represents, in part, the contrasts between one’s sun qualities – what is visible and projected – and the shadow qualities – what is interior and inward. I. The first step in making a mandala is writing two sets of answers to the questions below. One set represents the sun answers; the other set represents the shadow answers:

Sun-Images: How do you appear on the surface to the world? This is the part of you that is seen or projected to others.

1. What animal are you most like?

2. What plant are you most like?

3. What color are you most like?

4. What shape are you most like?

5. What number are you most like?

6. What mineral or gem are you most like?

7. What natural element are you most like?

Shadow-Images: The part of you that is not shown. The shadow images can be considered the direct opposites to the sun images.

1. What animal are you most unlike?

2. What plant are you most unlike?

3. What color are you most unlike?

4. What shape are you most unlike?

5. What number are you most unlike?

6. What mineral or gem are you most unlike?

7. What natural element are you most unlike?

Remember:

Sun Image – what is visible and projected (what is seen)

Shadow Image – what is interior and inward (what is hidden; the opposite of the sun image)

 

Once the questions are complete, the next step is to write a sentence for each of your symbols. The most important part of your sentence is the “why” part. Through your sentences you will share why you feel a certain symbol represents you. In the end you will have a total of 14 sentences. Here are some examples:

Sun Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (sun image), because like the (sun image), I __________________________________.

Ex: I am like poison oak, because like poison oak, I’m harmless until stepped on.

Shadow Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (shadow image), because like the (shadow image), I ___________________________.

Ex: I am like a Venus flytrap, because like a Venus flytrap, I want to capture you and make you a part of me.

 

The next step is to write a single sentence containing all of your sun signs; and, a single sentence containing all of your shadow signs. This requires you to get creative. Consider it word play. You may add words necessary to complete your sentence. You will write both of these sentences around the outside perimeter of your mandala.

Sun Sentence: The playful kitten jumped up into the spider plant to stare up at the sky blue heavens with round, amethyst eyes before pouncing back to earth, scratching his claws in the dirt seven times.

Shadow Sentence: The fierce lion roared in agony as he stumbled into a diamond shaped thorn bush, his eyes black with rage and his breath as hot as fire, as his square jaw picked out thirteen painful needles.

 

Once you have your sun and shadow sentences written, I will give you a template to trace a circle and begin working on your mandala. You should incorporate all of your sun and shadow symbols into your mandala.

We will work on this all day in class, and we will have all day tomorrow for coloring your mandalas in. Enjoy, everyone!

Syllabus Friday!

Standard: RL.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Learning Target: Students will finish their mandala, take a learning styles inventory on iRespond, and we will go over the syllabus and class expectations.

Activator: Weird Al – Word Crimes

World Literature Course Syllabus: Spring 2015

 

Welcome to 10th Grade World Literature! This is a thematic-based course that covers literature from across the globe. Students will demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the structural elements and critical evaluation of literature and will apply knowledge of literary terms to various works. Students will also show knowledge of strategies used to enhance understanding across subject areas, including content and contextual vocabulary. Additionally, students will show in-depth knowledge of grade-level research techniques and display a strong ability to interpret the message and effects of mass media. As well, students will show mastery of the writing process, including the usage and mechanics of Standard American English.

 

Units

We will complete four units over the course of the semester. Each unit will be based around a theme, rather than following a chronological curriculum. Students will be asked to complete a unit test for each unit. We will also complete several major writing assignments – an expository, a narrative, and an argumentative writing assignment at the minimum, with the possibility of other assignments added.

  • Unit 1: The Hero’s Journey. Students will study the hero archetype and the hero’s journey story type, reading The Epic of Gilgamesh, as well as other shorter stories or excerpts from around the world.
  • Unit 2: Animal Farm. Students will read Animal Farm by George Orwell and examine the Bolshevik Revolution and its aftermath. We will examine communism as it was in the Soviet Union and as it is in the world today.
  • Unit 3: Julius Caesar. Students will read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and examine the play from many different angles and perspectives.
  • Unit 3: Monsters are Out There! Students will read The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka, and examine the idea of a monster and what makes a monster. We will likely watch a movie during this unit. I will send a permission form home if this movie is rated any higher than PG.
  • Unit 5: To Be Decided. More information will be forthcoming about our final unit.

