Tag Archive for short stories

Short Stories: Character Development Review

 

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Complete your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Watch video about character development (and take a quiz later)
  2. Complete a Nearpod lesson
  3. Identify dynamic characters in literature and film

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze complex characters in short stories by completing a Nearpod lesson so that I can find examples of dynamic characters from movies and television.

Activator: 

Here’s a slightly silly duo explaining character development. Check out their video:

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story: No story! Today we are reviewing character development 🙂

Today we are doing another lesson through NearPod! The lesson should show up right below this text. If you need to sign in, use your school Office365 sign in – message your teacher if you don’t know your sign in info 🙂

Closing Session:

Take this 8-question quiz about Different Types of Characters. How did you do?

Examples of dynamic characters in literature:

  1. Neville Longbottom in the Harry Potter series
  2. Hamlet from Shakespeare’s titular play
  3. Scout from To Kill A Mockingbird
  4. Ponyboy from The Outsiders
  5. Ebenezer Scrooge from A Christmas Carol

Can you think of other dynamic characters from literature? Write down as many as you can think of in thirty seconds. Share with a family member, a friend, or your teacher.

What about film? Here is an example of a dynamic character from a film. Can you think of any others? Share with someone you know!

Looking Ahead: NEXT UNIT!!!

This concludes our short stories unit! Remember, no new content on Friday. Please complete your Choice Board project and turn it in to your teacher by Friday, May 1, at 11:59pm 🙂

On Monday, we begin our FINAL UNIT of the semester: Greek Mythology!

Short Stories: “The Cask of Amontillado”

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Continue working on your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read “The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe
  2. Complete a NearPod lesson on the story.
  3. Understand verbal and dramatic irony.

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: 

I can read “The Cask of Amontillado” and complete a NearPod lesson so that I am prepared to do more NearPod learning in our next unit 😉

Activator: 

Poe uses irony in his short story “The Cask of Amontillado.” Check out these videos about verbal and dramatic irony below.

Verbal irony:

Dramatic irony:

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story:  “The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe

Today we’re trying something a little different – a lesson through NearPod! The lesson should show up right below this text. If you need to sign in, use your school Office365 sign in – message your teacher if you don’t know your sign in info 🙂

Enjoy the lesson!

Closing Session:

Here are five examples from the story. Determine/identify which examples are verbal irony and which examples are dramatic irony? Discuss with your teacher, family, friends, etc.

  1. I took from their sconces two flambeaux, and giving one to Fortunato, bowed him through several suites of rooms to the archway that led into the vaults. I passed down a long and winding staircase, requesting him to be cautious as he followed.
  2. For the love of God, Montresor!” “Yes,” I said, “for the love of God!”
  3. “Come,” I said, with decision, “we will go back; your health is precious. You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible.
  4. “My dear Fortunato, you are luckily met. How remarkably well you are looking to-day.
  5. We had passed through long walls of piled skeletons, with casks and puncheons intermingling, into the inmost recesses of the catacombs.

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Lesson

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re doing tomorrow:

  1. Looking at a NearPod lesson on character development
  2. Finishing up the choice board projects!!

 

Short Stories: “Ordeal By Cheque”

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Continue working on your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read “Ordeal By Cheque” by Wuther Crue.
  2. Figure out what is happening in the story
  3. Consider how the story might be remade in 2020

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: 

I can read the nontraditional short story “Ordeal By Cheque” and interpret what happens in the story so that I can understand consider my own nontraditional story.

Activator: 

Have you ever written a check? I know I don’t have to write them very often! Check out this short video of the history of check writing and how to fill one out 🙂

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story:“Ordeal By Cheque” by Wuther Crue.

This story was written in 1932 and originally appeared in the magazine Vanity Fair. It’s a unique story, because instead of being told through words and sentences and paragraphs, the entire story is told through images of checks (or cheques, if you prefer).

As you read through the checks, be sure to look at every little detail. The dates, the handwriting, the “Pay to the order of”, the amounts, and the signatures are all important!!

Consider the following as you read:

  • WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE? (that’s the big one :D)
  • Who are the main characters? Who is the protagonist, if anyone?
  • What do you know about the 1920s and the beginning of the 1930s? What was going on in America at that time?

