Tag Archive for nearpod

Greek Mythology: The Iliad, Day 1

Goals for the Week:

  1. Understand the mythology of the Trojan War.
  2. Understand the plot and characters of Homer’s Iliad.
  3. Complete the Iliad Character Research Prompt.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Complete a Nearpod lesson on the Trojan War
  2. Choose and listen to one episode of Trojan War: The Podcast (episode 1-10).
  3. Understand and start thinking about this week’s assignment.

Your assignment for this week!

This week you will:

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Learning Target: 

I can analyze the mythology of the Trojan War by listening to a podcast and doing my own research so that I can understand what happens in Homer’s Iliad.

Activator: 

This Nearpod lesson is a very simple summary of the Trojan War. It might be a review from a World History class, but it’s some really good basic background info!

Work Session: 

Today we’re learning the backstory behind The Iliad, the story of the Trojan War that leads up to the famous poem.

Fast Facts:

  • The Trojan War lasted over ten years.
  • The Iliad picks up in year 9.
  • The hero of The Iliad is a dude named Achilles (pronounced “ah-kill-ees”)
  • To understand The Iliad, you need to know some of the events that lead up to the Trojan War.

Under normal circumstances, we would spend two whole days just talking about the stories behind the Trojan War, and then discussing all these things in depth and how they preceded the conflict in The Iliad. But these aren’t normal circumstances, so instead, you’re getting the short version!

Task: Listen to an episode of Trojan War: The Podcast by Jeff Wright. Head over to TrojanWarPodcast.com and browse through the episodes. You can read a short description of each episode, as well as a description of the commentary and the running time. Choose ONE episode from episodes 1-10 and listen to the whole thing. The entire podcast is 23 hours long, so you can listen to it if it interests you, but today I’m just asking for ONE episode.

Closing Session:

After listening to your podcast episode, message your teacher over Remind and tell them which episode you listened to and if you liked it!

Then, let’s preview this week’s assignment. You’re going to be choosing a character and researching their role in the war, then filling in a chart with what you learned.

Make sure you know what’s expected of you this week for your assignment, read over the character choices, and message your teacher if you have any questions.

PS – we will have a ZOOM MEETING on Thursday at 11am! This is optional, but we are looking forward to seeing your smiling face on the camera, so please try to come!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

  1. Understand the plot of Homer’s Iliad
  2. Understand the character of Achilles and his motivations
  3. Begin to grapple with the language of Homer

Short Stories: Character Development Review

 

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Complete your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Watch video about character development (and take a quiz later)
  2. Complete a Nearpod lesson
  3. Identify dynamic characters in literature and film

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze complex characters in short stories by completing a Nearpod lesson so that I can find examples of dynamic characters from movies and television.

Activator: 

Here’s a slightly silly duo explaining character development. Check out their video:

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story: No story! Today we are reviewing character development 🙂

Today we are doing another lesson through NearPod! The lesson should show up right below this text. If you need to sign in, use your school Office365 sign in – message your teacher if you don’t know your sign in info 🙂

Closing Session:

Take this 8-question quiz about Different Types of Characters. How did you do?

Examples of dynamic characters in literature:

  1. Neville Longbottom in the Harry Potter series
  2. Hamlet from Shakespeare’s titular play
  3. Scout from To Kill A Mockingbird
  4. Ponyboy from The Outsiders
  5. Ebenezer Scrooge from A Christmas Carol

Can you think of other dynamic characters from literature? Write down as many as you can think of in thirty seconds. Share with a family member, a friend, or your teacher.

What about film? Here is an example of a dynamic character from a film. Can you think of any others? Share with someone you know!

Looking Ahead: NEXT UNIT!!!

This concludes our short stories unit! Remember, no new content on Friday. Please complete your Choice Board project and turn it in to your teacher by Friday, May 1, at 11:59pm 🙂

On Monday, we begin our FINAL UNIT of the semester: Greek Mythology!

Short Stories: “The Cask of Amontillado”

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Continue working on your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read “The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe
  2. Complete a NearPod lesson on the story.
  3. Understand verbal and dramatic irony.

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: 

I can read “The Cask of Amontillado” and complete a NearPod lesson so that I am prepared to do more NearPod learning in our next unit 😉

Activator: 

Poe uses irony in his short story “The Cask of Amontillado.” Check out these videos about verbal and dramatic irony below.

Verbal irony:

Dramatic irony:

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story:  “The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe

Today we’re trying something a little different – a lesson through NearPod! The lesson should show up right below this text. If you need to sign in, use your school Office365 sign in – message your teacher if you don’t know your sign in info 🙂

Enjoy the lesson!

Closing Session:

Here are five examples from the story. Determine/identify which examples are verbal irony and which examples are dramatic irony? Discuss with your teacher, family, friends, etc.

  1. I took from their sconces two flambeaux, and giving one to Fortunato, bowed him through several suites of rooms to the archway that led into the vaults. I passed down a long and winding staircase, requesting him to be cautious as he followed.
  2. For the love of God, Montresor!” “Yes,” I said, “for the love of God!”
  3. “Come,” I said, with decision, “we will go back; your health is precious. You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible.
  4. “My dear Fortunato, you are luckily met. How remarkably well you are looking to-day.
  5. We had passed through long walls of piled skeletons, with casks and puncheons intermingling, into the inmost recesses of the catacombs.

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Lesson

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re doing tomorrow:

  1. Looking at a NearPod lesson on character development
  2. Finishing up the choice board projects!!