 

Textbook and Instructional Materials

 

Textbook: Prentice Hall World Literature

 

We do not have enough textbooks for students to check out their own copies. Students will have access to the textbook while in class. Because of this,  I highly encourage students to purchase their own copies of the following works:

If your student owns a Kindle or other e-reader, a tablet, or a smartphone, both these texts can be sent to your student’s device free of charge. I can also email electronic copies for reading at home. Just ask!

 

Additionally, students must have these materials in order to fully participate in class:

  • A binder (or section thereof) OR folder OR notebook. It must have pockets for class handouts AND paper which can be torn out and handed in (no composition books!)
  • Pen and #2 pencils
  • Although not required, donations of tissues, hand sanitizer, or paper towels are very much appreciated!

 

Grading Scale and Weights

A = 100-90           B = 89-80              C = 79-74              D = 73-70              F = 69 and below.

A standards-based grade book is used. My grade book will list assignments by title and standard. A student’s grades can be accessed online through Synergy.

Weights:              Reading and Literature Assessment:      30%

Writing and Conventions:                            30%

Listening, Speaking, and Viewing:           10%

Language and Vocabulary:                           10%

Final Exam:                                                         20%

 

Daily grades in the class are taken out of 10 points, and graded on a ü, ü-, or ü+. A ü is worth full credit, 10 points. A ü- is worth 7 points. A ü+ is worth 12 points, and allows the student to accumulate extra credit throughout the semester. If a student does not turn in an assignment, they will receive a 0.

 

Larger assignments, such as tests and essays, will be graded out of 100 points, making them worth much more than daily grades. Students will receive a rubric in class for each major assignment.  Art projects will generally be worth 50 points and are graded on completion and creativity.

 

Cobb County’s BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Policy

In accordance with Cobb County’s BYOD policy, students are encouraged to bring their own wireless and/or portable electronic hand-held electronic equipment to school (including iPads/iPods, Kindles, Nooks, laptop computer, Android tablets, smartphones, and so on). If a student would like to participate in the BYOD program, they must return a signed letter stating they understand the policies and responsibilities that come with the privilege of bringing their device to school. A copy of this letter will be made available to students, and can always be requested from the teacher.

 

Email Updates

Updates are provided on a daily basis at www.osborne10thlit.com. I will periodically (every three weeks or so) email all parents who provide an email address with an update on the class. Providing an email address is optional but highly encouraged.

 

Conduct and Participation

  • Active participation is required to excel in this course.
  • Appropriate language should be used in class. Academic English should be used on all formal writing assignments, whether typed or hand-written.
  • Be on time to class and ready to start when the bell rings. We will start every class with a video. If students are not on time or are not quiet and ready to start, I will discontinue the daily videos.
  • No passes will be issued during the first or last 10 minutes of class.
  • Passes will be issued to one student at a time – no exceptions!
  • Bring everything you need – assignments, pencils, paper, etc. – to class with you every day.
  • Late work: Students are not penalized for turning in work late; however, all work is due on Monday, May 12th. After May 12th, late work will not be accepted.
  • Cheating, plagiarism, or other violations of academic integrity will not be tolerated. A 0 will be given for the assignment and an administrative discipline referral will be issued.
  • Keep your hands and feet to yourself.
  • All school policies in the OHS Handbook are in force at all times.
  • Finally, treat people as you would like to be treated. Be courteous and respectful.

 

A graduated discipline policy includes a verbal warning, time out of class, detention, parent contact, parent conference, and administrative referral.

 

Color your Thursday!

Standard: RL.9-10.3. Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

Learning Target: Students will continue working on their mandala project. Students who finish early will write a descriptive paragraph about their mandala, and potentially move on to writing a Li Bo inspired poem.

Activator: Daily video! I love sitcoms, and this scene from Friends makes me giggle every time I watch it: Joey and his thesaurus

Today in class we continued working on our mandalas . What’s that? You want some inspirational bullet points? Well OK then!