As you put together the details of the story, think about how a similar story could be told today. That’s going to be our closing session 🙂

Closing Session:

To close today, consider how this story would look if it were written in 2020. Ordeal By Venmo? Ordeal By Cashapp? I don’t know, but how would it differ? How would it be the same? How much of the story would you NEED to change to translate it to 2020?

Consider rewriting part of the story as a modern “Ordeal by GooglePay”. If you do, show off to your teacher! I would love to feature you here on the blog!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Story

If you want to get ahead on things, here is the story we’re reading tomorrow:

 

Short Stories: “The Necklace”

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Continue working on your Choice Board project
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant
  2. Look up and understand vocabulary words
  3. Write a creative epilogue to the story

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10L4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9–10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

Learning Target: 

I can understand vocabulary words so that I can read, analyze, and add to “The Necklace.”

Activator: 

Let’s start with a quickwrite! Set yourself a timer for 5 minutes and write a response to this prompt:

  • Why do some people pretend to have more money than they actually have?

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

Today’s Story: “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant

Before reading the story, look up these words so you know their meanings when you encounter them in the reading:

  • Poise
  • Caste
  • Indignant
  • Desolate
  • Chagrin
  • Disconsolate
  • Ardor
  • Latter
  • Robust
  • Awry

(Hint: try using easydefine.com!)

Once you’ve gotten the story all read, consider what happened and how it ended. Go discuss it with a family member, and then come back for our closing session 🙂

Closing Session:

Write a paragraph and and email it to your teacher – this is supposed to be creative and fun!

  • The story leaves the reader wondering what Madame Loisel will do with the rest of her life. Write a 1-2 paragraph epilogue about Madame Loisel’s life after she discovers the truth!!

Looking Ahead: Monday’s Story

Remember, no lessons on Friday! If you want to get ahead on things, here is the story we’re reading on Monday:

 

Short Stories: “The Bet”

Goals for the Week:

  1. Follow along with the daily readings of short stories.
  2. Decide on and begin a project from the Choice Board
  3. Continue to collaborate with teachers and classmates

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Explore the representation of sacrifice and isolation in a literary work
  2. Read and analyze the short story “The Bet” by Anton Chekhov
  3. Recommend a film that demonstrates the theme of social isolation or sacrifice to my teacher

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6: Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze the representation of sacrifice and isolation in “The Bet,” so that I can recommend a film that highlights the same theme(s) to my teacher.

Activator: 

Here are some background notes to “The Bet”. Take a look at this brief PowerPoint.

https://cobbk12org-my.sharepoint.com/:p:/g/personal/denise_milton-speck_cobbk12_org/ETQ3XpMBPv5PvnP84_CStOIB2QOfrIptP_6ONsXbUsIKgA?e=krOOuq

Work Session: 

Your assignment for this unit!

You will have one major assignment for this unit, and you get to choose it! Visit the choice board and select one project to complete about one story. In other words,

  • Choose one of the short stories we read over the next two weeks:
  • Choose one project from the Choice Board
  • Complete your chosen project about your chosen story by Friday, May 1st, at 11:59pm

Today’s Story:  “The Bet” by Anton Chekhov.

This is the story that asks which fate is worse: the death penalty or life imprisonment.

Questions to consider during and after reading:

There are three prominent examples of sacrifice in the story.

  1. How much time does the lawyer sacrifice of his (social) life in an attempt to win the bet?
  2. Does the banker sacrifice his morality in order to win the bet?
  3. At the end of the short story, what does the lawyer sacrifice so that he can be a man unaffected by material possessions?

 

Closing Session: 

For our closing today, we’re going to look at two clips from movies. The first clip is about (social) isolation and from the movie The Martian.

The second clip is about sacrifice and from the movie The Hunger Games.

After you watch the clips, think about other movies that focus on (social) isolation or some sort of sacrifice. (I’m thinking Cast Away for isolation and/or The Pursuit of Happyness for sacrifice). Message your teacher a movie title that represents either theme. You can do this through Remind or whatever method of contact that you utilize. Afterwards, go out and watch the film!

You can also read this article from Time magazine which highlights “10 Movies About Social Distancing to Watch While Practicing Social Distancing”. Stay safe everyone!

 

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Story

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1.  “The Necklace” by Guy de Maupassant