Tag Archive for thinking maps

Act IV: It’s All Downhill From Here!

Can you believe it’s only two weeks to spring break?! It’s also one week until MY BIRTHDAY!!!!!! And also Easter is this weekend, today is the first day of spring, and it’s my daughter’s birthday, so basically it’s the holiday season around here!

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.3. Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

Students will read act IV of Julius Caesar and then create a descriptive bubble map for one of the characters.

Activator:

Work Session:

So, today we are continuing with our reading of Julius Caesar by reading act IV. No lie, the book is kind of downhill after act III. I mean, they fight a war and all, but aside from that nothing happens. How does someone make fighting a civil war boring? Well, it takes a special skill that you’ll see demonstrated today… We can use this as an opportunity to talk about how you focus your writing, because you can totally make boring things interesting and interesting things boring just by changing the focus of your writing.

Anyway, get ready to read your parts again today!!!

Closing Session:

As we finish reading act IV today, I’d like you guys to pick a character and work on describing them. Make a bubble map – I’ll make an example on the board for you – write your character’s name in the center and five adjectives that describe your character in the bubbles around it.

You may choose from Caesar, Brutus, Cassius, Casca, Portia, Calpurnia, or Antony.

Differentiation:

Different length reading parts based on readiness and interest; choice of character for bubble map.

Assessment:

Bubble maps will be graded

Start reading Gilgamesh!!

Standards

ELACC9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

Learning Target

Students will read the first half of The Epic of Gilgamesh selection from our text, and make a thinking map to explain who the main character is.

Warm-up

Take up any homework from yesterday

Activator

Journal 8: Look into your past. Is there any conflict or issues you had to overcome? How did this make you a better person, or maybe not?

Star Trek video – Picard and the story of Gilgamesh

Work Session

We will start to read the first two sections of Gilgamesh. Prologue, The Battle with Humbaba and The Death of Enkidu,Afterward, we’re going to talk about the things that make Gilgamesh into an archetypal hero. While discussing this we are going to create a thinking map (bubble map)! The students need to have at least 5. For each their 5 adjectives, I want them to prove to me how well they know this. And they will do so with evidence in the form of quotes from the story.

Closing Session

Students will share the beginnings of their bubble map with a neighbor, offering a short critique.

Assessment Strategy

Bubble maps will be turned in, informal assessment, listening while students read aloud.

Differentiation

Students will not be forced to read, peer editing will allow some students to assist others who need it.

Deucalion, Pyrrha, and Monday

Standards

RL.9-10.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
W.9-10.9.a Apply grades 9—10 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]”).

Activator

Learning Target

Scholars will look at the similar themes of the flood myths we have looked at in class, and examine how different cultures treat the flood myths differently.

Work Session

Today we’re going to take a break from our regularly scheduled make-a-hero and talk a bit more about flood myths. We’re going to read a story together from ancient Greece about two lovely people named Deucalion and Pyrrha.

After we read the story, I would like for you guys to make a double bubble map. This is the compare and contrast thinking map that allows you to look at two things at once and see what they have in common and where they are different. I want you to make a map comparing Deucalion and Pyrrha to one of the other flood stories we read – either Gilgamesh or Noah.

Next up, we’re going to examine why the two are different. For each bubble on your double bubble, write about the cultural or historical differences between the two places that gave us the stories. For example, one similarity between Gilgamesh’s flood and Deucalion and Pyrrha is that they were both cursed by many gods, not just one. That is because both stories came from cultures that worshiped many gods, not just one.

After you finish the double bubble, I would like for you to write a letter. You are writing to someone who is confused about all the flood myths and doesn’t know there is more than one. Your letter should explain the differences in the two myths and why those differences exist.

When you finish your double bubble map and letter, go ahead and turn it in. After that, I think I need to give you guys some more time to work on your make-a-hero.

Closing Session

Make-a-Hero Check in

Assessment

Letters and double bubble maps will be graded.

Differentiation

Students will have the visual strategy of the double bubble, printed double bubbles for those that need the graphic organizer, and letters use informal writing.

Gilgatuesday!

Standard: RL.9-10.4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).

Learning Target: Students will read the first half of The Epic of Gilgamesh selection from our text, and make a thinking map to explain who the main character is.

Activator: Star Trek? Really?

So, after watching our snazzy video today, we’re going to dive into reading Gilgamesh! Are you excited? YOU SHOULD BE!

Just in case any of you guys are reading from home or ISS or something, here is a link to the full text of Gilgamesh. We’re reading excerpts from this text in our book – you want to search in the PDF for The Battle with Humbaba, The Death of Enkidu, The Story of the Flood, and The Return.

Epic of Gilgamesh, Translated by N.K. Sandars

And today we’re going to read the first two of those sections, plus the prologue. Afterward, we’re going to talk about the things that make Gilgamesh into an archetypal hero. What’s that? Archetype?

ar·che·type/ˈärk(i)ˌtīp/

Noun:
  1. A very typical example of a certain person or thing.
  2. An original that has been imitated.

(vocab list, vocab list…)

Anyway, to discuss who and what Gilgamesh is, let’s make…dundunDUN!!! A THINKING MAP!!!!

I would like each of you to make a bubble map to explain who Gilgamesh is. That means you put Gilgamesh’s name in the center of the bubble map and write adjectives in the bubbles around it. All these adjectives should describe Gilgamesh. I want you to have at least five. For those of you that are new to this whole thinking map thing, here’s what a bubble map looks like:


Who doesn’t love ice cream?

Now, here’s the catch. For each of your adjectives, I want you to prove to me how you know this. And you’ll do so with evidence in the form of quotes from the story. For right now, go forth and make your bubble map and start finding your quotes. Tomorrow…the REAL work begins!!!

Then Fall, Tuesday!

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.5. Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • RL.9-10.6. Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: Students will understand the dramatic element of unity of time, place and action, and how this element adds to Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

Activator: Our daily video!
Mark Antony’s Speech – 1953 Julius Caesar Movie

So, to completely understand our big ol’ concept for the day, we need to look what what the Classical Unities are. Thus far, our play has taken place on February 15th (At the feast of Lupercal) in Rome, on March 15th (The Ides of March) in Rome, and now as we move into act 4, we move to a different place and a different time!

Why do you think Shakespeare chose to violate these classical unities in his play? What does it change about the play?

After we finish reading act III today, we’re going to continue working on our bubble maps and begin watching a movie. YAY MOVIE!! As you guys are working on your maps, we will turn on this little miniseries about Julius Caesar, both the history and the play. Sound good? GOOD!