  • You might color using more than one medium, meaning you might use markers and crayons, or colored pencils and sharpie, or something like that.
  • Consider using only one color, but shading it in with different strengths (so your mandala might range from pink to red, for example…)
  • Use only a pencil and make the whole thing a pencil sketch!
  • Use only a sharpie and do the whole thing in black and white!
  • When you get up to share, show off the most important things on your mandala.
  • You don’t have to read the whole thing aloud; if you’re more comfortable doing so, you can just paraphrase the important bits.
  • If you’d rather, though, you can just read aloud :)

Try to have fun and get to know your classmates better! We’re stuck together until the end of the semester, after all!

… and most importantly, guys, be proud to show off who you are! Each and every one of you is rockin’ awesome…so show that off in your mandala and letter sharing. And hey….relish the art project and get-to-know-you week, because soon, the REAL fun starts!

Welcome to day 2!

Standard: W.9-10.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Learning Target: Students will share their letters of introduction and begin working on their “sun and shadow” mandala.

Activator: Grammar School with Snooki

Welcome back to day 2, everyone! First things first, we’re going to share our letters. This is nothing formal, just go around the room and say your name and share something you wrote. Really, this is just to help me remember your names. When you’re done, turn your letter in. I’ll read it in full and write back to you :)

Today we are going to start working on our mandalas. I have made mandalas with my classes before, but this time we’re going to do something a bit different and work on what’s called a “Sun/Shadow” mandala. What the heck am I talking about, you ask? Great question!

SUN-SHADOW MANDALA PROJECT

Directions: Mandalas are one of the oldest art forms known to humanity. They are one of the oldest symbols in the world and one of the few universal ones. Translated from Sanskrit, mandala means circle – a symbol of completeness – the most perfect medium in which to present a picture of yourself. One type of mandala is called the sun-shadow mandala, and it represents, in part, the contrasts between one’s sun qualities – what is visible and projected – and the shadow qualities – what is interior and inward. I. The first step in making a mandala is writing two sets of answers to the questions below. One set represents the sun answers; the other set represents the shadow answers:

Sun-Images: How do you appear on the surface to the world? This is the part of you that is seen or projected to others.

1. What animal are you most like?

2. What plant are you most like?

3. What color are you most like?

4. What shape are you most like?

5. What number are you most like?

6. What mineral or gem are you most like?

7. What natural element are you most like?

Shadow-Images: The part of you that is not shown. The shadow images can be considered the direct opposites to the sun images.

1. What animal are you like internally?

2. What plant are you like internally?

3. What color are you like internally?

4. What shape are you like internally?

5. What number are you like internally?

6. What mineral or gem are you like internally?

7. What natural element are you like internally?

Remember:

Sun Image – what is visible and projected (what is seen)

Shadow Image – what is interior and inward (what is hidden; the opposite of the sun image)

 

Once the questions are complete, the next step is to write a sentence for each of your symbols. The most important part of your sentence is the “why” part. Through your sentences you will share why you feel a certain symbol represents you. In the end you will have a total of 14 sentences. Here are some examples:

Sun Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (sun image), because like the (sun image), I __________________________________.

Ex: I am like poison oak, because like poison oak, I’m harmless until stepped on.

Shadow Sentence Frame:

I am like a/the (shadow image), because like the (shadow image), I ___________________________.

Ex: I am like a Venus flytrap, because like a Venus flytrap, I want to capture you and make you a part of me.

 

The next step is to write a single sentence containing all of your sun signs; and, a single sentence containing all of your shadow signs. This requires you to get creative. Consider it word play. You may add words necessary to complete your sentence. You will write both of these sentences around the outside perimeter of your mandala.

Sun Sentence: The playful kitten jumped up into the spider plant to stare up at the sky blue heavens with round, amethyst eyes before pouncing back to earth, scratching his claws in the dirt seven times.

Shadow Sentence: The fierce lion roared in agony as he stumbled into a diamond shaped thorn bush, his eyes black with rage and his breath as hot as fire, as his square jaw picked out thirteen painful needles.

 

Once you have your sun and shadow sentences written, I will give you a template to trace a circle and begin working on your mandala. You should incorporate all of your sun and shadow symbols into your mandala.

We will work on this all day in class, and we will have all day tomorrow for coloring your mandalas in. Enjoy, everyone!